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OTHER REVIEW
Dallas Brass / Sunday, March 7, 2010
Michael Levine,trombone; Brian Neal, trumpet; D.J. Barraclough, trumpet; Dan Peck, artistic collaborator and tuba; and Jeff Handel, percussionist.



Dallas Brass

BRASS GROUP EXCITING AT WELLS

by Sid Gordon
Sunday, March 7, 2010

In a March 7 concert titled “An American Musical Journey,” The Dallas Brass featured American music from the Revolution to the present day. The program, produced by the Santa Rosa Concert Association in the Wells Fargo Center, was woven together by clever narration and music history provided by Michael Levine, trombonist and director of the group. Mr. Levine was accompanied by Charles Potter (trumpet and alto horn), Stephen Kunzer (tuba), Daniel Rosenbloom (a variety of trumpets from the small Piccolo trumpet to the larger bore flugelhorn) and D. J. Barraclough (trumpet and alto horn). Their mastery of complex tonal varieties and showmanship was outstanding.

The quintet further demonstrated their versatility throughout the concert by using subtle or sometimes exaggerated body movements. One of their most interesting and crowd pleasing presentations was a precision hand clapping, knee slapping , chest pounding , patty-cake routine that included all six musicians, sitting side by side, interacting with each other without missing a beat. It was hard to say who was having the most fun, the Dallas Brass or the audience. The audience responded with roaring applause. This type of band music, reminiscent of the days bands played in parks, was enthusiastically received. The audience joined in singing “America the Beautiful,” and veterans stood as a medley of service songs were played to honor them.

The spectacular finale commemorated Benny Goodman’s 1938 appearance in Carnegie Hall with an extended solo by drummer Jeff Handel showing not only his skill as a jazz musician, but his expertise as a versatile percussionist.