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Recital
DEDIK'S POTENT BEETHOVEN AND CHOPIN AT SPRING LAKE VILLAGE RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Monday, September 17, 2018
Anastasia Dedik returned Sept. 17 to the Spring Lake Village Classical Music Series in a recital that featured three familiar virtuoso works in potent interpretations. Chopin’s G Minor Ballade hasn’t been heard in Sonoma County public concerts since a long-ago Earl Wild performance, and Beethoven’s...
Recital
DUO WEST OPENS OCCIDENTAL CONCERT SEASON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, September 09, 2018
Before a full house at the Occidental Performing Arts Center Sept. 9 the cello-piano Duo West, playing from score throughout, presented a recital that on paper looked stimulating and thoughtful. Beginning with MacDowell’s To A Wild Rose (from Woodland Sketches, Op. 51), the transcription by an unan...
Chamber
CELLO-PIANO DUO IN HUSKY SPRING LAKE VILLAGE PROGRAM
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, September 05, 2018
Two thirds of the way through a stimulating 22-concert season the Spring Lake Village Classical Music Series Sept. 5 presented two splendid cello sonatas before 110 people in the Village’s Montgomery auditorium. A duo for more than a decade, East Bay musicians cellist Monica Scott and pianist Hadle...
Chamber
EXTRAVAGANT FUSION OF STYLES AT CHRIS BOTTI BAND WEILL HALL CONCERT
by Jerry Dibble
Sunday, August 12, 2018
Trumpeter Chris Botti still performs in jazz venues including SF Jazz and The Blue Note, but now appears mostly in cavernous halls or on outdoor stages like the Sonoma State University’s Green Music Center. He brought his unique road show to the packed Weill Hall August 12 in a concert of effusive e...
Chamber
SCHUBERT "MIT SCHLAG" AT VOM FESTIVAL MORNING CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 29, 2018
The spirit of 19th century Vienna was present July 29 on the final day of the Valley of the Moon Music Festival. The Festival in the second half of July glittered with innovative programming and the new, old sound of original instruments played by musicians who love music with historic instruments. ...
Chamber
PASSIONATE BRAHMS-SCHOENBERG MUSIC CLOSES VOM FESTIVAL SUMMER
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 29, 2018
An extraordinary program of chamber music by Brahms and Schoenberg attracted a capacity crowd to the Valley of the Moon Music Festival’s final concert July 29th in Sonoma’s Hanna Center. It opened with a richly expressive reading by Festival Laureate violinist Rachell Wong and pianist Jeffrey LaDeur...
Chamber
PRAGUE AND VIENNA PALACE GEMS HIGHLIGHT VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 28, 2018
The remarkable Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival presented a concert called “Kinsky Palace” July 28 on their final Festival weekend in Sonoma’s Hanna Center. Two well-known treasures and one lesser gem were programmed. Starting the afternoon offerings were violinist Monica Huggett and Fest...
Chamber
INNOVATIVE CHAMBER WORKS IN HANNA CENTER CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, July 22, 2018
The Valley of the Moon Music Festival presented a July 22 concert featuring three giants: Haydn, Schubert and Schumann, composers who altered music of their time with creative innovations and artistic vision. In the fourth season the Festival’s theme this year is “Vienna in Transition”, and VOM Fes...
Chamber
VIENNA INSPIRATION FOR VOM FESTIVAL PROGRAM AT HANNA CENTER
by Nicki Bell
Saturday, July 21, 2018
A music-loving audience filled Sonoma’s Hanna Center Auditorium July 21 to begin a record weekend of three concerts, produced by the Valley of the Moon Music Festival. The Festival’s theme this summer is “Venice in Transition – From the Enlightenment to the Dawn of Modernism” Prior to Saturday’s m...
Chamber
VANHAL QUARTET AT VOM FESTIVAL DISCOVERY AT HANNA CENTER
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 15, 2018
A near-capacity crowd of 220 filled the Sonoma Hanna Boys Center Auditorium July 15 for the opening concert of the fourth Valley of the Moon Music Festival. This Festival presents gems of the Classical and early Romantic periods performed on instruments of the composer’s era, which presents a few ch...
RECITAL REVIEW
MasterCard Perofrmance Series / Sunday, May 18, 2014
Richard Goode, piano

Marcia Weinfeld and Richard Goode in Weill Hall May 18

ELEGANCE AND INTROSPECTION

by Nicki Bell
Sunday, May 18, 2014

A May 18 Weill Hall audience was led by the hands and heart of Richard Goode to a quiet realm of the sublime with a performance of the masterful last three Beethoven Piano Sonatas.

The program was billed as the first time the artist has toured with the Op. 109, 110 and 111 pieces, and these weighty works were leavened somewhat by lighter Beethoven, the eleven short Op. 119 Bagatelles, that opened the second half. Mr. Goode's playing has always avoided the colossal and histrionic in Beethoven, concentrating the musical experience in contrasts that underscore both power and delicacy. It’s an admirable approach removed from a French or Slavic style in Beethoven.

Beginning with the E Major Sonata, Op. 109, the pianist immediately established a strong rhythmic pulse which later carried over into the A Flat and C Minor Sonatas. The second movement of Op. 109 was played aggressively with a lengthy theme and six variations and a clearly-articulated fugue. The trills were technically secure and the reading built to the serene return of the lovely theme.

Opus 110 was similarly dramatic, even more so with insistent lyricism and the pianist deftly portraying the Arioso’s inward despair. The concluding fugue had subtle voice leadings that built gradually to a full and commanding ending.

Concluding the recital was a stormy performance of the Op. 111 work, especially potent in the “Maestos – Allegro con brio ed appassionato” movement. Here the artist scaled technical and interpretative heights with impressive speed and endurance. The monumental and ecstatic Arietta theme was a deeply moving experience and Mr. Goode maintained the basic tempo throughout the variations, including the fourth variation which is frequently played too fast. The performance of this autumnal work had a shimmering depth of emotion and sensitivity palpable to the audience sprinkled with pianists. Surprisingly there was not the usual Op. 111 "held breath" hush, and Mr. Goode appeared disconcerted at the all-too-soon ovation. There was no encore.

The 70-year old pianist played entirely from score, a somewhat rare occurrence given Mr. Goode’s eminence, and the artist selected Weill’s newest concert instrument that proved to have an overly bright treble.

Dean Morse and Sonia Tubridy contributed to this review