Home  Reviews  Articles  Calendar  Presenters  Add Event     
Chamber
CLARA SCHUMANN TRIO COMMANDS VOM CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT AT HANNA
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, July 24, 2021
The Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Series has begun several virtual and a few live concerts in its new seventh season, some broadcast from Sonoma’s Hanna Center Hall and some in posh local venues. July 24’s video had a small live audience and a well-produced video program of three works. Titled “
Chamber
EXEMPLARY QUARTET PLAYING IN MENDO FESTIVAL FT. BRAGG CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, July 21, 2021
Faced with the impossibility of presenting concerts in the iconic large white tent on the bluff, the Mendocino Music Festival opted to use Ft. Bragg’s Cotton Auditorium for ten events in the abbreviated 35th season. San Francisco’s Alexander String Quartet played July 21 to a fully masked audience
Chamber
ECLECTIC PROGRAMMING AT PIANOSONOMA CONCERT IN SCHROEDER HALL
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Tuesday, July 20, 2021
After a dark year bereft of live performance, pianoSonoma launched July 20 the first Vino & Vibrato concert of the 2021 season in Sonoma State's Schroeder Hall, albeit sadly senza vino due to Covid protocols. Three exceptional musicians showered the audience with an interesting variety of pia
Chamber
RARELY-PLAYED SCHUMANN HIGHLIGHTS HEALDSBURG RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, July 10, 2021
Brave New Music sporadically produces concerts in and around Healdsburg, and July 10’s violin recital in downtown St. Paul’s Church must have been one of the first post-lockdown, post-be-extra-careful classical music concerts in Sonoma County's summer season. New Music Founder Gary McLaughlin with
Chamber
ECHOS ON A WARM SUMMER NIGHT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, July 10, 2021
ECHO Chamber Orchestra’s first concert in a year and a half, “A Musical Promenade,” was a promenade indeed. When patrons arrived at San Anselmo’s First Presbyterian Church for the 6:00 performance July 10, they were funneled through the garden to the Duncan Hall patio, where folding chairs were set
Chamber
LONG DISTANCE LOVE BEGINS VOM SUMMER FESTIVAL
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Thursday, June 24, 2021
The Valley of the Moon Music Festival offered a 7th season preview June 24 with a stunning online concert, aptly named Long Distance Love, featuring inspired performances of Beethoven's short song cycle An die ferne Geliebte,, and selections from Brahms’ beloved Liebeslieder Wal
Recital
ROMERO'S ARTISTRY IN SLV RECITAL PROGRAMMING AND PERFORMANCE
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, June 2, 2021
Gustavo Romero has been an admired visitor to North Bay stages, playing over a decade recitals at Dominican University, the Music at Oakmont concerts and at the Spring Lake Village Concert Series. He returned June 2 to SLV in a virtual recital, videoed from his home concert hall the University of N
RUBICON'S VIRTUAL CONCERT A MALANGE OF CONTRASTS
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 16, 2021
The inaugural concert of a new Mendocino County chamber group is a reason for celebration, and the Rubicon Trio made the most of a mixed musical menu during a May16 virtual concert. Presented by the Ukiah Symphony Orchestra as the last in their “Salons with the Symphony” Series, the Rubicon began w
Recital
PIANO VIRTUOSITY IN YAKUSHEV'S REDWOOD ARTS RECITAL
by Nicki Bell
Sunday, May 16, 2021
Russian pianist Ilya Yakushev’s recital for the Redwood Arts Council was perhaps the local season’s virtual music at the greatest distance, as the filming May 16 came from a church in St. Petersburg. And good filming it was, with multiple camera viewpoints of the church, full and split screens and
Chamber
STYLISH HAYDN QUARTETS CLOSE GREEN ROOM SERIES
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 9, 2021
Completing the Green Music Center’s spring series series of “Green Room” virtual concerts, the St. Lawrence String Quartet played May 9 a lightweight program of two Haydn works. Lightweight perhaps, but in every way satisfying. The G Major Quartet (Op. 76, No.1) began the music that was supplement
CHAMBER REVIEW
California Summer Music / Sunday, July 5, 2009
Faculty Concert

Violist Sheila Browne

SSU WORKSHOP FACULTY SHINES IN UNFAMILIAR WORKS

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, July 5, 2009

California Summer Music is a musician’s workshop, rotating between college campuses that put young players in small classes with masters of their respective instruments. Sonoma State University is hosting the 2009 event for three weeks in July, and the CSM faculty had a chance July 5 to show the troops how strings and a piano can sing, albeit with non-traditional compositions.

Before 125 avid listeners in the Fred Warren Auditorium, string and piano performers played a concert consisting of mostly unfamiliar music, and discovery was afoot. Beginning with the Theme and Variations movement from Mozart’s E Flat Divertimento (K. 563), violinist Wendy Sharp and violist Scott Woolweaver were joined by cellist Richard Andaya in launching an inventive set of four variations that never strayed far from the richly-hued theme. Written in 1788, the work is Mozart’s only published string trio. Ms. Sharp’s violin had considerable power, juxtaposing the stately and processional cello line.

Lili Boulanger’s “Nocturne and Cortege” followed, a short seven-page work written in 1914 and, given the title, played in a surprisingly festive mood. Violinist Robin Sharp and pianist Lori Lack gave the piece, perhaps the most performed of the Boulanger works, a lilting reading, the violin pitch dead on and the piano line continually supportive.

The first half closed with two intriguing pieces, both wonderfully played. University of Tennessee composer Kenneth Jacobs wrote his Concerto for Viola, “Approaching Northern Darkness,” for Sheila Browne, and here she played just the final movement from the long 47-minute work premiered in 2005. But it was a substantial chunk, titled “Bold Declaration,” and exhibited a pulsating power and rhythmic drive throughout. This is a big movement, and Browne mastered the multiple double stops and eerie top register of her instrument with aplomb, as did pianist Julie Nishimura. The long romantic line was sustained, the lower-register viola segments contrasting with the piano’s syncopated rhythms. Browne has just recorded the entire concerto on a Zyode CD.

Following the Jacobs was daunting, and some frolic was in order, provided exuberantly by violinist Wendy Sharp and pianist Nishimura in Paul Schoenfeld’s “Four Souvenirs.” Schoenfeld’s 12-minute work cobbles together music depicting a samba, tango, Tin Pan Alley tunes and a rollicking square dance. His sensuous tango was especially effective, the tune from “Autumn Leaves” poking out and leading to the jazziest of the set, the fast square dance. Little bursts of sforzandos, played stylishly by Nishimura, were a relief of sorts from the 1920s swing melody of the Tin Pan Alley movement. The music is intricate and was deftly played, the audience seeming charmed.

Following intermission, cellist Irene Sharp, accompanied by Nishmura, played Poulenc’s 1948 Cello Sonata. The opening Allegro tempo di Marcia got off to a rocky start as Sharp had severe pitch problems, particularly in fast passages where she couldn’t find a tonal center, and her portamento was unconvincing and muddy. Things settled down in the calm and lyric Cavatine, played with just the right amount of muted sadness. The pianissimo ending was lovely. A Parisian dance hall mood characterized the Ballabile third movement, the playing finally secure, and leading to the concluding Largo-Presto finale that began with crashing forte chords from the pianist. It’s a sectional movement, pesky to keep together, with some phrases from Sharp sounding at first too tentative and then in sets of repeated chords refined and distinctive. She is an experienced cellist but eschews a virtuoso’s approach.

Virtuoso music closed the program as Santa Clara University pianist Hans Boepple played just the final section, the “Tanatella”, from the Venezia e Napoli supplement to Vol. II of Liszt’s Anées de Pèlerinage. Famous for the technical demands of fast repeated notes and demonic chord passages, the piece frequently appears as an encore at piano recitals but was an odd choice here, given the nature and freshness of the preceding music. Boepple showed good technical command and added many intriguing ritards, allowing discrete voice leadings. Apart from a brief memory lapse and a lack of the last ounce of orchestral brilliance, his playing was effective and drew the evening’s most prolonged applause.

No encores were offered by any of the musicians, appropriate for an event which showcased faculty at the beginning of a rigorous schedule of workshops for youthful musicians.