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!PURA VIDA! A SONIC TRIUMPH FOR SO CO PHIL IN THRILLING COSTA RICA TOUR CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Tuesday, June 19, 2018
Long anticipated events, such as a great sporting game, gourmet feast, holiday trip or a concert, occasionally fall way short of expectations. The results donít measure to expectations. With the Sonoma County Philharmonicís Costa Rica concert June 19, the performance exceeded any heated or tenuou...
Symphony
SO CO PHIL BON VOYAGE CONCERT AN ODYSSEY OF CONTRASTING SOUND
by Terry McNeill
Friday, June 15, 2018
In a splashy bon voyage concert June 15 the Sonoma County Philharmonic Orchestra launched its June 17-25 Costa Rica tour, performing gratis in Santa Rosaís Jackson Theater the repertoire for tour concerts in San Josť, Costa Ricaís capital, and in surrounding towns. Conductor Norman Gamboa pr...
Symphony
FERRANDIS BIDS ADIEU WITH MAHLERíS FINAL SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 06, 2018
Sonoma State students in graduation robes posed for pictures and hugged each other at the universityís stone gates on Sunday afternoon, mirroring the prolonged farewells within the universityís Green Music Center, where Bruno Ferrandis bid adieu to the Santa Rosa Symphony after a dozen years at the ...
Symphony
SONIC SPLENDOR AT MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Abby Wasserman
Tuesday, May 01, 2018
The Marin Symphony Orchestra ended the current season with a flourish, interpreting big and small works by Richard Strauss and Stravinsky. Strauss and Stravinsky were contemporaries for 40 years, but inhabited different worlds. Both composers were affected by cataclysmic changes and war, and musical...
Symphony
ORGAN SYMPHONY IN SSU ORCHESTRA CONCERT IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 29, 2018
Though Classical Sonoma seldom reviews student concerts, as ample North Coast concerts keep the staff of 11 reviewers busy. But the chance to hear the Sonoma State University Orchestra tackle St. SaŽnsí majestic Organ Symphony April 29 was a rare opportunity and not easily to be missed. Avec lí...
Symphony
SPLENDID JUPITER AND ZOOMING CONCERTO AT VALLEJO SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 15, 2018
Over the past two years the Vallejo Symphony has made big changes, moving from a stark middle school auditorium to the snazzy remodeled 1911-era downtown Empress Theater, and engaging Marc Taddei as its seventh conductor. April 15 was the seasonís final concert of the 86th season. In a programmin...
Symphony
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE VOICE AT SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, April 08, 2018
In an April 8 Santa Rosa Symphony concert filled to the brim with instruments--electric violin, vibraphone, marimba, xylophone, glockenspiel, keyboard samplers, harps, piano and myriad drums, gongs and bells, to say nothing of winds, brass and strings--the instrument that came out on top was the hum...
Symphony
HAMELIN'S HUSKY MOOD IN SCHROEDER RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 25, 2018
Convention in piano recitals has the artist coming on stage and playing. Canadian pianist Charles Richard-Hamelin walked on Schroeder Hallís stage March 25 and didnít play for six minutes, chatting with the audience. A risk for some artists. Then most programs include a contemporary or rarely play...
Symphony
ORFF AND HINDEMITH SONIC SPLENDOR AT FINAL SO CO PHIL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Sonoma County Philharmonic concerts are continually artistically successful but on the Santa Rosa High Schoolís stage the orchestra rarely numbers above 40, and in the 900-seat hall audiences can be scant. Violinists can be in short supply. An opposite scene occurred at the March 17/18 concert set...
Symphony
A FIFTH CONTENDER ENTERS THE RING FOR THE SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Saturday, February 10, 2018
In these international times, what makes a piece of music American? For Michael Christie, the answer is that it needs to have at least premiered on these shores, if not been composed here. Thus the rationale for the ďall AmericanĒ program that Christie--the fifth and final conducting candidate for t...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Sonoma County Philharmonic / Saturday, September 30, 2017
Norman Gamboa, conductor

Conductor Norman Gamboa

DVORAK AND TCHAIKOVSKY ORCHESTRAL COLOR AT SO CO PHIL SEASON OPENER

by Terry McNeill
Saturday, September 30, 2017

A concert with curious repertoire and splashy orchestral color launched the 19th season of the Sonoma County Philharmonic Sept. 30 in Santa Rosa High Schoolís Auditorium.

Why curious? Conductor Norman Gamboa paired the ever-popular Dvorak and his rarely heard 1891 trilogy In Natureís Realm, with the uncommonly heard first Symphony of Tchaikovsky. The G Minor Major Symphony doesnít have quite the emotional impact and tight construction of the iconic Fourth, Fifth and Sixth symphonies, but the seeds of the composerís greatness are everywhere to be heard in the early work from 1866 and revised in 1874 Ė stirring themes, virtuoso demands throughout each section, and at time volcanic climaxes. Itís long at 48 minutes but this performance was worth every second.

Mr. Gamboa made a number of decisions that served this florid music well. His tempos never were rushed, and he allowed soloists in several sections to continually shine. The Orchestraís winds have been at the heart of memorable performances for years, and here oboists Kris Krive, clarinetist Nick Xenelis, flutists Debra Scheuerman and Martha Krones, and bassoonist Miranda Kincaid were sterling all evening. In this Symphony the composer used winds for much of the thematic statements, supported by the violins, and the themes from the principal wind players were achingly extravagant.

At the big climaxes that characterize Tchaikovsky (as with Sibelius and Shostakovich) Mr. Gamboa had his hands full keeping the instrumental choirs, especially the high strings, clear and distinct from low strings. He was largely successful, especially in the adagio cantabile second movement, where the flute and oboe duets were captivating.

In the scherzo the playing was brisk and colorful, with the composerís mastery of pizzicato (brilliantly exploited later in his Fourth Symphony) piquant. A surprise came in the long introduction to the finale where the conductor drew extended phrases and deft rhythmic control from the Orchestra, making the transition to the magisterial allegro all the more striking and convincing. Here there were jolting echoes of Sibeliusí FInlandia (composed 34 years later!). The fugue textures were clear, again the product of virtuoso wind play and Mr. Gamboaís attention to cutoffs, the many modulations and section balance.

A raucous ovation from the audience of 250 brought the conductor back for one curtain call, but oddly no individual player recognition was chosen.

The concert began with the three Dvorak overtures Ė In Natureís Realm, Othello, and Carnaval. Only the last is frequently performed, and a chance to hear Othello was an unexpected treat. It was the most Wagnerian of the three with descending phrases and mysterious harmonies that Dvorak must have absorbed at Bayreuth. The Philharmonicís playing caught the somber and nostalgic mood of the work, although fast descending runs in the violins were often blurred. An occasional nod to Brucknerís music is in the Othello Overture.

In the first and third overtures contrast could not be starker. The bucolic Natureís Realm was played as an awakening of ravishing outdoor sound, lovely and never so persistent to mar a joyous mood. Though often overly loud with ragged entrances, the music had a quaint ballet character that was irresistible, and Mr. Gamboa gave lots of rhythmic leeway to achieve his conception of Dvorakís music stemming from Czech country tunes and dances. Clarinet and oboe playing was exemplary.

In the most ďDvorakĒ of the overtures the familiar Carnaval was appropriately blaring and rollicking. A third flute part was added to the mix, and flourishes from the augmented percussionists (cymbals, tambourine, triangle) gave spice to the rich sound. Itís a foot-tapping piece that exploits the brass and horns, and the Philharmonic seemed to enjoy playing the racy and heated music as much the audience did hearing it.

Verbal presentations before and during the concert underscored the Philharmonicís community volunteer and connections, and augur well for the new season that will feature demanding Lutoslawski, Nielsen and Hindemith compositions. Clearly Mr. Gamboa is setting a high bar.