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Recital
DEMANDING VIOLIN SONATAS CONQUERED BY BEILMAN-WEISS DUO IN SCHROEDER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 14, 2017
Violinist Benjamin Beilman’s ravishing Mozart performance at last summer’s Weill Hall ChamberFest finale lured an enthusiastic crowd to Schroeder Hall May 14 to hear if his secure virtuosity was up to a program of demanding sonatas. He did not disappoint. With the powerful pianist Orion Weiss in t...
Symphony
SOVIETS INVADE WEILL HALL, TAKE NO PRISONERS
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 07, 2017
Bruno Ferrandis may be French, but he excels in Soviet repertoire. His Slavonic expertise was more than amply demonstrated at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s May 7 concert, where the program began joyfully with Khachaturian’s ballet suite from “Masquerade,” surged forward with Prokofiev’s second violin co...
Recital
MASTERFUL PIANISM IN GOODE'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, May 05, 2017
Pianist Richard Goode programmed an evening of treasures May 5 from four great composers, and is an artist of intimacy and intelligence, power and passion, able to go deep and to soar. Hearing Mr. Goode play this literature was a reminder of how music does indeed bridge worlds and time. Bach’s E m...
Recital
ELEGANT ORGAN SALUTE TO THE REFORMATION
by Paul Blanchard
Sunday, April 30, 2017
Organist Jonathan Dimmock presented an April 30 recital in homage to the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, playing Schroeder Hall’s wonderful Brombaugh instrument. Mr. Dimmock is the organist for the San Francisco Symphony, principal organist for the Palace of the Legion of Honor and teaches at...
Chamber
NOTES AND BARS DO NOT A PRISON MAKE
by Nicki Bell
Saturday, April 29, 2017
The Hermitage Piano Trio brought exuberant musicality and sumptuous sound to a packed house April 29 in Occidental's Performing Arts Center for the last concert in the Redwood Arts Council’s 37th season. With a wide interpretive range--from lush to delicate to passionate--these three young Russian v...
Recital
SCHUMANN AND BARTOK HIGHLIGHT BRONFMAN RECITAL IN WEILL
by Lee Ormasa
Friday, April 21, 2017
Those people once addicted to the “Angry Birds” game application likely suffered an auditory flashback during the opening measures of the allegro from Bartok’s Suite, Op. 14, the opening work in Yefim Bronfman’s April 21 recital at Weill Hall. The repetitive opening figures of the Bartok were...
Symphony
HULKING MAHLER "TITAN" AT SO CO PHIL'S SEASON FINALE
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, April 08, 2017
A composer’s first symphony rarely gives a clear indication of what beautiful complexities will follow over the years. Early Mozart and Tchaikovsky are examples, and the big exceptions to this axiom are the “firsts” of Beethoven, Shostakovich and Mahler. Tackling Mahler ‘s D Major Symphony (No. 1,...
Symphony
SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY STAYS CLOSE TO HOME
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, March 26, 2017
Santa Rosa Symphony concerts usually feature high-powered soloists imported from afar, but for their recent “Bring on the Strings” concert set, they stuck close to home, thrusting their principal violin, viola and cello into the limelight. The violinist (Joseph Edelberg) and the violist (Elizabeth P...
Recital
SLAM BANG SONORITY IN HAOCHEN ZHANG'S SCHROEDER RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 19, 2017
Piano Competition winners are in ample supply, and it’s often a hit and miss proposition as to their sterling interpretative qualities. However, the quadrennial Van Cliburn Competition in Ft. Worth has continually produced top-level artists, and the 2009 winner Haochen Zhang proved a formidable per...
Symphony
FOREIGN AFFAIRS CHARACTERS OF THE BAROQUE
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, March 12, 2017
Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin, known as Akamus, played a Weill Hall concert March 12 in a program called "Foreign Affairs -Characters of the Baroque.” The ensemble, that began in 1984, has 15 musicians led by concert master Bernhard Forck. Attired in elegant black with red accents, ranging from tie...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Numina Center for Spirituality and the Arts / Sunday, August 23, 2009
Carol Menke, soprano; Kathleen Reynolds, flute; Roy Zajac, clarinet; Laura McLellan, cello; Norma Brown, piano

AN ARTFUL AFTERNOON

by Steve Osborn
Sunday, August 23, 2009

The Numina concert in Santa Rosa’s Church of the Incarnation Aug. 23 was billed as “An Artful Afternoon,” and it was certainly full of art. Canvases by the venerable Boris Ilyn filled the north wall of Farlander Hall, and musical art of many eras—Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Modern—emanated from a performance space along the windowed east, with its view of the church’s cloister. The only distraction was the relentless hum of a refrigerator from the kitchen, tempered somewhat by the post-concert hors d’oeuvres therein contained.

Farlander is the church’s dining hall, designed for eating rather than music, but its linoleum floor and high ceiling, to say nothing of its restful view, offer a pleasant listening experience, oddly enhanced by large papier mâché figures of St. Francis, Martin Luther King and Mother Theresa gazing benevolently down from on high.

The subtitle of the concert was “Chamber Music with the Locals,” in this case Carol Menke, soprano, Kathleen Reynolds, flute, Roy Zajac, clarinet, Laura McLellan, cello, and the esteemed pianist Norma Brown. All five are well known to Sonoma County audiences, either as members of the Santa Rosa Symphony or as frequent soloists.

Soprano, flute, cello and piano started the afternoon with a svelte performance of two German arias by Handel. The lyrics of the first, “Süsse Stille,” were particularly appropriate to the late summer afternoon and the friendly, room-filling crowd: “Sweet stillness, gentle source / Of peaceful composure.” Menke sang the gorgeous melody mezzo voce, her voice free of any stress or strain. As always, her pronunciation was impeccable, and her intonation spot on.

Reynolds’ flute obbligato in the second aria, “Meine Seele hört im sehen,” was equally assured, and the interplay between soprano and flute was a joy to hear. Both arias evoked simplicity and happiness, coupled with masterful compositional skill.

The composer Philip Parker, still very much alive, exhibits many of the same talents as the great German master. His “Games” for flute and clarinet likewise offers simplicity and happiness, albeit at a faster pace. Each of the children’s games depicted in this four-movement piece—Leap Frog, Follow the Leader, Hop and Tag—finds its musical counterpart in the ingenious interplay between the instruments. In “Leap Frog,” for example, the one leaps over the other, and in “Follow the Leader,” the two take turns leading and following. Reynolds and Zajac performed this inventive duet to the hilt, conjuring up images of children racing across a playground.

The first half concluded with three songs for soprano and clarinet by one of Beethoven’s lesser known contemporaries, Ludwig Spohr. The first two—“Sei still, mein Herz” (Be still, my heart) and “Das heimliche Lied” (The secret song)—were typically tragic Romantic works, with the clarinet lending a plangent tone to the proceedings; but the last, “Zwiegesang” (Two songs in one), was a delight. Menke (playing the part of a girl) and Zajac (a bird) enacted their roles beautifully, each one complementing the other’s lines to Brown’s steady accompaniment.

More oddities were in store for the second half, which began with Ravel’s rarely performed “Chansons madécasses” for soprano, flute, cello and piano. These three “Songs of Madagascar,” written in 1925, are remarkable for their use of exotic musical themes and their expression of colonial guilt. Lyrics such as “Do not trust the whites!” are well removed from Romantic lieder.

The first song, “Nahandove,” began with a beautiful cello solo, expertly played by McLellan on her resonant instrument. The ensuing love story was well suited to Menke’s range, and Reynolds’ piccolo added a humorous touch. The next, “Aoua,” the warning about whites, was impressively threatening. The last, “Il est doux,” about lying under a leafy tree in the hot afternoon, was likewise slow, voluptuous and languid.

Breaking free from torpor, the concert concluded with a lively performance of a Haydn trio for flute, cello and piano, deftly played by all. Brown, who has charmed Sonoma County audiences for more than 50 years, shows no signs of slowing down. She hit all the notes with clear dynamics and phrasing, leading the charge through the sprightly Allegro opening movement, to the lilting Andantino second, and finally the finger-twisting Vivace assai. The performance was wonderful, a fitting end to an artful afternoon.