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Chamber
VANHAL QUARTET AT VOM FESTIVAL DISCOVERY AT HANNA CENTER
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 15, 2018
A near-capacity crowd of 220 filled the Sonoma Hanna Boys Center Auditorium July 15 for the opening concert of the fourth Valley of the Moon Music Festival. This Festival presents gems of the Classical and early Romantic periods performed on instruments of the composerís era, which presents a few ch...
Opera
SPARKLING CIMAROSA OPERA HIGHLIGHTS MENDOCINO MUSIC FESTIVAL
by Kathryn Stewart
Friday, July 13, 2018
The Classical music era was a time of extraordinary innovation. Dominated by composers from the German-speaking countries, the period witnessed the handiwork of masterpieces by two classical giants, Haydn and Mozart. Both composers put forth a tremendous catalog of masterful works and perhaps to our...
Symphony
!PURA VIDA! A SONIC TRIUMPH FOR SO CO PHIL IN THRILLING COSTA RICA TOUR CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Tuesday, June 19, 2018
Long anticipated events, such as a great sporting game, gourmet feast, holiday trip or a concert, occasionally fall way short of expectations. The results donít measure to expectations. With the Sonoma County Philharmonicís Costa Rica concert June 19, the performance exceeded any heated or tenuou...
Symphony
SO CO PHIL BON VOYAGE CONCERT AN ODYSSEY OF CONTRASTING SOUND
by Terry McNeill
Friday, June 15, 2018
In a splashy bon voyage concert June 15 the Sonoma County Philharmonic Orchestra launched its June 17-25 Costa Rica tour, performing gratis in Santa Rosaís Jackson Theater the repertoire for tour concerts in San Josť, Costa Ricaís capital, and in surrounding towns. Conductor Norman Gamboa pr...
Chamber
COMMANDING CHOPIN AND DEBUSSY IN SLV RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, June 06, 2018
Concerts at the classy Spring Lake Village Retirement Home in Santa Rosa have admission limited to residents and a few guests, but the chance to hear a first cabin North Bay pianist June 6 brought a Classical Sonoma reviewer into the audience of 100. The crowd numbers were unusually low due to a ba...
Recital
MUSICAL ALCHEMY INSIDE A HIDDEN GEM
by Kayleen Asbo
Friday, May 25, 2018
The Petaluma Historical Library and Museum is a hidden gem of Sonoma County, a gracious†building†that is one of Sonoma Countyís loveliest venues for chamber music concerts, with a fine period piano particularly suited to Romantic music.† Of the surprisingly large array of festivities there, one of t...
Chamber
FINAL VOM MUSICIANS CONCERT IN SCHROEDER A SCHUBERT DELIGHT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, May 12, 2018
It's rare to have the opportunity to compare in a short period two performances of the same major Schubert work, in this case the great B Flat Piano Trio, D. 898. The chance came May 12 when the Valley of the Moon Festival musicians played it in Schroeder, just over a month since the Hallís residen...
Symphony
FERRANDIS BIDS ADIEU WITH MAHLERíS FINAL SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 06, 2018
Sonoma State students in graduation robes posed for pictures and hugged each other at the universityís stone gates on Sunday afternoon, mirroring the prolonged farewells within the universityís Green Music Center, where Bruno Ferrandis bid adieu to the Santa Rosa Symphony after a dozen years at the ...
Symphony
SONIC SPLENDOR AT MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Abby Wasserman
Tuesday, May 01, 2018
The Marin Symphony Orchestra ended the current season with a flourish, interpreting big and small works by Richard Strauss and Stravinsky. Strauss and Stravinsky were contemporaries for 40 years, but inhabited different worlds. Both composers were affected by cataclysmic changes and war, and musical...
Symphony
ORGAN SYMPHONY IN SSU ORCHESTRA CONCERT IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 29, 2018
Though Classical Sonoma seldom reviews student concerts, as ample North Coast concerts keep the staff of 11 reviewers busy. But the chance to hear the Sonoma State University Orchestra tackle St. SaŽnsí majestic Organ Symphony April 29 was a rare opportunity and not easily to be missed. Avec lí...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Santa Rosa Symphony / Saturday, May 03, 2014
Bruno Ferrandis, conductor. Jon Kimura Parker, piano

Pianist Jon Kimura Parker

OUT OF MANY, ONE

by Steve Osborn
Saturday, May 03, 2014

The title of the Santa Rosa Symphony's May 3 concert at Weill Hall was "Spring Rhapsody," and the music contained therein was indeed rhapsodic, ranging from the youthful exuberance of Debussy, to the sparkling wit of Rachmaninoff, to the pagan energy of Stravinsky. But the real rhapsody was the Symphony's ability, along with conductor Bruno Ferrandis and piano soloist Jon Kimura Parker, to bring each of those pieces to vibrant life. The playing was inspired from beginning to end, with no glitches to break the spell.

Piano soloist Parker was the embodiment of inspired playing. Preparing to perform Rachmaninoff's "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini," he assumed a rock-solid posture on the piano bench, his feet firmly planted, his eyes glued to the keys, his hands poised for action. He rarely deviated from that pose throughout the performance, concentrating all his energy into his hands.

Those hands proved capable of almost anything, whether bouncing off the keys or exercising the utmost delicacy of touch. His attack was so prodigious that he never had trouble making himself heard. Every note was distinct, every phrase complete.

The Rhapsody consists of 24 variations on a familiar theme by Paganini. They range from classical variations on melodic elements to more distant versions that are only tangentially related to the theme. Parker accentuated the differences between the variations, making each one distinct while continuing to drive the piece forward. By the time he arrived at the famous 18th variation, he was in overdrive, building up the lush romantic theme from pianissimo to triple forte in a thrilling display of power.

Ferrandis and the Symphony matched Parker bar for bar, offering a perfect balance to his solo flights. When the Rhapsody was over, Parker flung his arms out to the sides and rushed up to the podium to embrace Ferrandis. The two had clearly connected, and the Symphony players responded warmly, along with the audience, which rose to its feet for a sustained ovation.

Earlier, the Symphony opened the concert with a strong reading of Debussy's "Printemps," a youthful work firmly rooted in Impressionism. The two-movement piece contains many of the composer's characteristic elements, including luscious melodies, atmospheric writing and graceful fluidity. Ferrandis brought all these out, at times resorting to agitated hand gestures to produce adequate vibrato from the strings.

The first movement featured a wonderful viola solo by Meg Titchener, and the second concluded with an unexpected sprightly dance theme, which emerged from the dense tapestry of sound like a ray of sunlight. It was a captivating ending to a rarely performed youthful gem.

The real gem of the evening, however, came after intermission: Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring." This landmark piece, now 101 years old, fundamentally altered music, and it remains as thrilling as ever. Rarely has anyone employed the full orchestra to such telling effect. Each type of instrument, from the piccolo to the string bass, has its own distinct line, and the unending variety of their combinations fully engages the senses.

The first thing you notice about the Rite is the immensity of the orchestra. The woodwind, brass and percussion sections are doubled or tripled in size, so much so that they rival the number of string players. With this rebalancing, everyone gains equal importance, and the old notion of an orchestra being dominated by the first violins is thrown to the wind.

Ferrandis took a well-controlled approach to the Rite, stressing rhythmic exactitude above all else. The piece is notorious for its many syncopations and other rhythmic challenges, but Ferrandis was unfazed, beating the constantly changing time signatures with a steady hand and an unvarying internal metronome. His tempi were by turns brisk and restrained.

The playing throughout was exemplary, from Carla Wilson's haunting bassoon solo at the opening to the no-holds-barred full orchestra at the end. While the Rite is known for its boisterous passages and its propulsive rhythms, there are as many slow sections as fast ones. These calms between the storms featured some of the most expressive playing of the evening.

For sheer excitement, however, nothing could match the storms. The orchestra was particularly malleable when playing these, shifting in and out of them with dramatic flair. Perhaps the most vivid image of the evening was of one percussionist virtually hurling himself into the bass drum, which shook from the force of his blow.

The performance was an object lesson in what orchestras are all about: out of many, one. Each instrument had a distinct voice, and their interactions led to a unified whole. During the sustained ovation at the end, Ferrandis asked more than a dozen soloists and sections to stand before bidding the entire orchestra to rise.

Afterward, as the audience made its way out, one woman remarked to her companion, "How does somebody put all the notes together for something like that?" That's a difficult question to answer, but the results are nonetheless spectacular, as the Symphony made abundantly clear.