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Recital
PERLMAN TRIUMPHS IN LOW TEMPERATURE SOLD OUT WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, September 15, 2019
Itzhak Perlman did a rare thing for a classical musician in his Sept. 15 recital – he sold out Weill Hall’s 1,400 seats, with 50 more on stage. Clearly the violinist has an adoring local audience that came to hear him perform with pianist Rohan De Silva in a concert of two substantial sonatas mixed...
Recital
TRANSCRIPTIONS ABOUND IN GALBRAITH'S GUITAR RECITAL
by Gary Digman
Saturday, September 14, 2019
Master guitarist Paul Galbraith’s artistry was much in evidence Sept. 14 in his Sebastopol Community Church recital. Attendees in the Redwood Arts Council events were initially bothered by the afternoon’s heat in the church, but it was of small importance when the Cambridge, England-based artist be...
Recital
ECLECTIC DRAMATIC PROGRAMING IN SPRING LAKE VILLAGE RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Marin-based pianist Laura Magnani combined piquant remarks to an audience of 100 Sept. 11 with dramatic music making in a recital at Spring Lake Village’s Montgomery Center. Ms. Magnani’s eclectic programming in past SLV recitals continued, beginning with three sonatas by her Italian compatriot Sca...
Chamber
PERFORMER AS PROMOTER: CLARA SCHUMANN AND MUSICAL SALONS CLOSE VOM FESTIVAL
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, July 28, 2019
The July 28 closing performance of the Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival could have been subtitled "Friends", as it was devoted to works by both Clara and Robert Schumann, and those of their friends and protégés Brahms and virtuoso violinist Joseph Joachim, with whom Clara toured extensively...
Chamber
ROMANTIC CHAMBER WORKS HIGHLIGHT VOM FESTIVAL AT HANNA CENTER
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 27, 2019
Now in its 5th season the Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival presented July 27 a concert titled “My Brilliant Sister,” featuring Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel’s compositions for combinations of voice, fortepiano and strings. Fanny and her brother Felix were close, and Felix occasionally published ...
Symphony
ROMANTIC DREAMS AT THE MENDOCINO MUSIC FESTIVAL
by Kayleen Asbo
Wednesday, July 24, 2019
Romanticism, contrary to many popular perceptions, wasn’t simply about diving into the habitat of the heart. Romanticism began as a literary movement that elevated the power of nature as a transcendent force and sought with keen nostalgia to rediscover the wisdom of the past. The Romantics in both l...
Chamber
CHAUSSON CONCERTO SHINES IN A VISIONARY'S SALON
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, July 21, 2019
Ernest Chausson’s four-movement Concerto in D Major for Violin, Piano, and String Quartet (1891) is neither concerto nor sonata nor symphony, but it somehow manages to be all three, especially when played with fire and conviction by an accomplished soloist. Those incendiary and emotional elements w...
Chamber
EUROPEAN SALON MUSIC CAPTIVATES AT VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, July 21, 2019
Two stunning programs of 19th and 20th century chamber music were presented on July 21 and 28 as part of the Valley of the Moon Music Festival at the Hanna Center in Sonoma. Festival founders and directors pianist Eric Zivian and cellist Tanya Tompkins were both on hand to contribute brilliantly at ...
Chamber
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL COMBINATIONS IN VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 20, 2019
A Lovely summer afternoon in Sonoma Valley, an excellent small concert hall, enthusiastic audience, exciting musicians and creative programming with interesting story lines. All these were combined July 20 at a Valley of the Moon Festival concert titled “An Italian in Paris.” This is the fifth seaso...
Opera
'ELIXIR' A WELCOME TONIC IN SPRIGHTLY ANNUAL MMF OPERA
by Terry McNeill
Friday, July 19, 2019
In most of the Mendocino Music Festival’s 33 seasons a single evening is given over to a staged opera, with bare bones sets, lighting, costumes, minimal cast and short length. No Wagner or Verdi here, no multiple acts and complicated production demands. Light and frothy are the usual, and so it wa...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Santa Rosa Symphony / Saturday, November 03, 2012
Bruno Ferrandis, conductor; Jean Philippe Collard, piano

Pianist Jean Philippe Collard

SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY: HEAR AND NOW

by Steve Osborn
Saturday, November 03, 2012

For the long-suffering patrons of the Santa Rosa Symphony, the acoustics at the new Green Music Center have come as a true revelation. To be fair, the Symphony’s former venue — the Wells Fargo Center — was never intended as a concert hall. It began life as a New Age church, complete with low ceilings, wall-to-wall carpeting, and a sound system designed for uplifting sermons and Christian rock. To hear the Symphony play there was like observing it at the bottom of an elevator shaft and contenting yourself with whatever sounds managed to reach your ears.

In delightful contrast, the acoustics at the GMC bring every orchestral peep and bow stroke straight to your auditory canal, where they burst into flavor, like fine wine on your palate. Under these new circumstances, the Symphony — which sounded pretty good even at the Wells Fargo — is revealed to be a truly wonderful local orchestra, with some standout players who would be right at home in major-league ensembles in New York, Chicago, or San Francisco.

Just how good is the Santa Rosa band? Judging from its all-French program Saturday at the GMC, the answer is “fantastique.” Whether it can approach its San Francisco cousins in talent will be a matter of much debate when the latter ensemble travels to the GMC next month. In the meantime, North Bay music lovers can revel in their orchestra’s newfound sonic brilliance.

That brilliance was on particular display in the third movement of Berlioz’s “Symphonie Fantastique,” the concluding piece on a program that also embraced works by Saint-Saëns and the contemporary composer Martin Matalon. The movement began with a gorgeous duet between English hornist Bennie Cottone and off-stage oboist Laura Reynolds. The sound of each instrument was crystalline, floating through the air like the cooings of a pair of mourning doves. The orchestral accompaniment, when it arrived, was by turns a babbling brook or a raging torrent, with the dynamics and velocity pirouetting at a moment’s notice. The ensuing clarinet solo by Roy Zajac was elegant, and the concluding dialogue between English horn and timpani was mesmerizing.

From start to finish, the performance of “Symphonie Fantastique” was an object lesson is orchestral expressivity. Music Director Bruno Ferrandis, restraining himself to a podium that seems much too small for his dancelike gestures, was in perpetual motion, producing strong dynamic contrasts throughout Berlioz’ masterpiece. The beginning was hushed, with great sound from the basses. The inevitable crescendo was both energetic and shapely, culminating in a convincing display of orchestral might, particularly from the violins.

The second-movement waltz was fresh as well as lilting, with brisk tempos and fully engaged players. The clarinet duet near the end was especially charming, leading to a smattering of applause. After the gorgeous middle movement, the fourth and fifth movements made for a long cascade of increasingly dense and frantic sound. The famous “march to the scaffold” in the fourth was marked by strong contrasts and quickening tempo. The fifth, with its bass drums, orchestral bells, and relentless “Dies Irae” theme, was a headlong rush to ecstasy. Every section of the orchestra sounded terrific, nowhere more so than when the strings suddenly began playing “col legno,” hitting their instruments with their bows. It was a signature moment in an inspired performance.

The performances in the first half were likewise inspired, even if the music was not. The evening began with Martin Matalon’s “De tiempo y de metal” (Of time and of metal), which premiered in 2010 at the Abbey of Noirlac in France. Matalon, an Argentine who lives in Paris, conceived the piece, which is scored for a dozen brass instruments, as a kind of homage to the antiphonal works that Gabrieli and other 16th-century composers wrote for St. Mark’s in Venice. Indeed, the Santa Rosa musicians prefaced their performance with a quick spin through Gabrieli’s “Song for First Tones,” dated 1597.

The players were arranged on the stage somewhat antiphonally, with a pair of trumpets on each side, four French horns clustered in the middle, and three trombones and a tuba dispersed betwixt and between. The piece began quietly, with muted fast runs from the trumpets punctuated by occasional blats from the tuba. There seemed to be as much silence as sound, yet the silences were filled with the hypnotic stroke of Mr. Ferrandis’ baton, which kept a steady beat throughout.

“De tiempo y de metal” lived up to its title, with both a strong temporal element and an inventive exploration of the sounds made by metal instruments, from rushing wind to full-throated roar. The ending was effective, as were certain sections, but the piece mostly sounded academic, more concerned with cataloging possibilities than harnessing them to something larger.

Similar problems afflicted the Piano Concerto No. 2 by Camille Saint-Saëns, ably performed by Jean-Philippe Collard. Saint-Saëns suffered from an excess of facility, the notes pouring from his pen in an unending stream of Romantic abandon. His second piano concerto, the only one of five performed with any regularity, features a captivating scherzo in the middle, but the outer movements are a continuous blur of notes without any definite direction, an overwhelming sauce that drowns the dinner beneath.

Collard proved himself capable of playing any notes Saint-Saëns threw his way, from the resonant bass chords at the beginning of the first movement, to the many descending cascades in the middle and to the long cadenza at the end. He used lots of pedal and made a prodigious sound, more than matching the orchestra in volume. He seemed to grow stronger as the concerto wore on, building up some genuine excitement in the concluding movement, but in the end Saint-Saëns lies beneath his talent. A better concerto would have made a good concert great.

[Reprinted with permission from San Francisco Classical Voice.]