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Chamber
BEETHOVEN FEATURED IN SF TRIO'S OCCIDENTAL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 19, 2020
Conventional repertoire in uncommonly good performances highlighted the San Francisco Piano Trio’s Jan. 19 concert in the Occidental Center for the Arts. Haydn’s No. 44 Trio (Hob. XV:28) came from late in his long career, when he was in and out of London, and received a sparkling reading that featu...
SIMONE PORTER ASPIRES TO STARDOM WITH SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 12, 2020
The Sibelius violin concerto is one of several mountains that violin soloists need to ascend before they can lay claim to stardom. Hundreds make the attempt every year, but only a few reach the top. Simone Porter, who played the concerto with the Santa Rosa Symphony on Sunday afternoon, got close bu...
Choral and Vocal
ORPHEUS OF AMSTERDAM'S MUSIC IN SCHROEDER ORGAN CHORAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, January 10, 2020
“All over the map.” Sonoma Bach, directed by Bob Worth, has taken its audiences this season on journeys through many centuries and many lands. The programming is fresh and intriguing and the performers varied and creators of beauty and interest. The January 10 program was centered on organ works by...
Choral and Vocal
OLD NORTH GERMAN CAROLS IN SONOMA BACH'S SCHROEDER CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, December 15, 2019
“Cast off all sorrows…also dance in heavenly fashion.” A volume called Piae Cantiones was printed in 1582 in North Germany, lively songs going back to the 14th century, and this treasure trove provided material for numerous composers to arrange Christmas carols over following generations, from simp...
Symphony
EVERLASTING LIGHT AT SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Monday, December 09, 2019
The Mozart Requiem includes four intermittent vocal soloists, but the real star is the choir, which is featured in almost every movement. That stardom shone bright at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s memorable Requiem performance on Monday night. The soloists were good, but the choir was superb. Located wi...
Symphony
UNFINISHED AND FINNISH
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 08, 2019
Having a new resident conductor on the podium for the Ukiah Symphony was an attractive invitation for a long-delayed visit to Mendocino College’s Center Theater Dec. 8. The insouciant Les Pfutzenreuter recently retired after decades of conducting the ensemble, replaced by Phillip Lenberg who also j...
Choral and Vocal
PRAERTORIUS IN RENAISSANCE GLORY FROM SONOMA BACH
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Sonoma Bach Choir, in collaboration with Barefoot All-Stars Viol Consort and The Whole Noyse Brass Ensemble, presented “Sing Glorious Praetorius!” November 16 to an almost full Schroeder Hall at the Green Music Center. The Soloists were soprano Dianna Morgan, Christopher Fritzsche, (countertenor), m...
Symphony
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL EXCITEMENT IN SO CO PHIL CONCERT IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Beginning with a scintillating reading of Rossini’s Overture to the Opera “Semiramide,” the Sonoma County Philharmonic performed a splendid program Nov. 16 in the Jackson Theater, and featured two additional works, one showcasing the winner of the San Francisco Conservatory’s Young Artist Award. It...
Chamber
SPIRITUAL LATE BEETHOVEN QUARTET HIGHLIGHTS MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 10, 2019
Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op. 131, called “unparalleled in its inexhaustibility” by critic Thomas May, is a daunting challenge. Orchestral in concept, filled with wit and charm, melancholy and fury, it almost overwhelms listeners. Playing the frenetic Scherzo, a viol...
Symphony
MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANCE IN UNIQUE SRS CONCERT IN WEILL HALL
by Terry McNeill
Monday, November 04, 2019
It was a concert full of surprises Nov. 4 as the Santa Rosa Symphony responded to the area’s wild fires and evacuations with challenging, songful and somewhat unique music in Weill Hall. The last of a three-concert series titled "Master of the Modern Banjo" is reviewed here. The evening began with...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Mastercard Performance Series / Friday, November 03, 2017
Marinsky Orchestra, Valery Gergiev, conductor. Denis Matsuev, piano

Conductor Valery Gergiev

TO RUSSIA WITH BRILLIANCE

by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 03, 2017

Russian pianist Denis Matsuev’s high velocity and frequently slam-bang virtuosity came to the Green Music Center last year with a thrilling and equally perplexing solo performance. So many in Weill Nov. 3 were interested to hear if his pianistic style would mesh well in a concerto, and with a fine orchestra. On this day it was the legendary Mariinsky Orchestra from St. Petersburg, under the baton of international star Valery Gergiev. Qualms were put to rest at the outset.

The answer for a paltry audience of 500 was joy and a huge ovation at the conclusion of Prokofiev’s G Minor (No. 2, Op. 16) Concerto. This work was absent from programs for many years, though the wonderful Jorge Bolet championed it and recently Yuja Wang has taken it up. The technical demands for the pianist, especially in the first movement cadenza but also throughout, are ferocious, and stamina is needed as well as speed and instrumental volume. Mr. Matsuev didn’t shy away from an immense and raucous sound, and he nailed the breakneck right hand skips and thunderous repeated bass chords with seeming ease. But certainly it wasn’t an easy matter to not be covered by the 75-piece Russian orchestra playing at full tilt. A different part of the artist’s technique was evident when he captured a far away mystical and faint sound at the reappearance in the coda of the work’s first theme.

In the scherzo’s perpetuam mobile and the intermezzo his playing was seldom below a mezzo forte, though the Orchestra’s low string sound was always husky. Mr. Matsuev uses shoulder and arm weight and ample but quick damper pedal to underscore the composer’s driving rhythms and deft references to parts of the First Concerto, written when a student and about a decade prior to the G Minor. The finale was more of the same thick and dense sound, rolling along at a fast clip of formidable virtuosity. He seems happiest when the music needs fleet fingers. Mr. Gergiev’s conducting faultlessly followed every demand in the score, and the Orchestra had the right blend of Prokofiev’s motoric momentum and raw dissonance.

Recalled to the stage Mr. Matsuev played as an encore a parched and super fast finale (allegretto) to Beethoven’s “Tempest” Sonata, Op. 31, No. 2.

Following intermission was the highlight of the evening, an amazing reading by Mr. Gergiev of Strauss’ turn-of-the-20th-Century tone poem Ein Heldenleben. Op. 40. From the opening chord growl of the bass and cello sections, the sound driving Weill’s mellow wood surfaces to perfection, the playing made it clear that a special musical event was to unfold.

Tempos in the five sections were brisk with section clarity brilliantly showcased, so different from the Concerto. Mr. Gergiev’s famous conducting technique with fluttering hands and seemingly awkward movements around a nonexistent podium, is sharply different from the “control” approach of conductors such as Bruno Ferrandis, Michael Tilson Thomas and Alan Gilbert. But make no mistake, control he has, and he crafted an orchestral fabric of great beauty and intense communication.

It’s impossible to single out the ensemble’s principals in the Strauss, as no names were in the printed program, and there was no identification in the Mariinsky’s Russian websites. However, I would be remiss not mention the concertmaster’s soaring solos; the elegant and commanding oboe, clarinet, flute and bassoon playing; and the superb unisons in the horn and trombone sections. Mr. Gergiev paid little attention to extended romantic ritards, preferring to use perfectly placed cutoffs to underscore drama, especially in the Hero at Battle section. The final ascending phrases in the solo violin were elegantly shaped by the conductor, and the long fermata that ended the 42-minute work that for me could have gone on for minutes.

This Ein Heldenleben was a champagne orgy of orchestra sound, perhaps surpassing even the glorious concerts in Weill years ago of the Russian National Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony and the Vienna Philharmonic.

The tumultuous applause produced an encore, a short brassy fanfare from Wagner’s opera Lohengrin.

Shostakovich’s E-Flat Major Symphony, Op. 70, opened the program and quickly disclosed the Mariinsky’s virtuosity. This Haydnesque Symphony is not to everyone’s taste, and some find it frivolous and overly brittle. I found the performance marvelous, the music fitting the St. Petersburg forces like an old shoe. The orchestra played it with great fervor and panache. Piccolo and flute playing was exemplary, as was cohesion in the upper strings. And the string mass, with second violins stage left, was rich and commanding.