Home  Reviews  Articles  Calendar  Presenters  Add Event     
Recital
DEDIK'S POTENT BEETHOVEN AND CHOPIN AT SPRING LAKE VILLAGE RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Monday, September 17, 2018
Anastasia Dedik returned Sept. 17 to the Spring Lake Village Classical Music Series in a recital that featured three familiar virtuoso works in potent interpretations. Chopin’s G Minor Ballade hasn’t been heard in Sonoma County public concerts since a long-ago Earl Wild performance, and Beethoven’s...
Recital
DUO WEST OPENS OCCIDENTAL CONCERT SEASON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, September 09, 2018
Before a full house at the Occidental Performing Arts Center Sept. 9 the cello-piano Duo West, playing from score throughout, presented a recital that on paper looked stimulating and thoughtful. Beginning with MacDowell’s To A Wild Rose (from Woodland Sketches, Op. 51), the transcription by an unan...
Chamber
CELLO-PIANO DUO IN HUSKY SPRING LAKE VILLAGE PROGRAM
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, September 05, 2018
Two thirds of the way through a stimulating 22-concert season the Spring Lake Village Classical Music Series Sept. 5 presented two splendid cello sonatas before 110 people in the Village’s Montgomery auditorium. A duo for more than a decade, East Bay musicians cellist Monica Scott and pianist Hadle...
Chamber
EXTRAVAGANT FUSION OF STYLES AT CHRIS BOTTI BAND WEILL HALL CONCERT
by Jerry Dibble
Sunday, August 12, 2018
Trumpeter Chris Botti still performs in jazz venues including SF Jazz and The Blue Note, but now appears mostly in cavernous halls or on outdoor stages like the Sonoma State University’s Green Music Center. He brought his unique road show to the packed Weill Hall August 12 in a concert of effusive e...
Chamber
SCHUBERT "MIT SCHLAG" AT VOM FESTIVAL MORNING CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 29, 2018
The spirit of 19th century Vienna was present July 29 on the final day of the Valley of the Moon Music Festival. The Festival in the second half of July glittered with innovative programming and the new, old sound of original instruments played by musicians who love music with historic instruments. ...
Chamber
PASSIONATE BRAHMS-SCHOENBERG MUSIC CLOSES VOM FESTIVAL SUMMER
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 29, 2018
An extraordinary program of chamber music by Brahms and Schoenberg attracted a capacity crowd to the Valley of the Moon Music Festival’s final concert July 29th in Sonoma’s Hanna Center. It opened with a richly expressive reading by Festival Laureate violinist Rachell Wong and pianist Jeffrey LaDeur...
Chamber
PRAGUE AND VIENNA PALACE GEMS HIGHLIGHT VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 28, 2018
The remarkable Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival presented a concert called “Kinsky Palace” July 28 on their final Festival weekend in Sonoma’s Hanna Center. Two well-known treasures and one lesser gem were programmed. Starting the afternoon offerings were violinist Monica Huggett and Fest...
Chamber
INNOVATIVE CHAMBER WORKS IN HANNA CENTER CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, July 22, 2018
The Valley of the Moon Music Festival presented a July 22 concert featuring three giants: Haydn, Schubert and Schumann, composers who altered music of their time with creative innovations and artistic vision. In the fourth season the Festival’s theme this year is “Vienna in Transition”, and VOM Fes...
Chamber
VIENNA INSPIRATION FOR VOM FESTIVAL PROGRAM AT HANNA CENTER
by Nicki Bell
Saturday, July 21, 2018
A music-loving audience filled Sonoma’s Hanna Center Auditorium July 21 to begin a record weekend of three concerts, produced by the Valley of the Moon Music Festival. The Festival’s theme this summer is “Venice in Transition – From the Enlightenment to the Dawn of Modernism” Prior to Saturday’s m...
Chamber
VANHAL QUARTET AT VOM FESTIVAL DISCOVERY AT HANNA CENTER
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 15, 2018
A near-capacity crowd of 220 filled the Sonoma Hanna Boys Center Auditorium July 15 for the opening concert of the fourth Valley of the Moon Music Festival. This Festival presents gems of the Classical and early Romantic periods performed on instruments of the composer’s era, which presents a few ch...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Valley of the Moon Music Festival / Sunday, July 17, 2016
Kyle Stegall, tenor
Elizabeth Blumenstock, violin
Tanya Tomkins, cello
Eric Zivian, fortepiano

Eric Vivian and Tanya Tomkins Play Beethoven July 17 (John Hefti Photo)

PERIOD INSTRUMENT SOUND AT VOM FESTIVAL'S OPENING CONCERT AT HANNA CENTER

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, July 17, 2016

Every summer music festival has a unique character, and the Valley of the Moon Music Festival in Sonoma has the singular character of stressing period instruments that sound well for mostly period repertoire.

In the Festival’s opening concert July 17 this was best in evidence for two Beethoven works, the “Kakadu” Piano Trio and the seven cello variations based on a theme from Mozart’s opera “The Magic Flute.” Eric Zivian, Northern California’s premier fortepianist, brought two of his instruments (period copies) to the Hanna Boys Center auditorium and convinced even skeptical listeners of the fortepiano’s center stage role.

He began with a movement of Clementi’s B Flat Sonata, Op. 24, No. 2, with fluid scale playing and balance in the registers. Key dip in a c. 1795 instrument is less than a modern piano, allowing for rapid rippling scales, clipped phrasing and assured ornamentation. The cadenza was short.

Mr. Zivian, heard in every work on the program, then joined tenor Kyle Stegall in a brief aria from Mozart’s Opera “Magic Flute.” Titled Die Bildnis ist Bezaubernd, the music brought out Mr. Stegall’s rich sonority, excellent German diction and his skill at swelling delicately on soft notes. It was charm with strength.

Gut strings are a required item for most Festival music at Hanna, and the Mozart Major Sonata for Violin, K. 526, was played with these strings by Elizabeth Blumenstock, again with Mr. Zivian at the piano. In the Molto Allegro the violinist’s tone was thin and often covered by the piano, with ends of phrases fading away and little rhythmic flexibility. It went this way through the Sonata, though in the Andante the duo played lovely balanced pianissimo phrases.

This reviewer has heard the violinist many times before, mostly with the renowned American Bach Soloists, and in music with less required vibrato and projection the result has been impressive. This afternoon, even during the Presto finale, the violin articulation didn’t save a timid sound. This reaction may simply be too deep an association with classical recordings of the A Major with more powerful steel strings, from Grumiaux/Haskill and Schumsky/Balsam.

After intermission Festival founder and cellist Tanya Tomkins joined Mr. Zivian for the buoyant Variations on Bei Männern, welche Liebe Fühlen.” Here Ms. Tomkins' instrument also had gut strings but had a strong bottom end sound and that was agile but different from a differently strung cello. The phrasing throughout was deft and Mr. Zivian, in a long introduction to the fourth Variation, inserted brief tasty ritards, meshing well with Ms. Tomkins’ slow vibrato at the end of phrases. Mozart’s catchy tune with this duo became a cheerful delight.

Mr. Stegall returned to sing three Mozart Lieder. The short (45 seconds) Wie unglücklich bin nit (K. 125g) found him almost in a baritone range, and the Lied der Freiheit (K. 506) was bouncy and animated, with crystal clear diction. Song three was certainly the highlight, and the warm Abendempfindung (K. 523) had a questioning plea over soft arpeggios from Mr. Zivian, and ascending and descending soft scales from Mr. Stegall. It was the longest song and caught a plaintive and sad character. Applause was heavy.

Ending the concert was the G Minor Beethoven Trio, Op. 121a, with Mr. Zivian using a Mendelssohn-era piano. Following a long somber introduction the music is light hearted, and the trio played it that way. Ms. Blumenstock at times used a Spiccato bow in variations with clipped phrases and each variation seemed to ease naturally into then next one.

Thematic projection qualities from the violin and cello fit the 1824 work perfectly, though the top notes in the piano had a peculiar electric piano tone quality without partials. The composer’s phenomenal command of the variation form was everywhere in evidence, and the Accelerando to the end brought the concert to a vivid close.

There was no encore and refreshments were served on the auditorium’s breezy and sunny deck, a happy VOM tradition set to carry through the additional seven concerts of the second year of the Festival.