Home  Reviews  Articles  Calendar  Presenters  Add Event     
Symphony
SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY STAYS CLOSE TO HOME
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, March 26, 2017
Santa Rosa Symphony concerts usually feature high-powered soloists imported from afar, but for their recent “Bring on the Strings” concert set, they stuck close to home, thrusting their principal violin, viola and cello into the limelight. The violinist (Joseph Edelberg) and the violist (Elizabeth P...
Recital
SLAM BANG SONORITY IN HAOCHEN ZHANG'S SCHROEDER RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 19, 2017
Piano Competition winners are in ample supply, and it’s often a hit and miss proposition as to their sterling interpretative qualities. However, the quadrennial Van Cliburn Competition in Ft. Worth has continually produced top-level artists, and the 2009 winner Haochen Zhang proved a formidable per...
Symphony
FOREIGN AFFAIRS CHARACTERS OF THE BAROQUE
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, March 12, 2017
Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin, known as Akamus, played a Weill Hall concert March 12 in a program called "Foreign Affairs -Characters of the Baroque.” The ensemble, that began in 1984, has 15 musicians led by concert master Bernhard Forck. Attired in elegant black with red accents, ranging from tie...
Recital
MUSCULAR PIANISM DOMINATES MILL VALLEY CHAMBER SOCIETY RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 12, 2017
Piano recitals since the beginning of the genre open with finger pieces - Scarlatti or Soler Sonatas, Bach, a Mendelssohn Prelude and Fugue or perhaps Mozart or Haydn. Sarah Daneshpour’s March 12 opening work at the Mill Valley Chamber Music Society series abruptly avoided the norm with the 10-minut...
Recital
NOVEL HAYDN AND SCHUMANN IN YARDEN'S OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, March 09, 2017
Israeli pianist Einav Yarden has been a frequent Sonoma County visitor, playing private recitals for Spring Lake Village and Concerts Grand, and twice performing for Music at Oakmont. The Berlin-based artist returned to Oakmont’s Berger Auditorium March 9 with a program that was neither for connois...
Chamber
CONSUMMATE ENSEMBLE FROM THE MIRÓ IN WEILL
by Sonia Tubridy and Nicki Bell
Sunday, March 05, 2017
A March 5 Weill hall audience of 350 leaned in to share an intimate musical space and to hear the Miró String Quartet’s sterling concert. Starting with Haydn's Op. 20, No. 4, the four musicians seemed to want listeners to be enveloped in their music. The Miró plays with the feat of being four dist...
Recital
BRILLIANT VIOLIN AND PIANO ARTISTRY CHARMS SCHROEDER HALL AUDIENCE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 26, 2017
A tiny Schroeder Hall audience heard a flawless recital Feb. 26 by Yu-Chien Tseng, arguably the best recent local violin recital since Gil Shaham’s transversal of the complete Bach Suites in Weill and Frank Almond’s Oakmont recital in 2015. Muscular playing was the afternoon’s norm, and with pianis...
Chamber
MUSIC AND ART MELD IN ZUCKERMAN TRIO CONCERT
by Nicki Bell
Friday, February 24, 2017
A Feb. 24 Weill Hall concert by the Pinchas Zuckerman Trio juxtaposed formidable music making with palpable associations about visual art. Brahms’ C Minor "Sonatensatz” (Scherzo) is a short youthful work for violin and piano, and was an opening call to action. Lively and vigorous playing alternated...
Chamber
THREE BEETHOVEN TRIOS BEGUILE AUDIENCE IN FEB. 19 WEILL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 19, 2017
Chamber music concerts featuring one composer can be tricky, but the Han/Setzer/Finckel trio made a Feb. 19 Weill Hall audience of 500 hear and to a degree see the boundless creativity of Beethoven. The G Major Trio, Op. 1, No. 2, opened the afternoon’s Beethoven odyssey and one wonders why it is t...
Chamber
AUTHORITATIVE BARTOK HIGHLIGHTS TETZLAFF VIOLIN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, February 18, 2017
Christian Tetzlaff’s Feb. 18 violin recital rolled along with lively and fresh readings of Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert when the specter of Bartok’s granitic Second Sonata intervened. The sonic shock to the audience of 250 in Weill was palpable. Composed in 1923 the 20-minute two-movement work i...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Ukiah Symphony / Sunday, May 15, 2011
Ukiah Symphony Orchestra
Les Pfutzenreuter, conductor
Elena Casanova, piano

Conductor Les Pfutzenreuter Leads Applause for Pianist Elena Casanova May 15

ENERGETIC RUSSIAN WORKS END UKIAH SYMPHONY SEASON AT MENDOCINO COLLEGE

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 15, 2011

Balances in an orchestral concert, especially works from just one nation’s composers, are tough to graciously achieve. The Ukiah Symphony’s closing concert May 15 was heavily weighted with boisterous Russian works, and balances to some degree proved to be a concert-long problem.

Somehow a quiet piece slipped in to begin the event, Borodin’s tone poem “In The Steps of Central Asia,” and it was beautifully played. Principal flutist Becky Ayers and principal horn Ben Robinson had the lush opening themes and the tempos chosen by music director Les Pfutzenreuter were judicious. The brass had the requisite sonic punch, something they would need all afternoon.

Works by Khachaturian completed the first half, both muscular and pleasing to the audience of 350 in Mendocino College’s Center Theater. The ubiquitous Saber Dance in G Major (from the ballet “Gayane”) was first, the opening ostinato from timpanist Gabriel Sakakeeny telling and setting up whirlwind playing from the strings. It was mostly loud, raucous and though a pop favorite, heavily applauded. The equally potent Piano Concerto in D-Flat Major, Op. 38, continued the Orchestra’s penchant for sonic fireworks. Slow tempos were again selected and soloist Elena Casanova, playing from score, was in complete sympathy with Mr. Pfutzenreuter’s baton. Ms. Casanova’s octave technique, elfin scales and lyrical phrasing in the opening Allegro were effective, but often she was more seen than heard. The balance between the orchestra and the piano in this raw-boned work worked against the soloist, the horns and timpani often covering the piano line. The conductor sporadically tried to quiet things down, but it’s that kind of piece and the Symphony had mostly free reign. String sound throughout was very good save for raspy viola playing.

The lovely introduction to the Andante con anima was played by what I think was a bass clarinet, presumably in Erick Van Dyke’s capable hands, and the piano cadenza was characteristically insistent and artfully crafted. A novel instrument, an electronic wave length Theremin, had a negligible part and was played by Francis Rutherford.

The balances improved in the finale (Allegro) and the pianist’s right-hand skips and left-hand crossovers were always accurate. The jazz influence was underscored by the conductor and Ms. Casanova’s projection seemed to be getting stronger as the movement unfolded, her concentration riveting up to the final five dissonant chords. The Concerto is something one would hesitate to listen to every day, but a wild ovation indicated that the audience would perhaps have liked it again. There was no encore. Does the Ukiah Symphony encourage an encore from a soloist? The practice was essentially prohibited by orchestra management for decades, but now it is fairly common, and nearly always heard in Santa Rosa, Marin and Napa Valley Symphony concerts.

Mention needs to be made that the concert piano was positioned stage front at the beginning of the concert, thus saving setup time between the two Khachaturian pieces. Many orchestras still don’t do this and the Symphony stage manager is to be thanked for moving things along.

By far the best work Sunday occupied the entire second half, Stravinsky’s Suite from the ballet Firebird. As in many of the great Russian’s works (e. g., the Symphony of Psalms, the 1924 Piano Sonata) the bold rhythmic patterns are immediately established and in diverse ways carry through the five parts. Several parts melded together under the conductor’s direction, and here again the tempos were never rushed, the masterful orchestration always distinct. Stravinsky wasn’t a student of Rimsky for nothing. In the section “The Princesses’ Khorovod” there were fetching successive solos by oboist Beth Aiken, cellist Clovice Lewis, clarinetist Van Dyke and French horn player Mr. Robinson, over string tremolos. Mr. Pfutzenreuter was also able to coax some captivating pianissimos from his players.

The “Infernal Dance” part brought out some fine ensemble playing, albeit with the horns struggling to keep up. The fast parts found the conductor using a bevy of cues to keep all the sonic lines together. It was a convincing performance and surely a highlight of the season.

At intermission long-time Board member and section violinist Mary Carnevale was honored for her years of service (she is moving from Ukiah) and Mr. Pfutzenreuter made an impassioned speech for support of the arts program at Mendocino College, currently threatened by draconian budget cuts.