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Chamber
BEETHOVEN FEATURED IN SF TRIO'S OCCIDENTAL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 19, 2020
Conventional repertoire in uncommonly good performances highlighted the San Francisco Piano Trio’s Jan. 19 concert in the Occidental Center for the Arts. Haydn’s No. 44 Trio (Hob. XV:28) came from late in his long career, when he was in and out of London, and received a sparkling reading that featu...
SIMONE PORTER ASPIRES TO STARDOM WITH SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 12, 2020
The Sibelius violin concerto is one of several mountains that violin soloists need to ascend before they can lay claim to stardom. Hundreds make the attempt every year, but only a few reach the top. Simone Porter, who played the concerto with the Santa Rosa Symphony on Sunday afternoon, got close bu...
Choral and Vocal
ORPHEUS OF AMSTERDAM'S MUSIC IN SCHROEDER ORGAN CHORAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, January 10, 2020
“All over the map.” Sonoma Bach, directed by Bob Worth, has taken its audiences this season on journeys through many centuries and many lands. The programming is fresh and intriguing and the performers varied and creators of beauty and interest. The January 10 program was centered on organ works by...
Choral and Vocal
OLD NORTH GERMAN CAROLS IN SONOMA BACH'S SCHROEDER CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Sunday, December 15, 2019
“Cast off all sorrows…also dance in heavenly fashion.” A volume called Piae Cantiones was printed in 1582 in North Germany, lively songs going back to the 14th century, and this treasure trove provided material for numerous composers to arrange Christmas carols over following generations, from simp...
Symphony
EVERLASTING LIGHT AT SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Monday, December 09, 2019
The Mozart Requiem includes four intermittent vocal soloists, but the real star is the choir, which is featured in almost every movement. That stardom shone bright at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s memorable Requiem performance on Monday night. The soloists were good, but the choir was superb. Located wi...
Symphony
UNFINISHED AND FINNISH
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 08, 2019
Having a new resident conductor on the podium for the Ukiah Symphony was an attractive invitation for a long-delayed visit to Mendocino College’s Center Theater Dec. 8. The insouciant Les Pfutzenreuter recently retired after decades of conducting the ensemble, replaced by Phillip Lenberg who also j...
Choral and Vocal
PRAERTORIUS IN RENAISSANCE GLORY FROM SONOMA BACH
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Sonoma Bach Choir, in collaboration with Barefoot All-Stars Viol Consort and The Whole Noyse Brass Ensemble, presented “Sing Glorious Praetorius!” November 16 to an almost full Schroeder Hall at the Green Music Center. The Soloists were soprano Dianna Morgan, Christopher Fritzsche, (countertenor), m...
Symphony
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL EXCITEMENT IN SO CO PHIL CONCERT IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Beginning with a scintillating reading of Rossini’s Overture to the Opera “Semiramide,” the Sonoma County Philharmonic performed a splendid program Nov. 16 in the Jackson Theater, and featured two additional works, one showcasing the winner of the San Francisco Conservatory’s Young Artist Award. It...
Chamber
SPIRITUAL LATE BEETHOVEN QUARTET HIGHLIGHTS MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 10, 2019
Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp minor, Op. 131, called “unparalleled in its inexhaustibility” by critic Thomas May, is a daunting challenge. Orchestral in concept, filled with wit and charm, melancholy and fury, it almost overwhelms listeners. Playing the frenetic Scherzo, a viol...
Symphony
MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANCE IN UNIQUE SRS CONCERT IN WEILL HALL
by Terry McNeill
Monday, November 04, 2019
It was a concert full of surprises Nov. 4 as the Santa Rosa Symphony responded to the area’s wild fires and evacuations with challenging, songful and somewhat unique music in Weill Hall. The last of a three-concert series titled "Master of the Modern Banjo" is reviewed here. The evening began with...
RECITAL REVIEW
Sky Hill Cultural Alliance / Friday, May 25, 2018
Jura Margulis, piano

Yura Margulis May 25 (K. Asbo Photo)

MUSICAL ALCHEMY INSIDE A HIDDEN GEM

by Kayleen Asbo
Friday, May 25, 2018

The Petaluma Historical Library and Museum is a hidden gem of Sonoma County, a gracious building that is one of Sonoma County’s loveliest venues for chamber music concerts, with a fine period piano particularly suited to Romantic music.  Of the surprisingly large array of festivities there, one of the most anticipated each spring is the annual appearance of pianist Yura Margulis.
 
Mr. Margulis is a professor of piano at the Musica and Arts University in Vienna, and the May 25 recital affirmed his reputation as a stellar artist of Romantic sensibilities. 
 
Mr. Margulis began with comments to the audience on music as language, and in his words, “Music only reveals the truth. It does not lie”. The first half of the program consisted of six Scarlatti sonatas.  These are little baroque jewels, each one revealing a different facet of Mr. Margulis’s charismatic musical personality, from the  plaintive and haunting F Minor to the jaunty and bold military-inspired E Major.  By turns playful, aggressive and tender, Mr. Margulis’s emotional range in this music was truly breathtaking.  If he took liberties of rhythm, articulation and pedaling unimaginable to the Baroque era, his interpretations were still always thought provoking and deeply felt, with a nuanced interweaving of voices.  

The concluding D Minor prestissimo was a marvel of pianistic technique: rapid fire repeated note passages, swirling scales in thirds and perfectly even trills. Evoking the fire of a flamenco dancer (Scarlatti wrote this so-called Iberian sonata while living in Spain) the pianist left audience members gasping in astonishment and laughing with delight and disbelief at his bravura  precision.
 
Following a gracious intermission of gratis wine and cheese, Mr. Margulis turned to Russian music. A performance of Tchaikovsky’s Op. 59 Dumka (from 1886) was redolent with both inward, lyrical sensibility and heroic grandeur. The soulfulness of Russian folksongs emerged in its musical unfolding, seemingly drawing the audience inwards. It was in the four Preludes that concluded the program that true magic emerged. One could not wish for a pianist more deeply connected to the spirit of Rachmaninoff’s music, and each piece unfolded as an enchanting meditation aching with longing. The gossamer delicacy and poignancy of the G-Sharp Minor Prelude (Op. 32, No. 12) wove a spell of wonder, while the concluding G Minor (Op. 23, No. 5) erupted with molten passion.  This last prelude requires the most herculean of keyboard techniques to master its thunderous military octaves and yet demands the most elegant and lyric spirit to render its pleading middle section.

The artist’s virtuosity generated a standing ovation before the final chord, reflecting his potent musical alchemy. Mr. Margulis’s encore was the Scriabin Prelude in C sharp for Left Hand, Op. 9, No. 1. The poetic spirit and rich tone color warmed the heart and could not have been more satisfying.