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Chamber
FLORESTAN TRIO'S MENDELSSOHN AT SPRING LAKE VILLAGE CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Friday, March 08, 2019
Spring Lake Village’s monthly concerts usually clock in under an hour, but the March 8 Florestan Trio’s performance was more extended as so much good music was on tap for the 125 residents attending at Santa Rosa’s premiere retirement residence facility. Four short pieces made up the first half, be...
Chamber
TILDEN TRIO'S BOHEMIAN ENERGY AT DOMINICAN CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 03, 2019
Hard on the heels of the Trio Navarro’s late February concert in Sonoma State’s Schroeder Hall, Northern California’s other premiere resident piano trio, the Tilden, played an equally convincing program March 3 in Dominican University’s Angelico Hall. Clearly each hall’s acoustics, stage pianos and...
Recital
24 SONGS IN A MENKE-THOMPSON RECITAL ODYSSEY
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, February 23, 2019
Sonoma County pop and country singing enjoys continued popularity but it rare to see a professional classical vocal concert announced. Diva Ruth Ann Swenson was once a local star, but she has long departed and not much virtuoso recital singing can be found in the North Bay. But the exception to th...
Chamber
UNEXPECTED ARENSKY AND MENDELSSOHN BY THE NAVARRO
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 17, 2019
The 100 people entering Schroeder Hall Feb. 17 for a Trio Navarro concert were handed a program that appeared to feature two popular piano trios, Mendelssohn and Arensky. But continuing the Navarro’s tradition of repertoire exploration, the pieces were not the usual first Mendelssohn and first Aren...
Recital
GLOVER'S ECLECTIC PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHT'S CINNABAR RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 17, 2019
Daniel Glover is arguably the busiest virtuoso pianist in the San Francisco Bay area, but rarely is heard in North Bay concerts. So 90 local pianophiles were anxious to hear him Feb. 17 in Petaluma’s charming small Cinnabar Theater, and they were rewarded with an eclectic program of sometimes unfam...
Symphony
MENDELSSOHN'S SCOTTISH SAVES THE EVENING IN SRS WEILL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Monday, February 11, 2019
The audience entering Weill Hall for Santa Rosa Symphony concerts Feb. 9-11 were presented with a program that on first glance appeared a curious patchwork – a great symphony mixed with a seldom heard concerto and two disparate overtures, and a guest conductor unknown locally. Monday night’s concer...
Recital
INTRIGUING BELL-HAYWOOD RECITAL BEFORE FULL HOUSE IN WEILL HALL
by Abby Wasserman
Friday, February 08, 2019
A big portion of the capacity audience in Weill Hall February 8th came to hear violinist Joshua Bell’s virtuosity, and were treated as well to splendid playing from Sam Haywood, Mr. Bell’s regular pianist since 2010. The duo performed three engaging sonatas, highlighted by Mr. Bell’s sterling techn...
Symphony
TRIPLE PLAY UKIAH SYMPHONY CONCERT AND TCHAIKOVSKY SERENADE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 27, 2019
Over the years the Ukiah Symphony’s concerts have been in the Classical Sonoma Calendar sections, but rarely has this Orchestra, now in its 39th season, had a full winter season concert review. The provocative Jan. 27 program in Mendocino College’s Center Theater seemed a good reason to reacquaint ...
Symphony
JACKSON THEATER WELCOMES A NEW RESIDENT ORCHESTRA
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, January 26, 2019
Moving to a permanent new performance venue can be a perilous undertaking for an orchestra, with different acoustics, the loyal audience finding the new spot and infrastructure challenges of lighting and lobby and backstage operations. In their first concert Jan. 26 in Windsor’s Jackson Theater the...
Symphony
ECLECTIC PASSIONATE PROGRAMMING AT MARIN SYMPHONY CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, January 26, 2019
The Marin Symphony’s second Masterworks concert of the 2018-19 season featured works by John Adams, Sibelius and Brahms, a masterful assembly. In a spoken introduction before the program’s first half, conductor Alasdair Neale primed the audience for the “terra incognita” of Adams’ The Chairman Dance...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Santa Rosa Symphony / Monday, January 28, 2008
Bruno Ferrandis, conducting
Joseph Edelberg, violin

Joseph Edelberg

OUR AVIAN ROOTS

by Steve Osborn
Monday, January 28, 2008

In pursuit of the dragon Fafner, the mythical hero Siegfried pauses to hear the forest murmur, tries to imitate a bird, gives up, gets hold of a fiddle instead, plays until the moon rises, then buckles himself to the dragon's tail for a wild ride through the firmament. That, more or less, was the synopsis for the Santa Rosa Symphony's Jan. 28 concert at the Wells Fargo Center.

Although the symphony played four diverse pieces from three different centuries, including the present one, the compositional similarities were more striking than the contrasts. Each piece evoked a sylvan landscape, often using that most primordial of musical phrases: bird call. The call is explicit in Wagner's "Forest Murmurs," which opened the program, and nearly as much in Mendelssohn's "Italian" symphony, which closed it two hours later. In between were some distinctly avian melodies in Bach's E major violin concerto and a veritable chorus of two- and three-note calls in George Tsontakis's magical "Clair de Lune."

The Tsontakis was the highlight of the evening. Premiered just last year by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, the piece consists of two movements: "Moonlit" and "Mischievous--Lullaby." As explained by Maestro Bruno Ferrandis in a brief but insightful introduction, the first movement, with its whole-tone scales and coloristic devices, evokes Debussy; whereas the second, full of joy and jubilation, evokes Messiaen. These pillars of French composition are only a point of reference, however, for Tsontakis has a voice that is distinctly his own: a "free spirit," in his friend Ferrandis's judgment.

The 20-minute piece begins with winds articulating two-note phrases, either ascending or descending, conjuring up a waking forest of birds. The strings then enter on an ascending whole-tone scale, creating a lush sonic landscape ripe for melody, which is eventually supplied in turn by an oboe and a solo violin. The texture throughout is alternately shimmering and dense, like the lunar lighting of the title. The effect was eerie and often mesmerizing.

The second movement was equally delightful, beginning with heavy syncopations and a rock-solid beat, thanks to Ferrandis, that evoked the driving rhythms of the Jazz Age. Short bursts of sound, repeated and varied, were combined like sonic strands of DNA, each new combination assuming a different form of musical life. Climaxes and cadences followed in rapid succession, finally building up to a truly swinging orchestra.

Ferrandis is to be commended for including new works on most of his programs. Based on what he's played so far this season, 21st-century classical music is alive and well; as is 19th-century music, in the person of Felix Mendelssohn. Still flush with the exhilaration of the Tsontakis, the orchestra plunged right into the Italian Symphony, with its familiar pair of opening thirds: dah-dee-dah, dah-dee-dah. Or is that opening birds? The early e-mail program Eudora used to announce new mail with an image of a rooster and an alert sound lifted straight from Mendelssohn. The connection with the earlier bird calls was unmistakable.

The subsequent development, however, was a world apart. Ferrandis is an almost ideal Mendelssohn conductor, with precise, well-engineered movements that bring out all the intricate qualities of the composer's lapidary scores. Every section is exactly in place; the beat is unvarying; the crescendos and decrescendos elegant and smooth. Whereas other conductors get overwhelmed by the mechanism and tradition, Ferrandis infused energy and life into a symphony played for perhaps the millionth time, with many million left to go.

Each movement was remarkable in its own way, from the clarion calls and the great unison strings in the first, to the elegiac march of the second and the superb horn duet in the third. It was amusing to watch Ferrandis's feet as he waltzed back and forth across the podium, his toes almost as expressive as his fingers. The climax, needless to say, came in the last movement, where Ferrandis really pushed the tempo, verging into prestissimo. Amazingly, everyone hung in there, particularly the strings, whose intonation was virtually flawless. A magnificent performance.

The efforts in the first half were less inspired, although the music itself was of considerable interest. The program began with the "Forest Murmurs" sequence from Wagner's opera Siegfried. Once again, bird calls dominated, with flutes, clarinets, and oboes assuming various avian personalities above a murmuring bed of strings. The horns, unfortunately, were somewhat out of tune, so the operatic picture never came into full focus. What was most incongruous, however, was the sight of Ferrandis conducting all of this from a miniature score the size of a paperback novel. Maybe it was the version for puppet opera.

The reduction in size continued with the Bach E major violin concerto. Many players left the stage, leaving just 24 strings, a harpsichord, and the soloist, concertmaster Joseph Edelberg. His performance, though full of insight, was often tense, perhaps because of his unfamiliar role in front of the orchestra rather than within it. Nonetheless, he shaped passages in the opening movement in unusual ways, bringing out notes and phrases that are normally hidden. He seemed to relax more in the unhurried second movement, as Ferrandis coaxed an ethereal sound out of the orchestra's reduced forces. Perhaps because the "Forest Murmurs" were still in the air, the movement seemed to continue the sylvan and avian themes. Finally, the sprightly third movement brought the first half to a satisfying conclusion, rounded out by warm applause.