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Recital
HEROIC LIM PERFORMANCE AT STEINWAY SOCIETY RECITAL
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, September 18, 2022
Chamber
SURPRISING IVES TRIO AND SONGS AT VMMF'S HANNA CENTER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, July 24, 2022
Chamber
SEMINAL SCHUBERT CYCLE PERFORMANCE FROM STEGALL-ZIVIAN AT VMMF
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, July 23, 2022
Opera
MARIN'S STRIPPED-DOWN OPERA CHARMS
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, July 17, 2022
Chamber
MOZART AND BRAHMS AN AUSPICIOUS COUPLE AT VMMF FESTIVAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, July 17, 2022
Chamber
CLARINIST HOEPRICH'S VIRTUOSITY IN VMMF OPENING CONCERT
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, July 16, 2022
Recital
AGGRESSIVE PIANISM IN MYER'S MENDO FESTIVAL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, July 14, 2022
Opera
SONOROUS WAGNER GALA AND CAPACITY CROWD AT VALLEJO'S EMPRESS
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, July 9, 2022
Choral and Vocal
TRAVELING CHORISTERS SO CO DEBUT IN TWO BIG CANTATAS
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, June 25, 2022
Opera
VERDI'S THEATRICAL LA TRAVIATA TRIUMPHS AT CINNABAR
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, June 19, 2022
CHAMBER REVIEW

Trio Navarro

TRIO NAVARRO IN FINE FORM

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 25, 2008

It was business as usual for the Trio Navarro on May 25, as they closed their season with a splendid concert for a small audience in Sonoma State's Ives 119 hall.

The Navarro programmed two popular piano trios with a less-familiar Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel work, the Op. 11 Trio in D Minor. As cellist Joy Rachuy Brindel remarked, all three trios were in D minor, and all ended in D Major.

The Mendelssohn-Hensel Trio is a dramatic work, restless and assertive, and full of Mendelssohnian harmonic progressions and chords. The Navarro gave it a good ride, with Brindel's cello leading the way. Plaintive themes abound, and the long piano introduction in the Lied movement led to a mazurka-like dance of rich beauty. As in past concerts in Ives 119, the acoustics below mezzo piano were fine, but when musical volume was demanded, the instrumental tones became harsh and indistinct.

The Op. 120 Trio by Faur' began with urbane and smooth playing. Violinist Roy Malan, in his reserved way, latched onto the languorous theme with elegance. In the Andantino, pianist Marilyn Thompson had the leading role, the movement ending with eerie dissonances and a lovely cello-violin unison duet. The finale, Allegro Vivo, begins without the familiar Faur' arpeggios, but it soon settles down into the French master's idiom. The performance was fluent, warm and evocative.

Robert Schumann's 1847 Trio, Op. 63, closed the program with loads of brooding passion. Ms. Thompson's descending left-hand tremolo figures had just enough 'rumble' to set off the prominent cello line, and the ensemble playing was surely integrated. The Navarro is not a note-perfect group, such as the late lamented Beaux Arts, nor is it three individual virtuosi trying to connect. Instead, it always delivers what the music calls for, and it tackles many unfamiliar works each season, to the benefit of local chamber music lovers. The Navarro clearly enjoys performing its discoveries.