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Recital
SCHUMANN AND BARTOK HIGHLIGHT BRONFMAN RECITAL IN WEILL
by Lee Ormasa
Friday, April 21, 2017
Those people once addicted to the “Angry Birds” game application likely suffered an auditory flashback during the opening measures of the allegro from Bartok’s Suite, Op. 14, the opening work in Yefim Bronfman’s April 21 recital at Weill Hall. The repetitive opening figures of the Bartok were...
Symphony
HULKING MAHLER "TITAN" AT SO CO PHIL'S SEASON FINALE
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, April 08, 2017
A composer’s first symphony rarely gives a clear indication of what beautiful complexities will follow over the years. Early Mozart and Tchaikovsky are examples, and the big exceptions to this axiom are the “firsts” of Beethoven, Shostakovich and Mahler. Tackling Mahler ‘s D Major Symphony (No. 1,...
Symphony
SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY STAYS CLOSE TO HOME
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, March 26, 2017
Santa Rosa Symphony concerts usually feature high-powered soloists imported from afar, but for their recent “Bring on the Strings” concert set, they stuck close to home, thrusting their principal violin, viola and cello into the limelight. The violinist (Joseph Edelberg) and the violist (Elizabeth P...
Recital
SLAM BANG SONORITY IN HAOCHEN ZHANG'S SCHROEDER RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 19, 2017
Piano Competition winners are in ample supply, and it’s often a hit and miss proposition as to their sterling interpretative qualities. However, the quadrennial Van Cliburn Competition in Ft. Worth has continually produced top-level artists, and the 2009 winner Haochen Zhang proved a formidable per...
Symphony
FOREIGN AFFAIRS CHARACTERS OF THE BAROQUE
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, March 12, 2017
Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin, known as Akamus, played a Weill Hall concert March 12 in a program called "Foreign Affairs -Characters of the Baroque.” The ensemble, that began in 1984, has 15 musicians led by concert master Bernhard Forck. Attired in elegant black with red accents, ranging from tie...
Recital
MUSCULAR PIANISM DOMINATES MILL VALLEY CHAMBER SOCIETY RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 12, 2017
Piano recitals since the beginning of the genre open with finger pieces - Scarlatti or Soler Sonatas, Bach, a Mendelssohn Prelude and Fugue or perhaps Mozart or Haydn. Sarah Daneshpour’s March 12 opening work at the Mill Valley Chamber Music Society series abruptly avoided the norm with the 10-minut...
Recital
NOVEL HAYDN AND SCHUMANN IN YARDEN'S OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, March 09, 2017
Israeli pianist Einav Yarden has been a frequent Sonoma County visitor, playing private recitals for Spring Lake Village and Concerts Grand, and twice performing for Music at Oakmont. The Berlin-based artist returned to Oakmont’s Berger Auditorium March 9 with a program that was neither for connois...
Chamber
CONSUMMATE ENSEMBLE FROM THE MIRÓ IN WEILL
by Sonia Tubridy and Nicki Bell
Sunday, March 05, 2017
A March 5 Weill hall audience of 350 leaned in to share an intimate musical space and to hear the Miró String Quartet’s sterling concert. Starting with Haydn's Op. 20, No. 4, the four musicians seemed to want listeners to be enveloped in their music. The Miró plays with the feat of being four dist...
Recital
BRILLIANT VIOLIN AND PIANO ARTISTRY CHARMS SCHROEDER HALL AUDIENCE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 26, 2017
A tiny Schroeder Hall audience heard a flawless recital Feb. 26 by Yu-Chien Tseng, arguably the best recent local violin recital since Gil Shaham’s transversal of the complete Bach Suites in Weill and Frank Almond’s Oakmont recital in 2015. Muscular playing was the afternoon’s norm, and with pianis...
Chamber
MUSIC AND ART MELD IN ZUCKERMAN TRIO CONCERT
by Nicki Bell
Friday, February 24, 2017
A Feb. 24 Weill Hall concert by the Pinchas Zuckerman Trio juxtaposed formidable music making with palpable associations about visual art. Brahms’ C Minor "Sonatensatz” (Scherzo) is a short youthful work for violin and piano, and was an opening call to action. Lively and vigorous playing alternated...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
MasterCard Performance Series / Tuesday, March 11, 2014
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

BE EMBRACED, YOU MILLIONS

by Steve Osborn
Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Mere prose is inadequate to describe how good the Vienna Philharmonic was at Weill Hall on March 11, but perhaps a waltz title will do the job. How about "Seid umschlungen, Millionen" (Be embraced, you millions)? That was the Johann Strauss encore the orchestra played after their superlative guest conductor, Andris Nelsons, was repeatedly called back to the stage at concert's end.

"Be embraced" was the theme throughout the evening, from the opening bars of Haydn's 90th symphony, through Brahms' "Variations on a Theme by Haydn," into more Brahms--the Symphony No. 3--and culminating in the Strauss waltz, which was actually dedicated to Brahms. Instead of millions, there were only 1,400 patrons in the packed hall, but the millions--billions?--must include all the other patrons who have heard the Vienna Phil over its storied history, a history that continues to be shaped by conductors such as Nelsons and by legions of superb musicians.

The applause started even before the concert began, when a select portion of the Vienna Phil, including a few female violinists and cellists, strode onstage. Old chauvinist traditions die hard, but Vienna is making progress. They had barely settled in when Nelsons walked on as well, clad only in black, without the traditional jacket.

Holding a baton in his right hand, Nelsons grasped the rail at the back of the conductor's podium like a ballerina and then proceeded to mimic a ballerina throughout the evening. Nelsons is a conductor for whom no motion is out of bounds, whether pointing skyward like a celebrant or twirling like a top. His hands and feet are in constant movement, and his baton passes from right to left incessantly. At times, he launches forward into each section of the orchestra, hovering over them like a hawk. He seems to have a different conducting method for every musical passage he encounters.

The first such encounter was the opening Allegro of the Haydn, played impeccably and vivaciously. One often hears Haydn's late "London" symphonies, including the famous "Surprise," but the slightly earlier Parisian counterparts, including No. 90, are just as beguiling. The invention is delightful, the color abundant and the spirit uplifting.

The subsequent Andante settled into a blissful repose marked by a terrific flute solo that found Nelsons conducting with his fingers. For the ensuing Minuet, he stood on his left foot, the better to coax an astounding range of dynamics out of his bewitched subjects. The sprightly Finale wrapped it all up with strong accents, a complete unanimity of sound, and a furious pace leading to ultimate serenity.

More Haydn was in store for the next piece, first literally, and then as fodder for the fertile imagination of Brahms. The "Variations on a Theme by Haydn" was the breakthrough that allowed Brahms to compose his own four symphonies. You can almost hear him discovering his mature style as he mines the rich veins of the first symphonic master.

The opening theme, from Haydn's "Chorale St. Antoni," was stately and well controlled. Nelsons emulated the stately aspect through stricter use of his baton, but by the first variation, he was back to his old tricks, switching the baton from left to right and prancing upon the podium like a man possessed. The eight variations were as different from one another as a polyglot menagerie, ranging from the liquescent (No. 3), to the mysterious (No. 4), to the festive (No. 6). The sound throughout was incredibly rich and impeccably balanced. The brass never overwhelmed the strings, and the woodwinds shone through like sunbeams.

In the second half, given over to the Brahms Symphony No. 3, Nelsons assumed the role of an underwater swimmer, shaping the orchestra's aqueous sound through fluid motions unchallenged by gravity. The pace in the opening Allegro was luxurious, but underlain with a tense expectancy. The players repeatedly turned on a dime, unleashing explosive energy and then floating as if on a cloud.

In the Andante, Nelsons put a finger on his ear as if checking for intonation, but everything seemed perfect. The players once again demonstrated that mastery is not just how loud an orchestra plays, but also how softly. The quiet passages were at the edge of hearing.

The famous cello theme that opens the third movement passed seamlessly around the orchestra, culminating in an evocative horn solo. In the Finale, the subdued opening gave way to a full release of the potential energy that had been gathering all evening. A flurry of down bows from the violins ushered in a thrilling, almost demonic, ride to the muted end, where Nelsons waved his hand in the air in a kind of sad farewell to a magical evening. He was a joy to watch, and his musicians a joy to hear.