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Recital
PERLMAN TRIUMPHS IN LOW TEMPERATURE SOLD OUT WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, September 15, 2019
Itzhak Perlman did a rare thing for a classical musician in his Sept. 15 recital – he sold out Weill Hall’s 1,400 seats, with 50 more on stage. Clearly the violinist has an adoring local audience that came to hear him perform with pianist Rohan De Silva in a concert of two substantial sonatas mixed...
Recital
TRANSCRIPTIONS ABOUND IN GALBRAITH'S GUITAR RECITAL
by Gary Digman
Saturday, September 14, 2019
Master guitarist Paul Galbraith’s artistry was much in evidence Sept. 14 in his Sebastopol Community Church recital. Attendees in the Redwood Arts Council events were initially bothered by the afternoon’s heat in the church, but it was of small importance when the Cambridge, England-based artist be...
Recital
ECLECTIC DRAMATIC PROGRAMING IN SPRING LAKE VILLAGE RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Marin-based pianist Laura Magnani combined piquant remarks to an audience of 100 Sept. 11 with dramatic music making in a recital at Spring Lake Village’s Montgomery Center. Ms. Magnani’s eclectic programming in past SLV recitals continued, beginning with three sonatas by her Italian compatriot Sca...
Chamber
PERFORMER AS PROMOTER: CLARA SCHUMANN AND MUSICAL SALONS CLOSE VOM FESTIVAL
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, July 28, 2019
The July 28 closing performance of the Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival could have been subtitled "Friends", as it was devoted to works by both Clara and Robert Schumann, and those of their friends and protégés Brahms and virtuoso violinist Joseph Joachim, with whom Clara toured extensively...
Chamber
ROMANTIC CHAMBER WORKS HIGHLIGHT VOM FESTIVAL AT HANNA CENTER
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 27, 2019
Now in its 5th season the Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Festival presented July 27 a concert titled “My Brilliant Sister,” featuring Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel’s compositions for combinations of voice, fortepiano and strings. Fanny and her brother Felix were close, and Felix occasionally published ...
Symphony
ROMANTIC DREAMS AT THE MENDOCINO MUSIC FESTIVAL
by Kayleen Asbo
Wednesday, July 24, 2019
Romanticism, contrary to many popular perceptions, wasn’t simply about diving into the habitat of the heart. Romanticism began as a literary movement that elevated the power of nature as a transcendent force and sought with keen nostalgia to rediscover the wisdom of the past. The Romantics in both l...
Chamber
CHAUSSON CONCERTO SHINES IN A VISIONARY'S SALON
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, July 21, 2019
Ernest Chausson’s four-movement Concerto in D Major for Violin, Piano, and String Quartet (1891) is neither concerto nor sonata nor symphony, but it somehow manages to be all three, especially when played with fire and conviction by an accomplished soloist. Those incendiary and emotional elements w...
Chamber
EUROPEAN SALON MUSIC CAPTIVATES AT VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, July 21, 2019
Two stunning programs of 19th and 20th century chamber music were presented on July 21 and 28 as part of the Valley of the Moon Music Festival at the Hanna Center in Sonoma. Festival founders and directors pianist Eric Zivian and cellist Tanya Tompkins were both on hand to contribute brilliantly at ...
Chamber
ECLECTIC INSTRUMENTAL COMBINATIONS IN VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, July 20, 2019
A Lovely summer afternoon in Sonoma Valley, an excellent small concert hall, enthusiastic audience, exciting musicians and creative programming with interesting story lines. All these were combined July 20 at a Valley of the Moon Festival concert titled “An Italian in Paris.” This is the fifth seaso...
Opera
'ELIXIR' A WELCOME TONIC IN SPRIGHTLY ANNUAL MMF OPERA
by Terry McNeill
Friday, July 19, 2019
In most of the Mendocino Music Festival’s 33 seasons a single evening is given over to a staged opera, with bare bones sets, lighting, costumes, minimal cast and short length. No Wagner or Verdi here, no multiple acts and complicated production demands. Light and frothy are the usual, and so it wa...
RECITAL REVIEW
Cinnabar Theater / Sunday, February 17, 2019
Daniel Glover, pianist

Daniel Glover Acknowledging Applause Feb. 17 at Cinnabar

GLOVER'S ECLECTIC PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHT'S CINNABAR RECITAL

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 17, 2019

Daniel Glover is arguably the busiest virtuoso pianist in the San Francisco Bay area, but rarely is heard in North Bay concerts. So 90 local pianophiles were anxious to hear him Feb. 17 in Petaluma’s charming small Cinnabar Theater, and they were rewarded with an eclectic program of sometimes unfamiliar but always intriguing music.

At the outset it’s important to know that Mr. Glover does not structure his recitals in the usual format, and he loves to provide extended remarks prior to each piece. At times the commentary was wayward and arcane, but it was always laced with humor and sporadically with novel insights to the music. The pianist is a musical crusader, and tonight was often irrepressible with his stage energy carrying over to most of the music on the program

The evening’s pièce de résistance was Liszt’s seminal B Minor Sonata, and Mr. Glover’s interpretation of the masterful work from 1853 was at turns energetic, quietly lyrical and demonic. Liszt scholar Alan Walker feels the Sonata needs to clock in just under 30 minutes, and Mr. Glover’s performance was a fast 28, but it’s even possible to stretch the Sonata to 31 minutes (Garrick Ohlsson’s reading) by spending time sniffing the lovely flowers amongst the sonic thunder. In this recital the artist certainly wanted to project the work as high drama, attacking the under gunned house instrument with rapid-fire scale passages, repeated fortissimo chords and paying scant attention to extended rubatos and languorous parts. In the recitativo and andante sostenuto sections he played with an engaging poetry, letting in some air to the drama that was otherwise mostly absent.

Surprisingly the allegro energicofugue was played at a judicious tempo, and the interpretation grew in intensity towards the presto sections where running octaves in both hands demanded both speed and clarity. Mr. Glover’s octaves never failed him, and he left nothing on the table, and his copious wrong notes seemed only to establish that this performance was one fashioned with musical animation, potent motive projection and conviction.

Liszt’s six Consolations, from the same period as the Sonata, were played with the short E Major’s chordal legato seamlessly moving to No. 2 in the same key. The well-known D-Flat Consolation had the right-hand melody played slower than usual, but without much rhythmic subtlety at the end of phrases or attention paid to the mysterious dissonant chord five bars before the pianissimo end. Arpeggio playing in the D-Flat adagio was lovely, and the final E Major allegretto cantabile was subtlety poetic and at a brisk clip.

What could follow such provocative Liszt after intermission? Mr. Glover is often a man of repertoire surprises, and three works by Beryl Rubinstein were fascinating pianism with a French flavor, reminiscent of Poulenc, Chaminade and even bits of Chabrier. The toccata-like Arabesque was played with repeated echo notes in the right hand, followed by the mildly dissonant nocturne’s impressionism with phrases in slow modulations, and the big contrasts in the concluding caprice at a presto pace where the pianist managed clarity in difficult close hand positions. It’s a marvelous suite of beguiling pieces, and clearly congenial to the pianist.

Four Gershwin Preludes from 1934 were next, each with Broadway melodies tinged with jazz syncopations. Highlights for me were the heat-of-the-night wet sound (right out of “Porgy and Bess”) with ostinato accompaniment in the andante con moto e poco rubato and the brilliantly played rhythms of the allegro ben ritmato e desiso. Beryl Rubinstein’s transcription of “Bess You Is My Woman” from Gershwin’s 1935 Opera “Porgy and Bess” followed, and here the pianist opted for some unique inner voices in the intricate contrapuntalism. It was a wonderful evocation of Gershwin’s singular genius.

Concluding the all-American composer second half was Gottschalk’s sparking F-Sharp Major “Banjo,” Op. 15, written at the same time as the Liszt Sonata but worlds apart in style and effect. The artist frequently mimicked the twang and pluck of the string banjo in repeated figurations, and his acrobatic skips in both hands were impressive along with inspired presentation of the captivating themes and pianistic sonority.

Of course it brought the house down, and Mr. Glover responded with additional Gershwin Broadway Show pieces, “The Man I Love” (from Lady Be Good) and “I Got Rhythm” (from Girl Crazy). Both were excitable performances, each with a nod to pianist Earl Wild, in the vein of musical theatricality that characterized a splendid recital.