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Recital
STYLUS AND PLAYING FANTASTICUS IN YOUNG'S ORGAN RECITAL
by Paul Blanchard
Sunday, June 25, 2017
Organist Robert Young gave a wonderful tour through the stylus fantasticus (fantastic style) organ literature June 25 playing a recital on the Casavant organ at Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa. Mr. Young recently became the organist at the Church and previously served for 20 years as Music D...
Chamber
KODALY DUO TRUMPS POPULAR MENDELSSOHN TRIO AT SLV CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, June 21, 2017
It’s not really a secret, but Sonoma County’s best chamber music series is one without much notoriety or publicity. The concerts at Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village programs are only for residents and a few invited guests. Impresario Robert Hayden years ago honed his producer skills as founder of ...
Recital
DEMANDING VIOLIN SONATAS CONQUERED BY BEILMAN-WEISS DUO IN SCHROEDER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 14, 2017
Violinist Benjamin Beilman’s ravishing Mozart performance at last summer’s Weill Hall ChamberFest finale lured an enthusiastic crowd to Schroeder Hall May 14 to hear if his secure virtuosity was up to a program of demanding sonatas. He did not disappoint. With the powerful pianist Orion Weiss in t...
Symphony
SOVIETS INVADE WEILL HALL, TAKE NO PRISONERS
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 07, 2017
Bruno Ferrandis may be French, but he excels in Soviet repertoire. His Slavonic expertise was more than amply demonstrated at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s May 7 concert, where the program began joyfully with Khachaturian’s ballet suite from “Masquerade,” surged forward with Prokofiev’s second violin co...
Recital
MASTERFUL PIANISM IN GOODE'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, May 05, 2017
Pianist Richard Goode programmed an evening of treasures May 5 from four great composers, and is an artist of intimacy and intelligence, power and passion, able to go deep and to soar. Hearing Mr. Goode play this literature was a reminder of how music does indeed bridge worlds and time. Bach’s E m...
Recital
ELEGANT ORGAN SALUTE TO THE REFORMATION
by Paul Blanchard
Sunday, April 30, 2017
Organist Jonathan Dimmock presented an April 30 recital in homage to the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, playing Schroeder Hall’s wonderful Brombaugh instrument. Mr. Dimmock is the organist for the San Francisco Symphony, principal organist for the Palace of the Legion of Honor and teaches at...
Chamber
NOTES AND BARS DO NOT A PRISON MAKE
by Nicki Bell
Saturday, April 29, 2017
The Hermitage Piano Trio brought exuberant musicality and sumptuous sound to a packed house April 29 in Occidental's Performing Arts Center for the last concert in the Redwood Arts Council’s 37th season. With a wide interpretive range--from lush to delicate to passionate--these three young Russian v...
Recital
SCHUMANN AND BARTOK HIGHLIGHT BRONFMAN RECITAL IN WEILL
by Lee Ormasa
Friday, April 21, 2017
Those people once addicted to the “Angry Birds” game application likely suffered an auditory flashback during the opening measures of the allegro from Bartok’s Suite, Op. 14, the opening work in Yefim Bronfman’s April 21 recital at Weill Hall. The repetitive opening figures of the Bartok were...
Symphony
HULKING MAHLER "TITAN" AT SO CO PHIL'S SEASON FINALE
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, April 08, 2017
A composer’s first symphony rarely gives a clear indication of what beautiful complexities will follow over the years. Early Mozart and Tchaikovsky are examples, and the big exceptions to this axiom are the “firsts” of Beethoven, Shostakovich and Mahler. Tackling Mahler ‘s D Major Symphony (No. 1,...
Symphony
SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY STAYS CLOSE TO HOME
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, March 26, 2017
Santa Rosa Symphony concerts usually feature high-powered soloists imported from afar, but for their recent “Bring on the Strings” concert set, they stuck close to home, thrusting their principal violin, viola and cello into the limelight. The violinist (Joseph Edelberg) and the violist (Elizabeth P...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Sonoma State University Department of Music / Sunday, August 24, 2014
Eugenia Wie and Joseph Edelberg, violin; Judyaba, cello; Kathleen Reynolds, flute; Eric Caballo, guitar; Marilyn Thompson, piano

Violinist Eugenia Wie

FACULTY AND COMMUNITY MUSICIANS JOIN IN SCHROEDER CELEBRATION

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, August 24, 2014

Though many of the inaugural Schroeder Hall concerts had larger audiences than the Aug. 24 faculty and community musician event, few of them had such lovely music on display.

Some of the best were first, with ravishing music from SSU guitarist Eric Cabalo and Santa Rosa Symphony violinist Eugenie Wie. This fetching duo played Piazzolla’s “Historie du Tango” with bandoneon concertina effects and rich sonority. Ms. Wie played with minimal vibrato, and Mr. Cabalo exhibited subtle control of pianissimo and elegant phrasing. Stefane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt could not have played Piazzolla’s delicious piece with more charm.

Joining Mr. Cabalo in his own “Event Horizon” were his guitar students Kenny Campbell, Brandyn Klinect and Cody Martin. The composer described the work as having an astrophysical character with Lydian key instability. The work was never dissonant, and it had a repetitive and minimalist design and some snappy hand slaps on the guitar body. It was a novel and accomplished piece for guitar quartet, astutely played.

Brahms’ opening Allergo Moderato from the C Minor Piano Trio, Op. 87, was played by SSU faculty pianist Marilyn Thompson and cellist Judiyaba, along with Santa Rosa Symphony violinist Joseph Edelberg. It was a brawny reading, emphasizing the two string parts' alternating vigorous chords with the piano. I wanted to hear the concluding two movements of a composition best heard on a cold winter’s evening.

Two short guitar works with new performers Henry Alonzo and Patricia Castaneda came before a beguiling Jean-Michel Damase concert sonata for flute, cello and piano. Symphony flutist Kathleen Lane Reynolds played the work with an easy virtuosity, carrying the thematic weight away from Ms. Judiyaba and Ms. Thompson.

This happy concert sonata from 1952 has strains of the palm court and the café, the many sprightly sections demanding a deft touch from each performer. Ms. Judiyaba was perhaps too differential playing the bass line, but Ms. Thompson was as always a sure-footed and consummate pianist. The rapid movement toward the end of the sonata spotlighted Ms. Reynolds’ masterful command of tonal colors and animated rhythms. Her flute playing in symphonic or chamber music is always vivacious and prismatic.

Though not a full house, the Schroeder audience gave loud applause to these shapely and accomplished performances.