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Chamber
BEETHOVEN FEATURED IN SF TRIO'S OCCIDENTAL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 19, 2020
Conventional repertoire in uncommonly good performances highlighted the San Francisco Piano Trio’s Jan. 19 concert in the Occidental Center for the Arts. Haydn’s No. 44 Trio (Hob. XV:28) came from late in his long career, when he was in and out of London, and received a sparkling reading that featu...
SIMONE PORTER ASPIRES TO STARDOM WITH SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 12, 2020
The Sibelius violin concerto is one of several mountains that violin soloists need to ascend before they can lay claim to stardom. Hundreds make the attempt every year, but only a few reach the top. Simone Porter, who played the concerto with the Santa Rosa Symphony on Sunday afternoon, got close bu...
Choral and Vocal
ORPHEUS OF AMSTERDAM'S MUSIC IN SCHROEDER ORGAN CHORAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, January 10, 2020
“All over the map.” Sonoma Bach, directed by Bob Worth, has taken its audiences this season on journeys through many centuries and many lands. The programming is fresh and intriguing and the performers varied and creators of beauty and interest. The January 10 program was centered on organ works by...
Choral and Vocal
OLD NORTH GERMAN CAROLS IN SONOMA BACH'S SCHROEDER CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, December 15, 2019
“Cast off all sorrows…also dance in heavenly fashion.” A volume called Piae Cantiones was printed in 1582 in North Germany, lively songs going back to the 14th century, and this treasure trove provided material for numerous composers to arrange Christmas carols over following generations, from simp...
Symphony
EVERLASTING LIGHT AT SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Monday, December 09, 2019
The Mozart Requiem includes four intermittent vocal soloists, but the real star is the choir, which is featured in almost every movement. That stardom shone bright at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s memorable Requiem performance on Monday night. The soloists were good, but the choir was superb. Located wi...
Symphony
UNFINISHED AND FINNISH
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 08, 2019
Having a new resident conductor on the podium for the Ukiah Symphony was an attractive invitation for a long-delayed visit to Mendocino College’s Center Theater Dec. 8. The insouciant Les Pfutzenreuter recently retired after decades of conducting the ensemble, replaced by Phillip Lenberg who also j...
Choral and Vocal
PRAERTORIUS IN RENAISSANCE GLORY FROM SONOMA BACH
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Sonoma Bach Choir, in collaboration with Barefoot All-Stars Viol Consort and The Whole Noyse Brass Ensemble, presented “Sing Glorious Praetorius!” November 16 to an almost full Schroeder Hall at the Green Music Center. The Soloists were soprano Dianna Morgan, Christopher Fritzsche, (countertenor), m...
Symphony
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL EXCITEMENT IN SO CO PHIL CONCERT IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Beginning with a scintillating reading of Rossini’s Overture to the Opera “Semiramide,” the Sonoma County Philharmonic performed a splendid program Nov. 16 in the Jackson Theater, and featured two additional works, one showcasing the winner of the San Francisco Conservatory’s Young Artist Award. It...
Chamber
SPIRITUAL LATE BEETHOVEN QUARTET HIGHLIGHTS MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 10, 2019
Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op. 131, called “unparalleled in its inexhaustibility” by critic Thomas May, is a daunting challenge. Orchestral in concept, filled with wit and charm, melancholy and fury, it almost overwhelms listeners. Playing the frenetic Scherzo, a viol...
Symphony
MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANCE IN UNIQUE SRS CONCERT IN WEILL HALL
by Terry McNeill
Monday, November 04, 2019
It was a concert full of surprises Nov. 4 as the Santa Rosa Symphony responded to the area’s wild fires and evacuations with challenging, songful and somewhat unique music in Weill Hall. The last of a three-concert series titled "Master of the Modern Banjo" is reviewed here. The evening began with...
OPERA REVIEW
Cinnabar Theater / Saturday, June 13, 2015
Mary Chun, conductor. For cast see June 12 entry

Jo Vincent Parks as Sir John Falstaff June 12 (E. Chazankin Photo)

SIR JOHN'S VISUAL FEAST IN CINNABAR THEATER FALSTAFF PRODUCTION

by Terry McNeill
Saturday, June 13, 2015

Verdi’s operas tend to have a visceral impact on listeners, the connection forged by emphasizing starkly realistic human emotions and glorious tunes for singers and richly hued orchestra writing. But not in his last opera written in 1893: Falstaff.

In only the Italian master's second comedy, Falstaff can seem at well over two hours drawn out and lacking the catchy melodies of the operas Rigoletto, Aida or Ernani. Petaluma’s Cinnabar Theater production began June 12, running for nine performances to June 28, and on opening night overcame the familiar with a brilliantly conceived production that featured theatrical rather than musical splendor. It was a different kind of Falstaff.

The cast was strong, led by Jo Vincent Parks as the insouciant Sir John, Eileen Morris’s Alice Ford, veteran Cinnabar artist William Neely as Alice’s husband, Krista Wigle as Mrs. Quickly, and Scott Joiner and Aurélie Veruni as the young lovers Fenton and Nannetta. And the production was large, combining 23 singing roles with a 12-piece orchestra conducted by Cinnabar Music Director Mary Chun.

Sonic balances through the three acts in the small hall were mostly good, the orchestra occasionally covering the singers, but never Mr. Parks stentorian baritone, Ms. Morris’ soprano or Mr. Neely’s paced and agile baritone. In many ways the women’s roles upstaged those of the men, and Ms. Wigle and Kim Anderman (Meg) added as much comedy as Mr. Parks with his pratfalls and pomposity, and his groupies Bardolf and Pistol (Ted Zoldan and Sepp Hammer). Throughout the opera Falstaff is pummeled, derided, thrown into a huge laundry basket, and finally unceremoniously tossed into the river after being constantly tricked by four savvy women that know the territory far better than he does. But in Mr. Park’s interpretation he survives physical and emotional upsets to achieve a small triumph, where at the end he declaims the world is folly and people are simply figures of mirth.

In this unique production, the first Falstaff on the North Coast in many years, there is a novel development. Stage Director Elly Lichenstein has fashioned a glittering visual drama, full of busy choreography and vaudeville touches, but as the acts unfold the opera’s core impact moved from the audio to the visual. The subtlety of Verdi’s urbane music faded into to the background of farcical revelry and evocative stage sets. The secretive sliding windows in the back wall location allowed pungent vocal “asides” to be rapidly delivered and kept interest centered on the dramaturgy and Sir John's foolish amorous ambitions.

This is not to say the beguiling score was not well presented, as Ms. Chun deftly controlled the string sound and contrasting colors from percussion, winds and even chimes (12 of them) when Falstaff in costume is moving to an anticipated assignation with Alice Ford. First violinist Claire-Jeanne Martin played graceful solos, string tremolos and horn calls highlighted the drama, and Steven Hoffmann (bass viol) and keyboardist Michael Anthony Schuler provided sonorous continuo support.

Costumes in this production, designed by Lisa Eldredge, were exemplary and especially extravagant in Scene Two of the Third Act and worn throughout by Mr. Parks and Ms. Wigle. They were delightfully outrageous costumes, in the Cinnabar tradition, as the production set in the 1950s featured bright orange, pink and blue tints on dresses, pants and even shoes.

Eileen Morris in the role of Alice was an organizing force in the group conspiring to bring Sir John Falstaff to his comeuppance, and she captured the bit of devil in the role. The part of Meg is not so prominent, though Ms. Anderman aided Ms. Wigle in moving the uninhibited slapstick forward. It was a performance without extended arias, save for Mr. Neely's Act 2, Scene 1 solo, Mr. Joiner’s lyrical singing that began Act 3, and Ms.
Veruni's fetching "Queen of the Fairies" aria in Act 3.

Cinnabar has a sparkling history of adding new twists to conventional opera plots, always in English, and connecting trenchantly with the audience. This Falstaff production meets a high professional standard and the packed opening-night audience applauded with gusto.