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Chamber
FINAL VOM MUSICIANS CONCERT IN SCHROEDER A SCHUBERT DELIGHT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, May 12, 2018
It's rare to have the opportunity to compare in a short period two performances of the same major Schubert work, in this case the great B Flat Piano Trio, D. 898. The chance came May 12 when the Valley of the Moon Festival musicians played it in Schroeder, just over a month since the Hallís residen...
Symphony
FERRANDIS BIDS ADIEU WITH MAHLERíS FINAL SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 06, 2018
Sonoma State students in graduation robes posed for pictures and hugged each other at the universityís stone gates on Sunday afternoon, mirroring the prolonged farewells within the universityís Green Music Center, where Bruno Ferrandis bid adieu to the Santa Rosa Symphony after a dozen years at the ...
Symphony
SONIC SPLENDOR AT MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Abby Wasserman
Tuesday, May 01, 2018
The Marin Symphony Orchestra ended the current season with a flourish, interpreting big and small works by Richard Strauss and Stravinsky. Strauss and Stravinsky were contemporaries for 40 years, but inhabited different worlds. Both composers were affected by cataclysmic changes and war, and musical...
Symphony
ORGAN SYMPHONY IN SSU ORCHESTRA CONCERT IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 29, 2018
Though Classical Sonoma seldom reviews student concerts, as ample North Coast concerts keep the staff of 11 reviewers busy. But the chance to hear the Sonoma State University Orchestra tackle St. SaŽnsí majestic Organ Symphony April 29 was a rare opportunity and not easily to be missed. Avec lí...
Recital
HEAVENLY SCHUBERT AND DEMONIC CHOPIN
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, April 21, 2018
One of the anomalies in the long ago ďGolden EraĒ of romantic pianism (about 1905 to 1940) is that the virtuoso giants of the time didnít play Schubert. It took the German pianist Artur Schnabel to bring the beauties of Schuberís work to the publicís attention, and now they seem to be on almost ever...
Symphony
SPLENDID JUPITER AND ZOOMING CONCERTO AT VALLEJO SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 15, 2018
Over the past two years the Vallejo Symphony has made big changes, moving from a stark middle school auditorium to the snazzy remodeled 1911-era downtown Empress Theater, and engaging Marc Taddei as its seventh conductor. April 15 was the seasonís final concert of the 86th season. In a programmin...
Chamber
VIRTUOSO CELLO AND GUITAR TRANSCRIPTIONS AT RAC SEBASTOPOL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, April 14, 2018
Listeners and yes even music critics usually prepare for a concert with research, checking recorded performances, looking at artist biographies and even reviewing sheet music. This was a difficult task for the April 14 Redwood Arts Council concert in Sebastopolís Community Church, as the performers...
Chamber
TRIO NAVARRO'S POPULAR FARE IN SCHROEDER HALL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 08, 2018
Long time Classical Sonoma readers may recall many Trio Navarro concert reviews that lauded their virtuosity and interest in rarely played repertoire. The April 8 concert in Schroeder Hall before 85 chamber music fans featured sterling performances but had a mostly conservative menu of popular trio...
Recital
KENNER'S ALL POLISH RECITAL HAS PADEREWSKI RARITY
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, April 08, 2018
Kevin Kennerís April 8 recital at Dominican Universityís Angelico Hall had been advertised as all-Chopin, but he added a detour into another seminal Polish composer-pianist, Paderewski. Several of Mr. Kennerís teachers were Poles, he speaks Polish, and he navigated at the piano both composersí deman...
Symphony
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE VOICE AT SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, April 08, 2018
In an April 8 Santa Rosa Symphony concert filled to the brim with instruments--electric violin, vibraphone, marimba, xylophone, glockenspiel, keyboard samplers, harps, piano and myriad drums, gongs and bells, to say nothing of winds, brass and strings--the instrument that came out on top was the hum...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Mastercard Performance Series / Saturday, April 27, 2013
Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. Jeffrey Kahane, conductor and piano

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra

FULL CIRCLE FOR KAHANE

by Steve Osborn
Saturday, April 27, 2013

Since the conclusion of his decade-long tenure with the Santa Rosa Symphony in 2006, conductor laureate Jeffrey Kahane has traveled widely, but he has often circled back to Sonoma County as a piano soloist. On Saturday evening, April 27, he upped the ante by not only bringing his prodigious keyboard talents back to the Green Music Center in Rohnert Park, but also his own ensemble, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra.

A chamber orchestra in name only, LACO generates a powerful sound, which proved more than adequate for filling every nook and cranny of the GMC's nearly full Weill Hall. The orchestra includes almost every instrument found in a full-blown symphony, but with fewer players on a part, particularly in the strings. There are, for example, only four cellos and four violas. The reduced sections bring the total players to around 40, about half the number found in larger orchestras.

The loss of volume from fewer players is more than made up for by LACO's dexterity, unanimity and all-around great sound. Every member of the ensemble is a potential soloist. Indeed, in the brand-new "Music in Circles III" by contemporary composer Andrew Norman, each one got a chance to be an actual soloist, however briefly.

That piece began the second half of the program, after an informative introduction from Kahane, an inveterate proselytizer for modern music. As he explained, LACO had premiered the piece just the week before and had already played it several times, including a performance to an auditorium filled with grade-school children, who had listened with rapt attention.

As Kahane observed, "Music in Circles" is really about the act of listening. It begins in dead silence. In turn, the various instruments in the orchestra make short, expressive sounds. A violinist, for example, plays harmonics, whereas a violist bounces his bow off a string. Throughout this spare introduction, Kahane held out his fingers to count off the solos.

Gradually (and predictably), all the instruments joined in, creating a dense sound that hovered around a tonal center without going anywhere in particular. Kahane's metronomic arm motions became a major focus of the piece, as he kept everyone together in the intricate but evanescent cloud of noise. A long decrescendo ensued, giving the piece the familiar soft-loud-soft structure that can be summarized with two sideways Vs: <>.

Whatever the merits of "Music in Circles," the performance was beguiling. With one possible exception, the musicians played their solos with aplomb, and the texture of the sound seemed to pull the audience in--perhaps not as completely as the grade schoolers, but close enough.

Earlier in the evening, the concert began at the other end of the musical timescale with a captivating, Kahane-less performance of Handel's Concerto Grosso, Op. 6, No. 11. Led by concertmistress Margaret Batjer, a scaled-down ensemble of about a dozen standing violin, viola and bass players--along with two seated cellists and a harpsichordist--zipped through the Baroque master's charming reworking of one his own organ concertos.

Batjer immediately established herself as a solid player with shimmering technique and authoritative bowing. Although her body movements were restrained, she brought the entire ensemble along with her: every eye within sight was glued to her bow. The five-movement concerto really caught fire in the concluding Allegro, propelled by a series of calls and responses from soloist to orchestra.

Afterward, Kahane and a lidless Steinway emerged from the wings to perform Mozart's beloved Piano Concerto No. 22. The orchestra--which now included a fuller complement of strings, winds and timpani--arranged itself around the piano. The keyboard faced the audience but was soon obscured by the seated Kahane, who rose to conduct whenever he wasn't playing.

The performance was everything one would expect from Kahane: fluid, virtuosic, lyrical, transcendent. The piano sound meshed well with the orchestra, floating above the stage rather than projecting outward. Kahane's own cadenza to the first movement was particularly memorable. Taking the liberty of a cadenza at face value, Kahane brought the timpanist into his improvisations, the drums offering a surprisingly effective restatement of the main theme.

As almost always in Mozart, the slow movement was the most endearing, nowhere more so here than in the various woodwind duets. The dark, almost tragic, mood stood in stark contrast to the outer movements. In the concluding Rondo, it was hard to believe that Kahane could play so quickly. His trills were relentless and his fingers a blur, but the phrasing was nonetheless exquisite. The standing ovation at the end was well deserved.

Another well-deserved ovation arrived at the end of the program, after Ginastera's "Variaciones concertantes," a heartfelt set of variations on Argentine themes. Composed in 1953, the piece has worn well over the last 60 years, a testament to the solidity of its melodies and the rewards of its structure.

"Variaciones concertantes" consists of a series of 11 mini-concertos for various instruments in the orchestra, followed by a rousing finale. It opens with a soulful duet between harp and cello, which spends almost all its time in the upper registers. The soloists here and throughout the piece were superb, but the real standout was violist Victoria Miskolczy, who made the most of her "Variacion dramatica" by producing a full-bodied sound of searing intensity.

In the end, the concert offered further proof--as if any were needed--of Kahane's stature as both performer and conductor. One can only hope that not too much time will pass before he circles back again to his musical home.