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Symphony
MENDELSSOHN'S SCOTTISH SAVES THE EVENING IN SRS WEILL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Monday, February 11, 2019
The audience entering Weill Hall for Santa Rosa Symphony concerts Feb. 9-11 were presented with a program that on first glance appeared a curious patchwork Ė a great symphony mixed with a seldom heard concerto and two disparate overtures, and a guest conductor unknown locally. Monday nightís concer...
Recital
INTRIGUING BELL-HAYWOOD RECITAL BEFORE FULL HOUSE IN WEILL HALL
by Abby Wasserman
Friday, February 08, 2019
A big portion of the capacity audience in Weill Hall February 8th came to hear violinist Joshua Bellís virtuosity, and were treated as well to splendid playing from Sam Haywood, Mr. Bellís regular pianist since 2010. The duo performed three engaging sonatas, highlighted by Mr. Bellís sterling techn...
Symphony
TRIPLE PLAY UKIAH SYMPHONY CONCERT AND TCHAIKOVSKY SERENADE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 27, 2019
Over the years the Ukiah Symphonyís concerts have been in the Classical Sonoma Calendar sections, but rarely has this Orchestra, now in its 39th season, had a full winter season concert review. The provocative Jan. 27 program in Mendocino Collegeís Center Theater seemed a good reason to reacquaint ...
Symphony
JACKSON THEATER WELCOMES A NEW RESIDENT ORCHESTRA
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, January 26, 2019
Moving to a permanent new performance venue can be a perilous undertaking for an orchestra, with different acoustics, the loyal audience finding the new spot and infrastructure challenges of lighting and lobby and backstage operations. In their first concert Jan. 26 in Windsorís Jackson Theater the...
Symphony
ECLECTIC PASSIONATE PROGRAMMING AT MARIN SYMPHONY CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, January 26, 2019
The Marin Symphonyís second Masterworks concert of the 2018-19 season featured works by John Adams, Sibelius and Brahms, a masterful assembly. In a spoken introduction before the programís first half, conductor Alasdair Neale primed the audience for the ďterra incognitaĒ of Adamsí The Chairman Dance...
Symphony
A SLICE OF HEAVEN FROM THE SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 13, 2019
Under its vibrant new music director, Francesco Lecce-Chong, the Santa Rosa Symphony this past Sunday offered a nearly perfect afternoon of Mozart (Symphony No. 40) and Mahler (Symphony No. 4). While the two works share a common digit, the only element uniting them is genius. They made for a dazzlin...
Recital
KHOZYAINOV'S BRILLIANT PIANISM IN MILL VALLEY RECITAL
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, January 13, 2019
In its third concert of the season the Mill Valley Chamber Music Society Jan. 13 presented Russian virtuoso Nikolay Khozyainov. His intelligent and sensitive interpretations, masterful pedal work, and virtuoso technique left the near-capacity audience in Mt. Tamalpais Methodist Church astounded and ...
Chamber
A COMPLETE MUSICAL PACKAGE IN ARRON'S OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, January 10, 2019
Cellist Edward Arron has been a welcome artist at the Music at Oakmont series, and after his Jan. 10 recital itís easy to understand his popularity. His artistry is a complete package, with potent instrumental technique wedded to integral musical conceptions. In a nearly flawless concert with pian...
Choral and Vocal
COMPELLING WEILL HALL MESSIAH ORATORIO FROM THE ABS
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, December 15, 2018
Each holiday season when a Classical Sonoma reviewer is assigned to cover a concert with Handelís seminal Oratorio The Messiah, the question arises about what new commentary can possibly apply to the often performed choral work. Well, if itís the American Bach Soloists performing the piece, written...
Opera
PURCELL'S DIDO IN YOUTHFUL SSU OPERA
by Abby Wasserman
Wednesday, December 05, 2018
A doomed royal love affair, the theme of Purcellís Dido and Aeneas, was brought to lovely life at Sonoma State University Dec. 5 in the schoolís Schroeder Hall. Conducted by faculty member Zachary Gordin, who also played continuo, the performance was only the second opera production presented by the...
RECITAL REVIEW
MasterCard Performance Series / Sunday, October 13, 2013
Bryn Terfel, bass-baritone; Natalia Katukova, pianist

Pianist Natalia Katyukova and bass-baritone Bryn Terfel in Weill

TERFEL'S HEROIC SOUND BEGUILES LARGE WEILL HALL AUDIENCE

by Colin Godwin
Sunday, October 13, 2013

Weill Hall hosted a song recital October 13 by bass-baritone Bryn Terfel, with pianist Natalia Katyukova.

The first half consisted of songs based on poems by John Masefield, composed by Ireland, Warlock, Frederick Keel and Quilter. Following intermission, Mr. Terfel sang lieder of Schumann and Schubert, plus songs from the Celtic Isles. I approached this recital with great curiosity, being only familiar with Mr. Terfel's artistry through his role as Woton in Wagner's Ring Cycle.

During his first selection, Irelandís blustering "Sea Fever", Mr. Terfel exhibited his ability to form the song to his expression with subtle changes of tempo and volume while not limiting him to a static stance. He moved easily, shifting his body as he sung, owning more of the stage than just the small space next to the piano. His big, forceful and warm voice dominated the hall, which was less than full with some seating remaining on the main floor in addition to the upper areas.

Mr. Terfel does not have a compact voice. It has breadth and depth with an openness and force that seemed to embrace the hall. In one section of a piece he lifted up to a high note with much less volume, and it seemed weak and I wondered if he was tired. Later on, especially in Schubertís "Litanei," sung very softly, his voice was full and supported. The progression of the songs were varied enough to present a sense of freshness with each.

The singer was a such good actor, using body and facial expressions, that one didn't really have to know the words.

Ms. Katyukova dove into "Sea Fever," adequately balancing and following Mr. Terfelís leads. As the program progressed she became more of a co performer than a supporting pianist, especially in Schumannís "Mein Wagen rollet langsam," which had a long postlude. Ms. Katyukova played with a sensitive touch in all the selections, showing her ability to communicate as a soloist while maintaining a connection with Mr. Terfel. They increasingly showed their enjoyment of each other and in what they were creating.

There was a slight problem with the audience. In their exuberant response to the performers, Mr. Terfel had to encourage applause be held to after the sections consisting of several pieces rather than for each one. Finally the audience was able to comply.

Something that I'd not seen before, in the last verse of Schubertís "Die Forelle," Mr. Terfel sang with a clenched jaw, teeth almost touching. It was very effective in presenting the feelings of anger: "Und ich mit regem Blute". During the Celtic traditional "Loch Lomond" Mr. Terfel stopped and encouraged the audience to sing the recurring stanza. Not being satisfied with the quality of the response, he had the audience stand and sing. The quality and volume of song was much greater.

There were three encores. The first was sung very fast and in a whisper: "Beware, take care, of the green eyed dragon...." The second was "Home On The Range" followed by a comic song "The Gas Man," sung in the style of a pub song. The audience loved it and left the hall smiling.