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Chamber
VANHAL QUARTET AT VOM FESTIVAL DISCOVERY AT HANNA CENTER
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 15, 2018
A near-capacity crowd of 220 filled the Sonoma Hanna Boys Center Auditorium July 15 for the opening concert of the fourth Valley of the Moon Music Festival. This Festival presents gems of the Classical and early Romantic periods performed on instruments of the composerís era, which presents a few ch...
Opera
SPARKLING CIMAROSA OPERA HIGHLIGHTS MENDOCINO MUSIC FESTIVAL
by Kathryn Stewart
Friday, July 13, 2018
The Classical music era was a time of extraordinary innovation. Dominated by composers from the German-speaking countries, the period witnessed the handiwork of masterpieces by two classical giants, Haydn and Mozart. Both composers put forth a tremendous catalog of masterful works and perhaps to our...
Symphony
!PURA VIDA! A SONIC TRIUMPH FOR SO CO PHIL IN THRILLING COSTA RICA TOUR CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Tuesday, June 19, 2018
Long anticipated events, such as a great sporting game, gourmet feast, holiday trip or a concert, occasionally fall way short of expectations. The results donít measure to expectations. With the Sonoma County Philharmonicís Costa Rica concert June 19, the performance exceeded any heated or tenuou...
Symphony
SO CO PHIL BON VOYAGE CONCERT AN ODYSSEY OF CONTRASTING SOUND
by Terry McNeill
Friday, June 15, 2018
In a splashy bon voyage concert June 15 the Sonoma County Philharmonic Orchestra launched its June 17-25 Costa Rica tour, performing gratis in Santa Rosaís Jackson Theater the repertoire for tour concerts in San Josť, Costa Ricaís capital, and in surrounding towns. Conductor Norman Gamboa pr...
Chamber
COMMANDING CHOPIN AND DEBUSSY IN SLV RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, June 06, 2018
Concerts at the classy Spring Lake Village Retirement Home in Santa Rosa have admission limited to residents and a few guests, but the chance to hear a first cabin North Bay pianist June 6 brought a Classical Sonoma reviewer into the audience of 100. The crowd numbers were unusually low due to a ba...
Recital
MUSICAL ALCHEMY INSIDE A HIDDEN GEM
by Kayleen Asbo
Friday, May 25, 2018
The Petaluma Historical Library and Museum is a hidden gem of Sonoma County, a gracious†building†that is one of Sonoma Countyís loveliest venues for chamber music concerts, with a fine period piano particularly suited to Romantic music.† Of the surprisingly large array of festivities there, one of t...
Chamber
FINAL VOM MUSICIANS CONCERT IN SCHROEDER A SCHUBERT DELIGHT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, May 12, 2018
It's rare to have the opportunity to compare in a short period two performances of the same major Schubert work, in this case the great B Flat Piano Trio, D. 898. The chance came May 12 when the Valley of the Moon Festival musicians played it in Schroeder, just over a month since the Hallís residen...
Symphony
FERRANDIS BIDS ADIEU WITH MAHLERíS FINAL SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 06, 2018
Sonoma State students in graduation robes posed for pictures and hugged each other at the universityís stone gates on Sunday afternoon, mirroring the prolonged farewells within the universityís Green Music Center, where Bruno Ferrandis bid adieu to the Santa Rosa Symphony after a dozen years at the ...
Symphony
SONIC SPLENDOR AT MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Abby Wasserman
Tuesday, May 01, 2018
The Marin Symphony Orchestra ended the current season with a flourish, interpreting big and small works by Richard Strauss and Stravinsky. Strauss and Stravinsky were contemporaries for 40 years, but inhabited different worlds. Both composers were affected by cataclysmic changes and war, and musical...
Symphony
ORGAN SYMPHONY IN SSU ORCHESTRA CONCERT IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 29, 2018
Though Classical Sonoma seldom reviews student concerts, as ample North Coast concerts keep the staff of 11 reviewers busy. But the chance to hear the Sonoma State University Orchestra tackle St. SaŽnsí majestic Organ Symphony April 29 was a rare opportunity and not easily to be missed. Avec lí...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Santa Rosa Symphony / Monday, January 28, 2008
Bruno Ferrandis, conducting
Joseph Edelberg, violin

Joseph Edelberg

OUR AVIAN ROOTS

by Steve Osborn
Monday, January 28, 2008

In pursuit of the dragon Fafner, the mythical hero Siegfried pauses to hear the forest murmur, tries to imitate a bird, gives up, gets hold of a fiddle instead, plays until the moon rises, then buckles himself to the dragon's tail for a wild ride through the firmament. That, more or less, was the synopsis for the Santa Rosa Symphony's Jan. 28 concert at the Wells Fargo Center.

Although the symphony played four diverse pieces from three different centuries, including the present one, the compositional similarities were more striking than the contrasts. Each piece evoked a sylvan landscape, often using that most primordial of musical phrases: bird call. The call is explicit in Wagner's "Forest Murmurs," which opened the program, and nearly as much in Mendelssohn's "Italian" symphony, which closed it two hours later. In between were some distinctly avian melodies in Bach's E major violin concerto and a veritable chorus of two- and three-note calls in George Tsontakis's magical "Clair de Lune."

The Tsontakis was the highlight of the evening. Premiered just last year by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, the piece consists of two movements: "Moonlit" and "Mischievous--Lullaby." As explained by Maestro Bruno Ferrandis in a brief but insightful introduction, the first movement, with its whole-tone scales and coloristic devices, evokes Debussy; whereas the second, full of joy and jubilation, evokes Messiaen. These pillars of French composition are only a point of reference, however, for Tsontakis has a voice that is distinctly his own: a "free spirit," in his friend Ferrandis's judgment.

The 20-minute piece begins with winds articulating two-note phrases, either ascending or descending, conjuring up a waking forest of birds. The strings then enter on an ascending whole-tone scale, creating a lush sonic landscape ripe for melody, which is eventually supplied in turn by an oboe and a solo violin. The texture throughout is alternately shimmering and dense, like the lunar lighting of the title. The effect was eerie and often mesmerizing.

The second movement was equally delightful, beginning with heavy syncopations and a rock-solid beat, thanks to Ferrandis, that evoked the driving rhythms of the Jazz Age. Short bursts of sound, repeated and varied, were combined like sonic strands of DNA, each new combination assuming a different form of musical life. Climaxes and cadences followed in rapid succession, finally building up to a truly swinging orchestra.

Ferrandis is to be commended for including new works on most of his programs. Based on what he's played so far this season, 21st-century classical music is alive and well; as is 19th-century music, in the person of Felix Mendelssohn. Still flush with the exhilaration of the Tsontakis, the orchestra plunged right into the Italian Symphony, with its familiar pair of opening thirds: dah-dee-dah, dah-dee-dah. Or is that opening birds? The early e-mail program Eudora used to announce new mail with an image of a rooster and an alert sound lifted straight from Mendelssohn. The connection with the earlier bird calls was unmistakable.

The subsequent development, however, was a world apart. Ferrandis is an almost ideal Mendelssohn conductor, with precise, well-engineered movements that bring out all the intricate qualities of the composer's lapidary scores. Every section is exactly in place; the beat is unvarying; the crescendos and decrescendos elegant and smooth. Whereas other conductors get overwhelmed by the mechanism and tradition, Ferrandis infused energy and life into a symphony played for perhaps the millionth time, with many million left to go.

Each movement was remarkable in its own way, from the clarion calls and the great unison strings in the first, to the elegiac march of the second and the superb horn duet in the third. It was amusing to watch Ferrandis's feet as he waltzed back and forth across the podium, his toes almost as expressive as his fingers. The climax, needless to say, came in the last movement, where Ferrandis really pushed the tempo, verging into prestissimo. Amazingly, everyone hung in there, particularly the strings, whose intonation was virtually flawless. A magnificent performance.

The efforts in the first half were less inspired, although the music itself was of considerable interest. The program began with the "Forest Murmurs" sequence from Wagner's opera Siegfried. Once again, bird calls dominated, with flutes, clarinets, and oboes assuming various avian personalities above a murmuring bed of strings. The horns, unfortunately, were somewhat out of tune, so the operatic picture never came into full focus. What was most incongruous, however, was the sight of Ferrandis conducting all of this from a miniature score the size of a paperback novel. Maybe it was the version for puppet opera.

The reduction in size continued with the Bach E major violin concerto. Many players left the stage, leaving just 24 strings, a harpsichord, and the soloist, concertmaster Joseph Edelberg. His performance, though full of insight, was often tense, perhaps because of his unfamiliar role in front of the orchestra rather than within it. Nonetheless, he shaped passages in the opening movement in unusual ways, bringing out notes and phrases that are normally hidden. He seemed to relax more in the unhurried second movement, as Ferrandis coaxed an ethereal sound out of the orchestra's reduced forces. Perhaps because the "Forest Murmurs" were still in the air, the movement seemed to continue the sylvan and avian themes. Finally, the sprightly third movement brought the first half to a satisfying conclusion, rounded out by warm applause.