Home  Reviews  Articles  Calendar  Presenters  Add Event     
Symphony
CONDUCTOR PLAYOFFS BEGIN IN SANTA ROSA
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, October 08, 2017
The Santa Rosa Symphony is calling 2017-18 “a choice season” because the next few months offer the audience and the symphony’s board of directors a chance to choose a new conductor from a pool of five candidates. Each candidate will lead a three-concert weekend set this fall and winter, with a final...
Symphony
DVORAK AND TCHAIKOVSKY ORCHESTRAL COLOR AT SO CO PHIL SEASON OPENER
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, September 30, 2017
A concert with curious repertoire and splashy orchestral color launched the 19th season of the Sonoma County Philharmonic Sept. 30 in Santa Rosa High School’s Auditorium. Why curious? Conductor Norman Gamboa paired the ever-popular Dvorak and his rarely heard 1891 trilogy In Nature’s Realm, with t...
Recital
ELEGANT PIANISM IN WATER MUSIC CHARMS HOUSE RECITAL AUDIENCE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, September 03, 2017
A standard component of house concerts often involve listeners hearing the music but also smelling the lasagna and seeing the champagne in the adjacent kitchen. But it was not the case Sept. 3 at Sandra Shen’s Concerts Grand House Recital performance, as her riveting piano playing enthralled the sm...
Chamber
YOUNG MUSICIANS SHINE AT PIANO SONOMA CONCERT
by Lee Ormasa
Tuesday, August 01, 2017
The third in a series of four concerts by Piano Sonoma artists in residence, part of the Vino and Vibrato Series, was held August 1 in Schroeder Hall at the Green Music Center. Entitled “The Masters,” the program included works by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and Haydn. Piano Sonoma is a summer artist-in...
Chamber
THRILLING PROGRAM CLOSES VOM CHAMBER FESTIVAL AT HANNA CENTER
by Lee Ormasa
Sunday, July 30, 2017
The finale of the two-week Valley of the Moon Music Festival closed July 30 with “The Age of Bravura” concert at the Sonoma’s Hanna Boys Center. The musical selections held to this year’s Festival theme “Schumann’s World - His Music and the Music He Loved.“ This summer Festival features chamber mus...
Chamber
PERIOD INSTRUMENTAL SOUND AT PENULTIMATE VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, July 30, 2017
In the Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival’s penultimate concert July 30 the perennial issue of period and modern instruments was apparent. But only in the concluding Mendelssohn Trio, as the performances in the two first half works easily avoided instrumental comparisons. Clara Schumann’s t...
Chamber
ECLECTIC REPERTOIRE IN FETCHING VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, July 22, 2017
One of the purposes of summer music festivals is to present unfamiliar music in an attractive and often small audience setting. The Valley of the Moon Music Festival delightfully met these requirements July 22 and 23 with two concerts in the small hall at Sonoma’s Hanna Boys Center. Classical Sono...
Recital
ADAMS' PHRYGIAN GATES HIGHLIGHTS MORKOSKI FESTIVAL PERFORMANCE
by Lee Ormasa
Saturday, July 22, 2017
Attendees at the Molly Morkoski Mendocino Music Festival recital July 22 were in for a treat, both pianistically and if they happened to buy a tasty cookie during intermission. The program included Beethoven’s Op. 27 Moonlight Sonata, Adams’ Phrygian Gates, a surprise add-on of Grieg’s Holberg Suit...
Symphony
SOARING VERDI REQUIEM CLOSES 31ST MENDOCINO FESTIVAL
by Lee Ormasa
Saturday, July 22, 2017
We speak frequently about how there is nothing like the experience of a live performance. Seldom was this truer than at the July 22 closing performance of the two-week Mendocino Music Festival. The Festival Orchestra, conducted by of Allan Pollack, joined with the Festival Chorus in a moving renderi...
Recital
ORGAN REGISTRATION MASTERY HEARD IN WALHAIN'S RECITAL
by Robert Young
Tuesday, July 18, 2017
A group of 65 lucky attendees July 18 had the pleasure of hearing Etienne Walhain’s recital at the Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa. Mr. Walhain is organist at the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Tournai, Belgium, and played to a varied program Bach, Franck, and Reger. He used the tonal resource...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Parker Quartet / Friday, February 15, 2013
Daniel Chong and David McCarroll, violin;
Jessica Bodner, viola; Kee-Hyun Kim, cello

Parker String Quartet

SOLID GOLD FROM THE PARKER STRING QUARTET

by Steve Osborn
Friday, February 15, 2013

Santa Rosa has been blessed with three superlative chamber music concerts during the past month, beginning with the Calder String Quartet in late January, followed by the Alexander String Quartet with violist Toby Appel in early February, and culminating with the Parker String Quartet one day after Valentine's Day. Choosing among the three ensembles is a difficult task, but I think the gold would ultimately go to the Parker, which proved itself capable of playing even the most difficult music with precision and élan.

Sadly, the Glaser Center in downtown Santa Rosa was only about half full for the Grammy-winning Parkers, but that didn't seem to dampen the musicians' or the audience's enthusiasm. All four members of the quartet, each one more youthful than the other, played as if on fire from the opening note to the last. The opening work, appropriately enough, was from the ever-youthful Mozart, one of his six "Milanese" quartets, written when he was a teenager. This one, K. 156, is in G Major.

The inner voices in the quartet--second violinist David McCarroll and violist Jessica Bodner--instantly established themselves as a force to be reckoned with, playing out their lines in equipoise with their outer brethren: first violinist Daniel Chong and cellist Kee-Hyun Kim. (During the current season, Mr. McCarroll is replacing regular second violinist Karen Kim, who is on sabbatical.) As is often the case with Mozart, the slow movement was the most riveting section, and the Parker played it as if it were one of the composer's mature works, bringing out its exquisite lines and delicate counterpoint.

In brief remarks after the Mozart, Mr. McCarroll said he was glad to be home (he grew up in Sonoma County) and that the just-played quartet and the Dvorak quartet to come in the second half were relatively obscure works. The true center of the program, according to him, was the impending Debussy string quartet, a fixture in the repertoire since its premiere in 1893. The performance that followed demonstrated not only why the Debussy has become canonic, but also how much more this masterpiece still has to offer.

To hear the Parker play the Debussy quartet was nothing short of a revelation. In the first movement all the familiar lines and turns of phrase took on new meaning when played with such precision and understanding. The playing was assured from the opening measures, when opulent legatos gave way to sharply articulated retakes (repeated down-bows). Words such as "flawless," "lapidary" and "impeccable" can only begin to describe the seamless blending, the sudden dynamic changes and the emotive playing, particularly from Mr. Chong.

Ms. Bodner took center stage in the second movement, playing all 13 iterations of her 13-note phrase as if each was a distinct event. In contrast to Mr. Chong's emotive swaying, she held herself aloof, letting her fingers dance across her instrument of their own accord. Her tone was absolutely gorgeous. The movement, marked "lively and rhythmic," seemed to float above the earth like a scudding cloud, with sudden thunder from the cello adding a touch of drama.

The slow third movement continued the gorgeous sound, and here again Mr. Chong captivated the audience as he sang out his expressive lines. When the final movement began, one could only sit back and be entranced by the sparkling musicianship from all four corners of the stage. The ending came all too soon.

Dvorak and Debussy both begin with the same letter, but there the similarity more or less ends. Debussy was a musical revolutionary, but Dvorak was content to use the existing forms and imbue them with his own optimistic style. His eleventh string quartet in C Major, Opus 61, closely resembles his dozen or so other quartets, with an Allegro opening movement, an Adagio second, a minuet-style third and a Vivace conclusion. The melodies are bright and open, and the feeling is often happy and buoyant.

There was absolutely nothing wrong with the Dvorak, but it sounded tame in comparison with the Debussy. Dvorak's technique is more limited, his imagination less captivating. Nonetheless, the performance was exhilarating. Mr. Chong drove forward with breathtaking speed; Mr. McCarroll sang out whenever the opportunity presented; Ms. Bodner reveled in the many viola solos (Dvorak was a violist); and cellist Kim provided a rock-solid foundation throughout. They were as much fun to watch as they were to hear.

At the end, the only regret was that more people weren't there to hear this magnificent group, which had been brought to town through the auspices of the Redwood Arts Council. The Glaser Center is an excellent venue for chamber music, and it's centrally located, with plenty of parking. There's even a friendly lobby with food and drink during intermission. What's not to like?