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Chamber
BEETHOVEN FEATURED IN SF TRIO'S OCCIDENTAL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 19, 2020
Conventional repertoire in uncommonly good performances highlighted the San Francisco Piano Trio’s Jan. 19 concert in the Occidental Center for the Arts. Haydn’s No. 44 Trio (Hob. XV:28) came from late in his long career, when he was in and out of London, and received a sparkling reading that featu...
SIMONE PORTER ASPIRES TO STARDOM WITH SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 12, 2020
The Sibelius violin concerto is one of several mountains that violin soloists need to ascend before they can lay claim to stardom. Hundreds make the attempt every year, but only a few reach the top. Simone Porter, who played the concerto with the Santa Rosa Symphony on Sunday afternoon, got close bu...
Choral and Vocal
ORPHEUS OF AMSTERDAM'S MUSIC IN SCHROEDER ORGAN CHORAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, January 10, 2020
“All over the map.” Sonoma Bach, directed by Bob Worth, has taken its audiences this season on journeys through many centuries and many lands. The programming is fresh and intriguing and the performers varied and creators of beauty and interest. The January 10 program was centered on organ works by...
Choral and Vocal
OLD NORTH GERMAN CAROLS IN SONOMA BACH'S SCHROEDER CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, December 15, 2019
“Cast off all sorrows…also dance in heavenly fashion.” A volume called Piae Cantiones was printed in 1582 in North Germany, lively songs going back to the 14th century, and this treasure trove provided material for numerous composers to arrange Christmas carols over following generations, from simp...
Symphony
EVERLASTING LIGHT AT SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Monday, December 09, 2019
The Mozart Requiem includes four intermittent vocal soloists, but the real star is the choir, which is featured in almost every movement. That stardom shone bright at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s memorable Requiem performance on Monday night. The soloists were good, but the choir was superb. Located wi...
Symphony
UNFINISHED AND FINNISH
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 08, 2019
Having a new resident conductor on the podium for the Ukiah Symphony was an attractive invitation for a long-delayed visit to Mendocino College’s Center Theater Dec. 8. The insouciant Les Pfutzenreuter recently retired after decades of conducting the ensemble, replaced by Phillip Lenberg who also j...
Choral and Vocal
PRAERTORIUS IN RENAISSANCE GLORY FROM SONOMA BACH
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Sonoma Bach Choir, in collaboration with Barefoot All-Stars Viol Consort and The Whole Noyse Brass Ensemble, presented “Sing Glorious Praetorius!” November 16 to an almost full Schroeder Hall at the Green Music Center. The Soloists were soprano Dianna Morgan, Christopher Fritzsche, (countertenor), m...
Symphony
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL EXCITEMENT IN SO CO PHIL CONCERT IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Beginning with a scintillating reading of Rossini’s Overture to the Opera “Semiramide,” the Sonoma County Philharmonic performed a splendid program Nov. 16 in the Jackson Theater, and featured two additional works, one showcasing the winner of the San Francisco Conservatory’s Young Artist Award. It...
Chamber
SPIRITUAL LATE BEETHOVEN QUARTET HIGHLIGHTS MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 10, 2019
Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op. 131, called “unparalleled in its inexhaustibility” by critic Thomas May, is a daunting challenge. Orchestral in concept, filled with wit and charm, melancholy and fury, it almost overwhelms listeners. Playing the frenetic Scherzo, a viol...
Symphony
MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANCE IN UNIQUE SRS CONCERT IN WEILL HALL
by Terry McNeill
Monday, November 04, 2019
It was a concert full of surprises Nov. 4 as the Santa Rosa Symphony responded to the area’s wild fires and evacuations with challenging, songful and somewhat unique music in Weill Hall. The last of a three-concert series titled "Master of the Modern Banjo" is reviewed here. The evening began with...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Sonoma County Philharmonic / Saturday, November 18, 2017
Norman Gamboa, conductor. Pam Otsuka, violin; Robby Morales, viola

Violist Robby Morales

SONIC SPLASH AND ENSEMBLE DELICACY AT SO CO PHIL CONCERT

by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 18, 2017

Franck’s wonderful D Minor Symphony is a rarity on today’s concert programs, and I can’t remember a North Bay performance in many years from any of the six resident area orchestras. So it was good to see the Sonoma County Philharmonic feature it in their Nov. 18 and 19 concerts at Santa Rosa High School. The first of the set is reviewed here.

The Belgian composer’s only Symphony is difficult structurally to perform, though underpinned by the recurring them in each of the three movements. To some it’s a theme bordering on banality, and to others it’s a theme of nobility crafted and ingeniously developed by the seasoned master in 1889, shortly before his death. Conductor Norman Gamboa drew from his Orchestra a performance of considerable power and excitement. The many short climaxes of the opening allegro gave cumulative cohesion to the sound, with faint references to the beguiling contemporary harmonies of Wager’s operas and Liszt’s tone poems.

Christina Kopriva’s harp solo opened the andante were Chris Krive’s elegant oboe solo over murmuring string pizzicato was a highlight. Tempos were judicious throughout, and the sonic momentum of the first movement’s allegro returned in the finale. The brass sounded heroically and Anthony Perry’s plaintive English horn solos were handsome. Mr. Gamboa built an apex of Franck’s inspired drama, anticipating the cutoff at the ending that has always seemed to me too short and inconclusive. Audience response was warm and loud.

Mozart’s E-Flat Major Symphonia Concertante (K. 364) was the capstone of the first half and featured as soloists two of the So Co Phil’s principals, violinist Pam Otsuka and violist Robby Morales. Jeffrey Kahane conducted a memorable performance of the work in Weill two summers ago, and Mr. Gamboa’s interpretation shared many of the same felicities – attention to small details, chaste phrasing and soloist support. The music from 1779 is of course sharply different from the two other works on the program, with a reduced size ensemble and needing transparency of sound rather than robust volume and thick textures.

The long introduction (the soloists played through the tutti) to the allegro maestoso led to the opening solo entrances, both well played and indicating, especially in the cadenzas where seemingly ample rehearsal time was spent. The goal here is to capture the music’s delicacy, but always wrapped in impeccable instrumental technique and balance. It’s odd that pitch and phrase coordination in these luscious cadenzaduos mostly avoided the intonation deficiencies and blurring in short trills and turns that were often present when playing in the first movement’s ensemble. Mr. Morales overcame these pesky problems in the lovely sadness and lament of the andante where his bottom register tone was burnished and secure.

Tricky horn phrases opened the presto finale and the orchestra exhibited some of the most cohesive playing of the evening, deftly controlled by the conductor. The slower-than-usual tempo allowed Ms. Otsuka’s violin line to soar and carry to the back row of the acoustically lively hall. Her violin tone was lambent, alternatively melding and contrasting with Mr. Morales. Greeting the soloists after the final convincing chord were a standing ovation and several presentation bouquets.

Opening the evening was a rollicking eight-minute playing of Shostakovich’s Festive Overture. It was a snazzy way to begin and always an audience favorite, as evidenced by recent local performances by the Santa Rosa Symphony, Russian National Orchestra, Mariinsky Orchestra and the Mendocino Music Festival Orchestra. Outstanding in this exciting romp were Mary Kemnec’s piccolo playing, and the persuasive solos of flutists Debra Scheuerman and Emily Reynolds. Mr. Gamboa conducted without score.