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Symphony
SONIC SPLASH AND ENSEMBLE DELICACY AT SO CO PHIL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 18, 2017
Franck’s wonderful D Minor Symphony is a rarity on today’s concert programs, and I can’t remember a North Bay performance in many years from any of the six resident area orchestras. So it was good to see the Sonoma County Philharmonic feature it in their Nov. 18 and 19 concerts at Santa Rosa High S...
Chamber
TETZLAFF QUARTET'S MASTERY IN MOZART AND SCHUBERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 11, 2017
German violin virtuoso Christian Tetzlaff presented a critically successful Weill Hall recital Feb. 18, and returned to the same venue Nov. 11 with his admirable Tetzlaff Quartet in a program of Berg, Schubert and Mozart. Clarity of ensemble has always been a hallmark of this Quartet, and contrapun...
Chamber
RAVISHING SHORT OPERAS FROM FRENCH TROUPE IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 10, 2017
Standard Weill Hall fall and winter classical programs are pretty routine – symphonic music, chamber, solo recitals – so it was a rare treat Nov. 10 when just two works from the 17th century were gloriously presented. With such specialized compositions, period performers with commanding authenticit...
Symphony
MEI-ANN CHEN PROVES A WORTHY CONTENDER FOR SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY CONDUCTING POST
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, November 05, 2017
These days the focus of Santa Rosa Symphony concerts is as much on the conductor candidates as on the soloists. This past weekend’s concerts featured the second of those candidates, Mei-Ann Chen, along with pianist Nareh Arghamanyan, each of whom cut an imposing figure on the stage. Chen is diminut...
Symphony
TO RUSSIA WITH BRILLIANCE
by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 03, 2017
Russian pianist Denis Matsuev’s high velocity and frequently slam-bang virtuosity came to the Green Music Center last year with a thrilling and equally perplexing solo performance. So many in Weill Nov. 3 were interested to hear if his pianistic style would mesh well in a concerto, and with a fine ...
Symphony
THUNDEROUS TCHAIKOVSKY FOURTH OPENS MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON
by Terry McNeill
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
North Coast weather is turning cool and the nights longer, ideal for Tchaikovsky’s big boned symphonies. The Santa Rosa Symphony recently programmed the Fourth (F Minor Symphony) as did the San Francisco Symphony. Norman Gamboa’s Sonoma County Philharmonic just played the Tchaikovsky First, forgoi...
Recital
RESPIGHI'S PUNGENT SONATA HIGHLIGHTS KENNEY-GUTMAN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 29, 2017
Respighi’s B Minor Violin Sonata seems never to gain conventional repertoire status. Perhaps the great Heifetz recording is intimidating, and I can recall over many years just two local performances: Jason Todorov and William Corbett-Jones years go in Newman, and a titanic reading in March by Anne S...
Chamber
MIRÓ QUARTET AND JEFFERY KAHANE PROVIDE MUSICAL RELIEF FOR FIRE-RAVAGED SONOMA COUNTY
by Steve Osborn
Saturday, October 28, 2017
Sonoma County’s Green Music Center has stood silent but unscathed the past few weeks as the county begins to recover from the devastating fires that began on the evening of October 8, only a few hours after a Santa Rosa Symphony concert in the Music Center. Since then, concerts by the Symphony, the ...
Symphony
CONDUCTOR PLAYOFFS BEGIN IN SANTA ROSA
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, October 08, 2017
The Santa Rosa Symphony is calling 2017-18 “a choice season” because the next few months offer the audience and the symphony’s board of directors a chance to choose a new conductor from a pool of five candidates. Each candidate will lead a three-concert weekend set this fall and winter, with a final...
Recital
PIANISTIC COMMAND IN SCHROEDER RECITAL
by Lee Ormasa
Sunday, October 08, 2017
Nikolay Khozyainov’s Oct. 8 debut at the Green Music Center’s Schroeder Hall was one of those rare moments in a young artist’s career when a performance approaches perfection. From the opening notes of Beethoven’s A-Flat Major Sonata (Op. 110) through a delightful recital ending transcription, the ...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
San Francisco Symphony / Thursday, May 23, 2013
David Robertson, conductor. Marc-Andre Hamelin, piano

Pianist Marc-Andre Hamelin

FIVE FINGERS WITH THE STRENGTH OF TEN

by Steve Osborn
Thursday, May 23, 2013

"My name is David, and I'm going to be your conductor for this evening." With that corny but amusing opening line, guest conductor David Robertson introduced himself and the San Francisco Symphony to a less than full house at the Green Music Center on May 23. It was hard to understand why the place wasn't packed. The soloist, Marc-Andre Hamelin, is one of the top pianists in the world, and the program featured Gershwin's ever-popular "Rhapsody in Blue," along with two crowd-pleasers from Ravel: the Concerto for the Left Hand and "La Valse."

Maybe the opening piece, Elliott Carter's "Variations for Orchestra," is what kept them away. Written in 1955, the variations have all the characteristics of Carter's mature style: short, seemingly disconnected phrases; an abundance of dissonance; lack of anything hummable. Fifty years ago, those aspects may have turned off audiences, but these days they sound relatively tame. In truth, the performance on this occasion was lush, fluid and immensely rewarding.

Mr. Robertson clearly likes Carter, and he compared the composer's technique to the train of thought. "It's like the way we think," he said in his introduction: "Ideas jump off." As evidenced by the program notes, musicologists can have a field day picking apart Carter's formal structures, but the real strength of the piece lies with its impression on the listener. If your ears are open, there's a lot to hear. Beginning with short, pithy phrases from throughout the orchestra, the sound congeals into a kind of jagged unanimity, with notes scattered across several octaves at once.

Mr. Robertson kept all these disparate elements well under control, moving fluidly from one section to the next, occasionally using sweeping gestures to propel the Symphony forward. By the last of nine variations a palpable tension had been established, wonderfully resolved in the Allegro molto conclusion, complete with a fanfare from the brass and timpani.

After respectful applause and subsequent stage entry of a piano, Mr. Hamelin appeared with both arms seemingly intact to play Ravel's Concerto for the Left Hand. The pianist alternately rested his right hand on his right knee or anchored it on the bench for particularly vigorous passages. He needed all the anchoring he could get, for his left hand shortly displayed itself as an anatomic marvel of tremendous power and agility. Leaning heavily on the pedal, he generated a phenomenal sound, more than equal to the Symphony's exertions.

Mr. Hamelin swayed gently with eyes closed as he played, seemingly inhabiting the music. On occasion he arched his fingers into a kind of claw and descended upon the keyboard like a diving falcon, ensnaring his prey with pinpoint accuracy. The melodies rang out and the articulation was superb. Though limited to only five digits, he wrapped the entire auditorium in a gossamer veil of sound. Most important, he etched the Ravel concerto, which can often seem muddy, into a surprisingly well-defined, coherent whole. It's not one of the great concertos, but it's close.

After intermission, the 52-year old Canadian artist returned to play "Rhapsody in Blue," which began with a startlingly good clarinet solo and equally great contributions from the trumpets. After the raucous orchestral buildup, Hamelin--using both hands--calmed everyone down with a delicate solo played with the utmost tenderness. As with the Ravel, he so inhabited the music that he gave the impression that he was making it up as he went along. Each phrase led inexorably into the next in a truly bewitching performance.

The effect of Hamelin's and the Symphony's playing was like hearing "Rhapsody in Blue" for the first time. All those United Airlines commercials were purged from the brain, replaced by a work of undeniable power and originality. The Rhapsody may be "in blue," but this performance drew from the entire spectrum.

Playing Ravel's "La Valse" might seem anticlimactic after the glories of Gershwin, but Mr. Robertson and the Symphony invested the performance with the same degree of panache, so the choice ultimately made sense.

"La Valse" begins almost as if under water, with muted sounds coming from all directions. The conductor unveiled them gradually, using supple but expressive motions. As the sound gained in intensity, he provoked sharp outbursts and then settled into a demonic but controlled frenzy. "La Valse," written in the wake of the First World War, is about as ironic as music gets, recasting the imperishably happy waltz motif into a dance of death. Mr. Robertson enacted this role with vigor, transforming himself into an expiring ballet dancer as he hurled his arms to and fro across the podium. The end arrived with a bang, followed by sustained applause.