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Choral and Vocal
SOMBER GERMAN POETRY IN SONG AT ROSCHMANN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 18, 2018
Two weeks does make a hefty difference. Feb. 3 saw the diva Renée Fleming beguile a full Weill Hall house in a mix of Brahms, Broadway show songs and Dvorak chestnuts. It was a gala event with couture gowns and colorful extra-musical communication between singer and her rapt audience. Dorothea Rösc...
Chamber
NOVEL AND FAMILIAR WORKS FROM THE TILDEN TRIO
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 11, 2018
North Coast chamber music fans have the luxury of two fine resident piano trios, with the frequently performing Trio Navarro at Sonoma State, and the Tilden Trio at San Rafael’s Dominican University. The Tilden plays less often, but their Feb. 11 performance brought several hundred to Angelico Hall ...
Symphony
A FIFTH CONTENDER ENTERS THE RING FOR THE SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Saturday, February 10, 2018
In these international times, what makes a piece of music American? For Michael Christie, the answer is that it needs to have at least premiered on these shores, if not been composed here. Thus the rationale for the “all American” program that Christie--the fifth and final conducting candidate for t...
Recital
HAUNTING RACHMANINOFF WORKS IN HU'S MAO RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, February 08, 2018
Ching-Yun Hu made a return Music at Oakmont appearance Feb. 8 in Berger Auditorium, reprising a recital she made in the same hall four years ago. Many of the recital’s trappings were the same, but the music Ms. Hu chose to play was decidedly different. All afternoon the pianist was in an aggressiv...
Chamber
A COMPLETE ARTISTIC PACKAGE IN FLEMING'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Vaida Falconbridge and Mary Beard
Saturday, February 03, 2018
The diva Renée Fleming strode on the Weill Hall stage Feb. 2 in her first couture gown of the evening, a gray and swirling cream strapless sheath with flamboyant coordinating stole. For this concert, Ms. Fleming stayed to somewhat lighter fare, foregoing heavier dramatic and coloratura arias for a v...
Recital
ZNAIDER-KULEK DUO CHARMS AND CHALLANGES WEILL AUDIENCE FEB. 2
by Terry McNeill
Friday, February 02, 2018
Weill hall has mounted several exceptional piano recitals, with Garrick Ohlsson’s titanic Liszt concert, and of course Lang Lang’s two insouciant but also compelling performances topping the list since 2013. But arguably the virtuoso violinists have on balance been more impressive, and thoughts g...
Chamber
VIVID GERMAN ROMANTICISM IN VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT IN SCHROEDER
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, January 27, 2018
Though not new to Sonoma County, the Valley of the Moon Music Festival (VOM) concerts are relatively recent in the Green Music Center’s Schroeder Hall. So the first of three spring concerts Jan. 27 provided a picture of what’s in the repertoire leading up to their Festival this summer at Sonoma’s Ha...
Symphony
MONUMENTAL NIELSEN SYMPHONY CAPS SO CO PHIL CONCERT AT SR HS
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, January 27, 2018
Turning again away from conventional repertoire, the Sonoma County Philharmonic programmed Jan. 27 three works in what were local debut performances in Santa Rosa High School’s Performing Arts Center. Nielsen’s Fourth Symphony, Op. 29, called “Inextinguishable,” closed the program with an extravaga...
Chamber
ECLECTIC ANDERSON & ROE TRANSCRIPTIONS CAPTIVATE WEILL HALL AUDIENCE
by Nicki Bell
Sunday, January 21, 2018
From the first moment when Greg Anderson and Elizabeth Joy Roe walked Jan. 21 on the Weill Hall stage and spoke to the audience about their two-piano program, it was clear that an afternoon of drama, humor, virtuosity, warmth, transcendence and excitement was in store. This dynamic and mesmerizing ...
Chamber
BALCOM TRIO HIGHLIGHTS DELPHI'S RAC CONCERT IN OCCIDENTAL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, January 20, 2018
The Redwood Arts Council audience first met the Delphi Trio (Jeffrey LaDeur, (piano), Liana Berube (violin), and cellist Michelle Kwon) in 2013, and subsequent concerts in the same Occidental hall have become crowd favorites. The January 20th program before a capacity audience seemed to have enthus...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Sonoma County Philharmonic / Saturday, November 18, 2017
Norman Gamboa, conductor. Pam Otsuka, violin; Robby Morales, viola

Violist Robby Morales

SONIC SPLASH AND ENSEMBLE DELICACY AT SO CO PHIL CONCERT

by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 18, 2017

Franck’s wonderful D Minor Symphony is a rarity on today’s concert programs, and I can’t remember a North Bay performance in many years from any of the six resident area orchestras. So it was good to see the Sonoma County Philharmonic feature it in their Nov. 18 and 19 concerts at Santa Rosa High School. The first of the set is reviewed here.

The Belgian composer’s only Symphony is difficult structurally to perform, though underpinned by the recurring them in each of the three movements. To some it’s a theme bordering on banality, and to others it’s a theme of nobility crafted and ingeniously developed by the seasoned master in 1889, shortly before his death. Conductor Norman Gamboa drew from his Orchestra a performance of considerable power and excitement. The many short climaxes of the opening allegro gave cumulative cohesion to the sound, with faint references to the beguiling contemporary harmonies of Wager’s operas and Liszt’s tone poems.

Christina Kopriva’s harp solo opened the andante were Chris Krive’s elegant oboe solo over murmuring string pizzicato was a highlight. Tempos were judicious throughout, and the sonic momentum of the first movement’s allegro returned in the finale. The brass sounded heroically and Anthony Perry’s plaintive English horn solos were handsome. Mr. Gamboa built an apex of Franck’s inspired drama, anticipating the cutoff at the ending that has always seemed to me too short and inconclusive. Audience response was warm and loud.

Mozart’s E-Flat Major Symphonia Concertante (K. 364) was the capstone of the first half and featured as soloists two of the So Co Phil’s principals, violinist Pam Otsuka and violist Robby Morales. Jeffrey Kahane conducted a memorable performance of the work in Weill two summers ago, and Mr. Gamboa’s interpretation shared many of the same felicities – attention to small details, chaste phrasing and soloist support. The music from 1779 is of course sharply different from the two other works on the program, with a reduced size ensemble and needing transparency of sound rather than robust volume and thick textures.

The long introduction (the soloists played through the tutti) to the allegro maestoso led to the opening solo entrances, both well played and indicating, especially in the cadenzas where seemingly ample rehearsal time was spent. The goal here is to capture the music’s delicacy, but always wrapped in impeccable instrumental technique and balance. It’s odd that pitch and phrase coordination in these luscious cadenzaduos mostly avoided the intonation deficiencies and blurring in short trills and turns that were often present when playing in the first movement’s ensemble. Mr. Morales overcame these pesky problems in the lovely sadness and lament of the andante where his bottom register tone was burnished and secure.

Tricky horn phrases opened the presto finale and the orchestra exhibited some of the most cohesive playing of the evening, deftly controlled by the conductor. The slower-than-usual tempo allowed Ms. Otsuka’s violin line to soar and carry to the back row of the acoustically lively hall. Her violin tone was lambent, alternatively melding and contrasting with Mr. Morales. Greeting the soloists after the final convincing chord were a standing ovation and several presentation bouquets.

Opening the evening was a rollicking eight-minute playing of Shostakovich’s Festive Overture. It was a snazzy way to begin and always an audience favorite, as evidenced by recent local performances by the Santa Rosa Symphony, Russian National Orchestra, Mariinsky Orchestra and the Mendocino Music Festival Orchestra. Outstanding in this exciting romp were Mary Kemnec’s piccolo playing, and the persuasive solos of flutists Debra Scheuerman and Emily Reynolds. Mr. Gamboa conducted without score.