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Symphony
SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY HERALDS THE HOLIDAYS
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, December 02, 2018
Antlers are typical headgear during the holiday season, but the ushers and one bassist at the Santa Rosa Symphony concert on Dec. 2 sported apples atop their heads. The red fruits were festive but perplexing until the orchestra began Rossini’s “William Tell” overture, at which point even the dull-wi...
Symphony
A HERO'S ODYSSEY IN SO CO PHIL CONCERT
by Art Hofmann
Sunday, November 18, 2018
The audience at the Sonoma County Philharmonic’s Nov. 18 concert was warned at the outset that the old Santa Rosa High School auditorium boiler was turned off, and there was a steady eminently audible tone in the hall. Conductor Norman Gamboa said the tone was an A, a high one. But there it was, a...
Recital
MTA BENEFIT CONCERT FEATURES FAURE, DVORAK, JANACEK AND BARBER WORKS
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 11, 2018
In a splendid concert Nov. 11 the Music Teachers Association of California, Sonoma County Chapter, presented their sixth annual benefit concert before 40 avid listeners in the Santa Rosa home of Helen Howard and Robert Yeats. Highlights of the performances, involving eight musicians in various perf...
Recital
SERKIN'S SINGULAR MOZART AND BACH PLAYING IN WEILL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 09, 2018
Returning to Weill Hall following a fire-related recital cancellation in 2017, pianist Peter Serkin programmed just three works in his Nov. 7 concert, three masterworks that challenged both artist and audience alike. It needs to be said at the outset that Mr. Serkin takes a decidedly non-standard a...
Chamber
LUMINOUS FAURE TOPS LINCOLN TRIO'S SPRING LAKE VILLAGE CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, November 07, 2018
Familiarity in chamber music often evokes warm appreciation, and it was thus Nov. 7 when the Chicago-based Lincoln Piano Trio made one of their many Sonoma County appearances, this time on the Spring Lake Village Classical Music Series. Regularly presented by local impresario Robert Hayden, the Lin...
Symphony
PEACE AND LOVE FROM THE SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, November 04, 2018
Before the Santa Rosa Symphony’s Nov. 4 performance of Leonard Bernstein’s “Symphonic Dances from West Side Story,” Symphony CEO Alan Silow took a moment to acknowledge the victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack and to observe that music offers a more peaceful and loving view of the world. Mr. ...
Chamber
ATOS TRIO IN MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 04, 2018
When the ATOS Piano Trio planned their all-Russian touring program at their Berlin home base, it had a strong elegiac, even tragic theme that surely resonated with their Mill Valley Chamber Music Society audience Nov. 4 in Mill Valley. Comprised of Annette von Hehn, violin; Thomas Hoppe, piano; and...
Chamber
ATOS TRIO IN OCCIDENTAL CHAMBER CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 03, 2018
When the Berlin-based ATOS Piano Trio entered the cramped Occidental Performing Arts stage Nov. 3, the audience of 100 anticipated familiar works in the announced all-Russian program. What they got was a selection of rarely-plays trios, with a gamut of emotions. Then one-movement Rachmaninoff G Mi...
Symphony
MIGHTY SHOSTAKOVICH 10TH OPENS MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 28, 2018
Just two works were on the opening program of the Marin Symphony’s 67th season Oct. 28, Tchaikovsky’s iconic D Major Violin Concerto, and Shostakovich’s Tenth Symphony. Before a full house in the Marin Center Auditorium conductor Alasdair Neale set a judicious opening tempo in the brief orchestra i...
Symphony
VIVALDI FOR ALL SEASONS IN WEILL BAROQUE CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, October 27, 2018
The Venice Baroque Orchestra, a dozen superb musicians that include strings, harpsichord and recorder, played an uplifting concert Oct. 27 of mostly Vivaldi sinfonias and concertos. The Weill Hall audience of 600 had rapt attention throughout, and the playing was of the highest musical level. This r...
RECITAL REVIEW
Green Music Center / Sunday, October 21, 2018
Steven Lin, piano

Steven Lin addressing Oct. 21 his Schroeder Hall Audience

LIN'S PIANISM AND PERSONA CHARM SCHROEDER HALL AUDIENCE

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 21, 2018

In somewhat of a surprise a sold out Schroeder Hall audience greeted pianist Steven Lin Oct. 21 in his local debut recital. Why a surprise? Because Mr. Lin was pretty much unknown in Northern California, and Schroeder is rarely, very rarely sold out for a single instrumentalist.

But no matter, and the young Curtis Institute-trained artist played a conventional but thoroughly exciting concert that drew two standing ovations. He began with a piece that was in every amateur and professional pianist’s repertoire 120 years ago, but hasn’t been heard here for years - Mendelssohn’s Op. 14 Rondo Capriccioso. Mr. Lin teased the music with lots of little tempo changes, and gave an initial impression that he was going to be happiest this afternoon when his fingers were busiest. Part of the coda was played piano and he used the shift pedal over long stretches. It was good to hear an old warhorse played with such fervor and singularity.

Arrangements of four Gershwin Broadway tunes followed, and passed without much notice. These were not the familiar Earl Wild transcriptions, and I suspect given the bouncy and colorful character they were Mr. Lin’s creations. The best playing came in the slam bang “Oh Lady be Good” and the palm court waltz nature of “Strike Up the Band.” Gershwin’s immense popularity had little effect here.

Schumann’s eight-part Kreisleriana (Op. 16) was preceded by remarks from the stage by the pianist, as there were no program notes. Mr. Lin exhibited a charming connection with his audience, but segments of his descriptions and analogies seemed mostly sophomoric. The playing proved otherwise, as in the beginning ausserst bewegt his rhythmic authority and tone color generated by constant shift pedal use promised an exciting traversal of the 1838 work, written according to Mr. Lin in four days.

In this often bass-heavy music Mr. Linn made the most of orchestral sonorities in the sehr aufgeregt section and lots of muscular left-hand sforzandos. His octave and double-note technique was impressive throughout, and he provided lovely tonal control in the B Flat sehr langsam. The playing emphasized counterpoint and sporadic inner voices, and he pushed the tempo in sehr rasch to generate raucous effects. A light touch was heard in the finale with its offbeat accents, and the last chords were played softly, not staccato and with pedal.

After intermission remarks from the stage regarding humor in Beethoven’s music led into an ingratiating performance of the E-Flat Major “Hunt” Sonata, Op. 31, No. 3. Mr. Lin is right, as there is ample humor in this Beethoven, as well as the nearly contemporary C Major “Waldstein” Sonata’s first movement. His tempo in the opening allegro was decorous, in the mean between Radu Lupu’s recent soporific playing in Napa, and a more quick nervous speed. The pianist tended to be fussy and teasing with the rhythms, and used long fermatas at intervals, but his rapid-fire scales, shaped trills and passagework were immaculate. Staccato technique in the scherzo was equally impressive.

In the sprightly finale (presto con fuoco) the performance was again exciting but also idiosyncratic, and at places overplayed and inchoate. Contrasts were underscored at the expense of balance. That said, it was a virtuosic reading with distinct individuality and interest, and he clearly loves the work’s gaiety.

The recital closed with Liszt’s Mephisto Waltz No. 1, S. 110. There are three additional Mephisto Waltzes, written late in the composer’s life with complex harmonies, but virtuosos shun them and always opt for No. 1. Coincidentally I heard in an Oct. 12 recital the fastest Mephisto One (with light pedal) in my experience, and at times Mr. Lin’s speed approached the one from a Russian pianist in South Carolina. Mr. Lin captured the picturesque nature of the music in 11 minutes, and his right-hand skips, husky chord playing and stamina never failed him.

A standing ovation engendered more stage remarks, this time concerning a California couple that had helped Mr. Lin’s early career, and he dedicated his performance of Debussy’s Claire de Lune (from Suite Bergamasque) to them. The playing of the encore had a limpid tone and a stately tempo, and was a happy reprieve from the whirlwind force of the Liszt.