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Chamber
PERFORMER AS PROMOTER: CLARA SCHUMANN AND MUSICAL SALONS CLOSE VOM FESTIVAL
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, July 28, 2019
The July 28 closing performance of the Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival could have been subtitled "Friends", as it was devoted to works by both Clara and Robert Schumann, and those of their friends and protégés Brahms and virtuoso violinist Joseph Joachim, with whom Clara toured extensively...
Chamber
ROMANTIC CHAMBER WORKS HIGHLIGHT VOM FESTIVAL AT HANNA CENTER
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 27, 2019
Now in its 5th season the Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival presented July 27 a concert titled “My Brilliant Sister,” featuring Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel’s compositions for combinations of voice, fortepiano and strings. Fanny and her brother Felix were close, and Felix occasionally published ...
Symphony
ROMANTIC DREAMS AT THE MENDOCINO MUSIC FESTIVAL
by Kayleen Asbo
Wednesday, July 24, 2019
Romanticism, contrary to many popular perceptions, wasn’t simply about diving into the habitat of the heart. Romanticism began as a literary movement that elevated the power of nature as a transcendent force and sought with keen nostalgia to rediscover the wisdom of the past. The Romantics in both l...
Chamber
CHAUSSON CONCERTO SHINES IN A VISIONARY'S SALON
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, July 21, 2019
Ernest Chausson’s four-movement Concerto in D Major for Violin, Piano, and String Quartet (1891) is neither concerto nor sonata nor symphony, but it somehow manages to be all three, especially when played with fire and conviction by an accomplished soloist. Those incendiary and emotional elements w...
Chamber
EUROPEAN SALON MUSIC CAPTIVATES AT VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, July 21, 2019
Two stunning programs of 19th and 20th century chamber music were presented on July 21 and 28 as part of the Valley of the Moon Music Festival at the Hanna Center in Sonoma. Festival founders and directors pianist Eric Zivian and cellist Tanya Tompkins were both on hand to contribute brilliantly at ...
Chamber
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL COMBINATIONS IN VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 20, 2019
A Lovely summer afternoon in Sonoma Valley, an excellent small concert hall, enthusiastic audience, exciting musicians and creative programming with interesting story lines. All these were combined July 20 at a Valley of the Moon Festival concert titled “An Italian in Paris.” This is the fifth seaso...
Opera
'ELIXIR' A WELCOME TONIC IN SPRIGHTLY ANNUAL MMF OPERA
by Terry McNeill
Friday, July 19, 2019
In most of the Mendocino Music Festival’s 33 seasons a single evening is given over to a staged opera, with bare bones sets, lighting, costumes, minimal cast and short length. No Wagner or Verdi here, no multiple acts and complicated production demands. Light and frothy are the usual, and so it wa...
Recital
PUNGENT WALTZES AND VIRTUOSITY IN LADEUR'S SLV RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, July 17, 2019
San Francisco based pianist Jeffrey LaDeur has become one of the most sought-after North Bay virtuosi, and cemented that reputation July 17 in a short but eclectic recital in Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village Chamber Music Series. Before 140 in the Village’s auditorium Mr. LaDeur began with Schubert...
Choral and Vocal
NOBLE BRAHMS REQUIEM PERFORMANCE CLOSES SONOMA BACH'S SEASON
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, June 01, 2019
Sonoma Bach, conducted by Robert Worth, presented a truly grand finale to their 2018-19 "Light Out of Darkness" season in two sold out Schroeder Hall performances June 1 and 2. The program "A Human Requiem" was received rapturously with a well-deserved standing ovation for the main work, Brahms' ...
Chamber
THREE SONG CYCLES HIGHLIGHT VIBRANT SLV RECITAL
by Pamela Hicks-Gailey
Wednesday, May 08, 2019
An ambitious recital of vocal and piano music was presented May 8 at Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village by mezzo-soprano Kindra Scharich and pianist Jeffrey LaDeur. The duo engaged the enthusiastic audience with scholarly friendliness and artistry in performances of Beethoven's short cycle of six song...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Redwood Arts Council / Saturday, November 03, 2018
Atos Trio. Annette Von Hehn. violin; Stefan Heinemeyer, cello; Thomas Hope, piano

ATOS Piano Trio Nov. 3 At the Occidental Performing Arts Center (J. McNeill photo)

ATOS TRIO IN OCCIDENTAL CHAMBER CONCERT

by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 03, 2018

When the Berlin-based ATOS Piano Trio entered the cramped Occidental Performing Arts stage Nov. 3, the audience of 100 anticipated familiar works in the announced all-Russian program. What they got was a selection of rarely-plays trios, with a gamut of emotions.

Then one-movement Rachmaninoff G Minor Trio, Op. Post, opened the music and the Trio caught the surging Romantic themes, first warmly set out by cellist Stefan Heinemeyer. Attacks were clean throughout, though the sub-professional stage piano contributed to fast but blurred scale playing from pianist Thomas Hoppe.

Mr. Hoppe’s strong playing continued into a performance of Arensky’s D Minor Trio, Op. 32, and a work that has been a personal favorite since a Pennario-Heifetz-Piatigorsky concert long ago in Los Angeles. Subsequently the Borodin Trio’s recording set the standard, and our local Trio Navarro has specialized in the Arensky 1st. The opening theme had great nobility, with a gentle throbbing richness from violinist Annette von Hehn. Ms. Von Hehn took the repeat of the opening theme at reduced volume and with a delicate ritard, exactly the thing to do in this music, but during the evening she often didn’t take notes squarely and occasional pitch variation popped up. High register string sound was admirable in both the cello and violin.

The scherzo was played at a brisk tempo but in Mr. Hoppe’s speedy scales individual notes were lost. The interjecting “palm court” theme had a charming waltz character, and admirable spiccato bow from cello and violin.

Mr. Heinemeyer broadened his already broad vibrato in the elegia’s opening theme, swelling beautifully on individual notes and showed deft control of pianissimo. In the finale the string unison pizzicato was perfection, and the entire movement’s playing was muscular and convincing.

Beginning the second half were three folks dances, Op. 13b, by the Russian Alexander Weprik. They passed quickly but not without notice, especially the first and third with bottom register cello support and often raucous and blaring peasant rhythms. The lyrical second waltz had a banal theme that wound in and out of all three instruments, but was alluring and ended in a whisper. An effective work.

Shostakovich’s Trio No. 2 in E Minor, Op. 67, begins in an eerie upper register string murmur, and is difficult to accurately mesh the instruments, with the violin and cello lines far apart and strange harmonies all about. The main theme was played with a ringing sound, and the ending of the andante – moderato had a sarcastic character in even string tempo. An authoritative reading.

Playing in the scherzo was slashing and intense, with contrasting staccato phrases that morphed to light gaiety and thumping chords and swirls of sound. Mr. Hoppe’s opening chords in the largo were played with the shift pedal and the sad lament was in a way just as intense as the music of the scherzo. There were many powerful but simple chords, six seconds apart, that were unique and masterfully played.

A cascade of anguished sonority was heard in the finale allegretto, a menacing movement leavened by short folk-music phrases and quiet double-stops from Ms. von Hehn. Some parts of the interpretation seemed comedic and even mechanical, but with dark contours. There was little letup in the anxious momentum, and Mr. Hoppe’s strong right-hand tremolos led to a subdued conclusion.

There was no encore offered, and applause was muted, presumably due not to the level of performance but to such disturbing music.