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Choral and Vocal
NOBLE BRAHMS REQUIEM PERFORMANCE CLOSES SONOMA BACH'S SEASON
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, June 01, 2019
Sonoma Bach, conducted by Robert Worth, presented a truly grand finale to their 2018-19 "Light Out of Darkness" season in two sold out Schroeder Hall performances June 1 and 2. The program "A Human Requiem" was received rapturously with a well-deserved standing ovation for the main work, Brahms' ...
Chamber
THREE SONG CYCLES HIGHLIGHT VIBRANT SLV RECITAL
by Pamela Hicks-Gailey
Wednesday, May 08, 2019
An ambitious recital of vocal and piano music was presented May 8 at Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village by mezzo-soprano Kindra Scharich and pianist Jeffrey LaDeur. The duo engaged the enthusiastic audience with scholarly friendliness and artistry in performances of Beethoven's short cycle of six song...
Symphony
ALEXANDER TORADZE DELIVERS A LESSON IN SERENITY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 05, 2019
An entire concerto movement consisting of serene piano melodies over a soothing backdrop is probably not the first thing that springs to mind when seeing Shostakovich’s name on an orchestra program, but that’s exactly what pianist Alexander Toradze delivered--twice--at Sunday’s Santa Rosa Symphony c...
Symphony
MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON CLOSES WITH AUTUMNAL ELGAR AND THEATRICAL BEETHOVEN
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, April 28, 2019
Mozart’s enchanting Overture to his opera The Magic Flute, a miniature tapestry of gems from the 1791 work, opened the Marin Symphony’s final concert of the 2018-2019 season. Under conductor Alasdair Neale, the playing of the sprightly seven-minute piece by a reduced-size classical ensemble sparkled...
Recital
SHAHAM-EGUCHI DUO'S EXCITING MUSICAL GENEROSITY IN WEILL
by Abby Wasserman
Friday, April 26, 2019
Violinist Gil Shaham may be the most modest virtuoso on the concert stage today, and it is the great music he most wishes to put forward, never himself. Generosity, a quality he is known for, was abundantly clear in Weill Hall April 26 when he performed, with pianist Akira Eguchi, a generous program...
Recital
GLITTERING PIANISM IN LI'S OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Piano prodigies have always been a fascination for the music public, and the greatest of them (some were Mozart, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Saint Saëns, Hofmann) went on to legendary fame. George Li, who made is local debut at a Music at Oakmont recital April 11, was a remarkable recent keyboard prodigy t...
Symphony
SO CO PHIL'S SEASON CLOSER WITH EXPANSIVE PROKOFIEV 5TH IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 07, 2019
Closing their 20th season with their usual programming aplomb, the Sonoma County Philharmonic played a provocative set of concerts April 6 and 7 in the Jackson Theater, the Orchestra’s new home at the Sonoma Country Day School by the Sonoma County Airport. Local composer Nolan Gasser’s Sonoma Overt...
Choral and Vocal
SISTINE CHAPEL INSPIRATION FOR THE TALLIS SCHOLARS IN WEILL HALL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, April 05, 2019
Returning to Weill Hall April 5 after a seven year absence, the ten singers of the Tallis Scholars brought the sacred choral tradition of Palestrina and his contemporaries to an audience of delighted music lovers. Under the direction of Peter Phillips, the 1973 founder of the group, the program was...
Symphony
AUTUMNAL SIBELIUS 7TH HIGHLIGHTS VSO'S SEASON CLOSING CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 31, 2019
Closing their 87th Season March 30 and 31 the Vallejo Symphony has moved from a single weekend concert to a set of two, and the late March response was two full houses in the charming downtown Vallejo Empress Theater. Conductor Marc Taddei opened the Sunday program with a rousing performance of B...
Recital
SHARED INSTRUMENTAL BEAUTY IN VIEAUX-MEYERS WEILL HALL CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, March 30, 2019
Exciting timbral sound and intricate counterpoint, made possible when two artists with complementary instruments play together, were richly explored by violinist Anne Akiko Meyers and guitarist Jason Vieaux March 30 in Weill Hall. Whether in close harmony, or unison, or weaving separate melodies to...
RECITAL REVIEW
Green Music Center / Sunday, October 21, 2018
Steven Lin, piano

Steven Lin addressing Oct. 21 his Schroeder Hall Audience

LIN'S PIANISM AND PERSONA CHARM SCHROEDER HALL AUDIENCE

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 21, 2018

In somewhat of a surprise a sold out Schroeder Hall audience greeted pianist Steven Lin Oct. 21 in his local debut recital. Why a surprise? Because Mr. Lin was pretty much unknown in Northern California, and Schroeder is rarely, very rarely sold out for a single instrumentalist.

But no matter, and the young Curtis Institute-trained artist played a conventional but thoroughly exciting concert that drew two standing ovations. He began with a piece that was in every amateur and professional pianist’s repertoire 120 years ago, but hasn’t been heard here for years - Mendelssohn’s Op. 14 Rondo Capriccioso. Mr. Lin teased the music with lots of little tempo changes, and gave an initial impression that he was going to be happiest this afternoon when his fingers were busiest. Part of the coda was played piano and he used the shift pedal over long stretches. It was good to hear an old warhorse played with such fervor and singularity.

Arrangements of four Gershwin Broadway tunes followed, and passed without much notice. These were not the familiar Earl Wild transcriptions, and I suspect given the bouncy and colorful character they were Mr. Lin’s creations. The best playing came in the slam bang “Oh Lady be Good” and the palm court waltz nature of “Strike Up the Band.” Gershwin’s immense popularity had little effect here.

Schumann’s eight-part Kreisleriana (Op. 16) was preceded by remarks from the stage by the pianist, as there were no program notes. Mr. Lin exhibited a charming connection with his audience, but segments of his descriptions and analogies seemed mostly sophomoric. The playing proved otherwise, as in the beginning ausserst bewegt his rhythmic authority and tone color generated by constant shift pedal use promised an exciting traversal of the 1838 work, written according to Mr. Lin in four days.

In this often bass-heavy music Mr. Linn made the most of orchestral sonorities in the sehr aufgeregt section and lots of muscular left-hand sforzandos. His octave and double-note technique was impressive throughout, and he provided lovely tonal control in the B Flat sehr langsam. The playing emphasized counterpoint and sporadic inner voices, and he pushed the tempo in sehr rasch to generate raucous effects. A light touch was heard in the finale with its offbeat accents, and the last chords were played softly, not staccato and with pedal.

After intermission remarks from the stage regarding humor in Beethoven’s music led into an ingratiating performance of the E-Flat Major “Hunt” Sonata, Op. 31, No. 3. Mr. Lin is right, as there is ample humor in this Beethoven, as well as the nearly contemporary C Major “Waldstein” Sonata’s first movement. His tempo in the opening allegro was decorous, in the mean between Radu Lupu’s recent soporific playing in Napa, and a more quick nervous speed. The pianist tended to be fussy and teasing with the rhythms, and used long fermatas at intervals, but his rapid-fire scales, shaped trills and passagework were immaculate. Staccato technique in the scherzo was equally impressive.

In the sprightly finale (presto con fuoco) the performance was again exciting but also idiosyncratic, and at places overplayed and inchoate. Contrasts were underscored at the expense of balance. That said, it was a virtuosic reading with distinct individuality and interest, and he clearly loves the work’s gaiety.

The recital closed with Liszt’s Mephisto Waltz No. 1, S. 110. There are three additional Mephisto Waltzes, written late in the composer’s life with complex harmonies, but virtuosos shun them and always opt for No. 1. Coincidentally I heard in an Oct. 12 recital the fastest Mephisto One (with light pedal) in my experience, and at times Mr. Lin’s speed approached the one from a Russian pianist in South Carolina. Mr. Lin captured the picturesque nature of the music in 11 minutes, and his right-hand skips, husky chord playing and stamina never failed him.

A standing ovation engendered more stage remarks, this time concerning a California couple that had helped Mr. Lin’s early career, and he dedicated his performance of Debussy’s Claire de Lune (from Suite Bergamasque) to them. The playing of the encore had a limpid tone and a stately tempo, and was a happy reprieve from the whirlwind force of the Liszt.