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Chamber
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL COMBINATIONS IN VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 20, 2019
A Lovely summer afternoon in Sonoma Valley, an excellent small concert hall, enthusiastic audience, exciting musicians and creative programming with interesting story lines. All these were combined July 20 at a Valley of the Moon Festival concert titled “An Italian in Paris.” This is the fifth seaso...
Opera
'ELIXIR' A WELCOME TONIC IN SPRIGHTLY ANNUAL MMF OPERA
by Terry McNeill
Friday, July 19, 2019
In most of the Mendocino Music Festival’s 33 seasons a single evening is given over to a staged opera, with bare bones sets, lighting, costumes, minimal cast and short length. No Wagner or Verdi here, no multiple acts and complicated production demands. Light and frothy are the usual, and so it wa...
Recital
PUNGENT WALTZES AND VIRTUOSITY IN LADEUR'S SLV RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, July 17, 2019
San Francisco based pianist Jeffrey LaDeur has become one of the most sought-after North Bay virtuosi, and cemented that reputation July 17 in a short but eclectic recital in Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village Chamber Music Series. Before 140 in the Village’s auditorium Mr. LaDeur began with Schubert...
Choral and Vocal
NOBLE BRAHMS REQUIEM PERFORMANCE CLOSES SONOMA BACH'S SEASON
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, June 01, 2019
Sonoma Bach, conducted by Robert Worth, presented a truly grand finale to their 2018-19 "Light Out of Darkness" season in two sold out Schroeder Hall performances June 1 and 2. The program "A Human Requiem" was received rapturously with a well-deserved standing ovation for the main work, Brahms' ...
Chamber
THREE SONG CYCLES HIGHLIGHT VIBRANT SLV RECITAL
by Pamela Hicks-Gailey
Wednesday, May 08, 2019
An ambitious recital of vocal and piano music was presented May 8 at Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village by mezzo-soprano Kindra Scharich and pianist Jeffrey LaDeur. The duo engaged the enthusiastic audience with scholarly friendliness and artistry in performances of Beethoven's short cycle of six song...
Symphony
ALEXANDER TORADZE DELIVERS A LESSON IN SERENITY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 05, 2019
An entire concerto movement consisting of serene piano melodies over a soothing backdrop is probably not the first thing that springs to mind when seeing Shostakovich’s name on an orchestra program, but that’s exactly what pianist Alexander Toradze delivered--twice--at Sunday’s Santa Rosa Symphony c...
Symphony
MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON CLOSES WITH AUTUMNAL ELGAR AND THEATRICAL BEETHOVEN
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, April 28, 2019
Mozart’s enchanting Overture to his opera The Magic Flute, a miniature tapestry of gems from the 1791 work, opened the Marin Symphony’s final concert of the 2018-2019 season. Under conductor Alasdair Neale, the playing of the sprightly seven-minute piece by a reduced-size classical ensemble sparkled...
Recital
SHAHAM-EGUCHI DUO'S EXCITING MUSICAL GENEROSITY IN WEILL
by Abby Wasserman
Friday, April 26, 2019
Violinist Gil Shaham may be the most modest virtuoso on the concert stage today, and it is the great music he most wishes to put forward, never himself. Generosity, a quality he is known for, was abundantly clear in Weill Hall April 26 when he performed, with pianist Akira Eguchi, a generous program...
Recital
GLITTERING PIANISM IN LI'S OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Piano prodigies have always been a fascination for the music public, and the greatest of them (some were Mozart, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Saint Saëns, Hofmann) went on to legendary fame. George Li, who made is local debut at a Music at Oakmont recital April 11, was a remarkable recent keyboard prodigy t...
Symphony
SO CO PHIL'S SEASON CLOSER WITH EXPANSIVE PROKOFIEV 5TH IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 07, 2019
Closing their 20th season with their usual programming aplomb, the Sonoma County Philharmonic played a provocative set of concerts April 6 and 7 in the Jackson Theater, the Orchestra’s new home at the Sonoma Country Day School by the Sonoma County Airport. Local composer Nolan Gasser’s Sonoma Overt...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Marin Symphony / Sunday, February 28, 2010
Alasdair Neale, conductor
Hoyt Smith, narrator

Marin Symphony Flutist Monica Daniel-Barker

RICH ORCHESTRAL PORTRAITS IN MARIN SYMPHONY CONCERT

by
Sunday, February 28, 2010

The fourth “chapter” of the Marin Symphony’s “Season of the Scribe” continued Feb. 28 when Alasdair Neale conducted an inspiring program of Debussy, Copland, and Tchaikovsky in the Marin Civic Center Auditorium.

Debussy’s “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun” began the concert with the Orchestra painting one of Debussy’s most impressionistic and popular orchestral works. Principal flutist Monica Daniel-Barker opened the Debussy with an evocative solo, a descent to a tritone below the original pitch, and was joined by oboist Margot Golding, setting the mood of subtle shadings in Debussy’s 1894 masterpiece. The familiar faun motif in its sylvan forest continued throughout, the theme being traded between members of the Orchestra. It was a feast of languorous melodies and shimmering orchestral playing.

In recognition of February as President’s month, Mr. Neale led the Orchestra in Copland’s “Lincoln Portrait,” skillfully narrated by KDFC radio announcer Hoyt Smith. Composed in 1942 during the initial American entry into World War II, this short orchestral work is a musical portrait of America’s 16th president, quoting “Campdown races” and “Springfield Mountain” among other songs.. It’s a beautiful piece with Copland’s discipline of simplicity and clarity setting the mood for Lincoln’s simple but always elegant prose.

Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5, Op. 64, in four movements, completed the program. A passionately lyrical composition, the E Minor Symphony is from 1888 and mirrors the composer’s fascination with man’s fate. Working without a score, Mr. Neale paid special attention to the dotted rhythms, originally heard in the first subject group. The horn solo that begins the second movement (dolce con molto espressione), perhaps the most famous in the symphonic repertoire, was hauntingly played by Alan Camphouse. It later became the melody Tin Pan Alley’s “Moon Love,” and Mr. Camphouse was subsequently joined by Ms. Golding’s oboe in a poignant theme combined with strings.

Mr. Neale led the finale, a majestic march begun in the strings with a hectic rhythmic drive. The brass heralded the development, ending this momentous work in orchestral splendor.