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Recital
ORGAN REGISTRATION MASTERY HEARD IN WALHAIN'S RECITAL
by Robert Young
Tuesday, July 18, 2017
A group of 65 lucky attendees July 18 had the pleasure of hearing Etienne Walhain’s recital at the Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa. Mr. Walhain is organist at the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Tournai, Belgium, and played to a varied program Bach, Franck, and Reger. He used the tonal resource...
Opera
DONIZETTI'S DON PASQUALE HAS LYRICAL CHARM IN MENDOCINO FESTIVAL PRODUCTION
by Elly Lichenstein
Friday, July 14, 2017
Mendocino Music Festival's production of Donizetti's beloved opera buffa Don Pasquale - a one-night affair July 15 that was presented in an enormous tent on a greensward overlooking the Pacific Ocean - delighted an audience of more than 600 while doing some real justice to this frothy gem of commedi...
Recital
NOVACEK'S 2ND HALF TRIFECTA SCORES AT MENDO MUSIC FESTIVAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, July 13, 2017
Modern classical piano recitals are in two parts, with longer and perhaps more profound music proceeding perhaps shorter and usually stimulating lighter fare. In John Novacek’s July 13 Mendocino Music Festival recital the best playing came unexpectedly in the eight abbreviated works comprising the ...
Recital
STYLUS AND PLAYING FANTASTICUS IN YOUNG'S ORGAN RECITAL
by Paul Blanchard
Sunday, June 25, 2017
Organist Robert Young gave a wonderful tour through the stylus fantasticus (fantastic style) organ literature June 25 playing a recital on the Casavant organ at Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa. Mr. Young recently became the organist at the Church and previously served for 20 years as Music D...
Chamber
KODALY DUO TRUMPS POPULAR MENDELSSOHN TRIO AT SLV CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, June 21, 2017
It’s not really a secret, but Sonoma County’s best chamber music series is one without much notoriety or publicity. The concerts at Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village programs are only for residents and a few invited guests. Impresario Robert Hayden years ago honed his producer skills as founder of ...
Recital
DEMANDING VIOLIN SONATAS CONQUERED BY BEILMAN-WEISS DUO IN SCHROEDER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 14, 2017
Violinist Benjamin Beilman’s ravishing Mozart performance at last summer’s Weill Hall ChamberFest finale lured an enthusiastic crowd to Schroeder Hall May 14 to hear if his secure virtuosity was up to a program of demanding sonatas. He did not disappoint. With the powerful pianist Orion Weiss in t...
Symphony
SOVIETS INVADE WEILL HALL, TAKE NO PRISONERS
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 07, 2017
Bruno Ferrandis may be French, but he excels in Soviet repertoire. His Slavonic expertise was more than amply demonstrated at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s May 7 concert, where the program began joyfully with Khachaturian’s ballet suite from “Masquerade,” surged forward with Prokofiev’s second violin co...
Recital
MASTERFUL PIANISM IN GOODE'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, May 05, 2017
Pianist Richard Goode programmed an evening of treasures May 5 from four great composers, and is an artist of intimacy and intelligence, power and passion, able to go deep and to soar. Hearing Mr. Goode play this literature was a reminder of how music does indeed bridge worlds and time. Bach’s E m...
Recital
ELEGANT ORGAN SALUTE TO THE REFORMATION
by Paul Blanchard
Sunday, April 30, 2017
Organist Jonathan Dimmock presented an April 30 recital in homage to the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, playing Schroeder Hall’s wonderful Brombaugh instrument. Mr. Dimmock is the organist for the San Francisco Symphony, principal organist for the Palace of the Legion of Honor and teaches at...
Chamber
NOTES AND BARS DO NOT A PRISON MAKE
by Nicki Bell
Saturday, April 29, 2017
The Hermitage Piano Trio brought exuberant musicality and sumptuous sound to a packed house April 29 in Occidental's Performing Arts Center for the last concert in the Redwood Arts Council’s 37th season. With a wide interpretive range--from lush to delicate to passionate--these three young Russian v...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Redwood Arts Council / Saturday, October 23, 2010
Škampa String Quartet

Škampa String Quartet

ANGUISHED AUTOBIOGRAPHY

by Steve Osborn
Saturday, October 23, 2010

Chamber music ensembles come and go, sometimes in their entirety, sometimes player by player. When a first violinist leaves a string quartet, for example, the group either dissolves or scrambles to find a replacement. Rarely, however, do two players leave at once, but such is the case with the Czech Republic’s two-decade-old Skampa String Quartet, which appeared for its concert in Occidental on Oct. 23 boasting not one but two new violinists since its last appearance in Sonoma County two years ago.

At the 2008 concert, held at Santa Rosa Junior College, the Skampa players stood (excepting the cello) and delivered a memorable rendition of Smetana’s first string quartet, “From My Life.” This year the quartet sat and delivered an equally memorable rendition of an equally autobiographical quartet, the Shostakovich No. 8.

Getting to the “memorable” category wasn’t easy. The two new violinists, Helena Jiríkovská (first) and Daniela Soucková (second), had big shoes to fill, a task made harder by their diminutive frames and less than compelling stage presences. Jiríkovská in particular was rigidly focused on her score, in stark contrast to the emotive cellist Lukás Polák and the founding violist Radim Sedmidubsky, who played many passages from memory.

The Skampa began their concert in the new Occidental Center for the Arts with the two extant middle movements from Haydn’s last quartet fragment, Op. 103. As Sedmidubsky said, the fragment is a good concert opener, and it showed off the clean acoustics of the new Center, a converted elementary school gymnasium. As befitting its former small inhabitants, the gym is on a petite scale, seating about 100, with a three-foot-high stage at the south end. Dominating the stage is a set of sound reflectors (they looked like birch plywood), with matching reflective “clouds” hanging from the ceiling.

The audience sits on cloth-covered stacking chairs, either on the central floor or on raised platforms in the back. Sight lines are excellent, and the stage lighting is subdued. Adding to the pleasant mix is an open kitchen on the west wall from which refreshments are served at intermission. For this performance, almost every chair was filled, despite the torrential rain outside.

Compared to the Center’s former cramped quarters at the Occidental Community Church, the acoustics have somewhat less presence, perhaps because of the sound-absorbing tiles on the gym’s ceiling. One hopes that the new Center is a work in progress, however, so further adjustments can be made.

Back to the Skampa, which dispatched the Haydn with precision and clarity but not much in the way of feeling. That latter quality began to show through in the next work, the last quartet (Op. 106) of their countryman Antonin Dvorak. This infrequently performed work makes considerable technical demands on all the players and features a dizzying succession of melodic ideas. Just when Dvorak seems to have settled into a theme, he leapfrogs into another musical universe.

The Skampa approached Dvorak’s quartet with considerable energy, but they often seemed in too much of a hurry to let the piece sing. Despite his extroverted playing, the cellist emitted a thin tone, and the first violinist was frequently detached from the rest of the group. The second violinist had a better sound and seemed more engaged; her solo at the beginning of the second movement was particularly impressive. Holding everything together was the veteran violist Sedmidubsky, who leaned out from his chair at the left end of the quartet to play his occasional solos to the audience.

All the notes and dynamics were there, but the performance never caught fire. Thankfully, the conflagration did arrive after a lengthy intermission. Following a helpful introduction by Sedmidubsky, the Skampa eased into the Shostakovich with a sustained pianissimo, setting the stage for the sudden fortissimo of the work’s rollicking second theme. They played with conviction and certainty, blending their instruments beautifully and creating a striking unanimity of sound.

The rest of this memorable quartet, which many consider to be Shostakovich’s finest, was equally well played. Most important, the Skampa invested real meaning into the work, making Shostakovich’s anguished musical autobiography come alive. After the quiescent and somber ending, the audience sat for a moment in complete silence, holding their tumultuous applause until the musicians stood up. The standing ovation was well deserved.