Home  Reviews  Articles  Calendar  Presenters  Add Event     
Symphony
THE SHOW MUST GO ON
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 9, 2022
The Jan. 9 Santa Rosa Symphony concert was supposed to feature the world premiere of Gabriella Smith’s first symphony, but it ended up featuring another type of premiere: a concert that was conceived, rehearsed and performed in less than eight hours. Symphony staff learned on Sunday morning that so
Choral and Vocal
AN OLD FRIEND RETURNS TO WEILL IN STERLING ABS MESSIAH PERFORMANCE
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, December 19, 2021
A tremendous accomplishment by the American Bach Soloists Dec. 19 was near perfect performance of Handel's Messiah in Weill Hall. Long an annual tradition at San Francisco's Grace Cathedral, the ABS took to the road and delivered a Christmas gift of epic proportions to an obviously thrilled and enth
Symphony
SHOSTAKOVICH FIFTH THUNDERS AT WEILL HALL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 5, 2021
In a new season marketed as “Classical Reunion,” the Santa Rosa Symphony made a palpable connection with its audience at the early December set of three standing ovation concerts in Weill Hall. The December 5 concert, with 1,000 attending, is reviewed here. Vaughan Williams’ popular Fantasia on a T
Chamber
THE LINCOLN RETURNS WITH CLARKE'S PUNGENT TRIO
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, November 18, 2021
There were many familiar faces Nov. 18 during Music at Oakmont’s initial concert of the season, but perhaps the most necessary were the three musicians of the Lincoln Piano Trio, the Chicago-based group that has performed often in Oakmont since 2006. A smaller than unusual audience in Berger Audito
Symphony
NOSTALGIC BARBER KNOXVILLE AT SO CO PHIL JACKSON THEATER CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 14, 2021
In their first Jackson Theater appearance of the new season the Sonoma County Philharmonic presented Nov. 14 a program devoid of novelty, but showcasing the “People’s Orchestra” in splendid performance condition after a long COVID-related layoff. Conductor Norman Gamboa drew a committed and boister
Chamber
THRILLING PIANO QUINTETS IN MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 14, 2021
The Mill Valley Chamber Music Society sprang back to life on November 14 when a stellar ensemble from the Manhattan Chamber Players, a New York-based collective, arrived to perform two piano quintets: Vaughn-Williams’ in C Minor (1903), little known and rarely performed; and Schubert’s in A Major D.
Chamber
MUSCULAR BRAHMS FROM IVES COLLECTIVE IN GLASER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 14, 2021
Leaving SRJC’s Newman Auditorium for the first time in decades, the College’s Chamber Concert Series presented a season-opening concert Nov. 14 in Santa Rosa’s Glaser Center with the four-musician Bay-Area based Ives Collective. The season, the first given since 2020, is dedicated to Series Founder
Symphony
MONUMENTAL BRAHMS SYMPHONY HIGHLIGHTS MARIN SYMPHONY RETURN
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 7, 2021
In the waning COVID pandemic the Marin Symphony is one of the last Bay Area orchestras to return to the stage, and they did with considerable fanfare Nov. 7 before 1,200 in Civic Center Auditorium, with resident conductor Alasdair Neale leading a demanding concert of Brahms, Schumann and New York-ba
Symphony
APOLLO'S FIRE LIGHTS UP VIVALDI'S FOUR SEASONS IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, October 30, 2021
Long ago the Canadian violin virtuoso Gil Shaham played a program in Weill Hall of solo Bach, with a visual backdrop of slowly developing visuals, such as a pokey flower opening over four minutes. The Bach was sensational, and some in the audience liked the photos but many found them disconcerting,
Chamber
SPARKLING WIND, STRING, HARP MUSIC AT DEVON HOUSE GARDEN CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, October 9, 2021
Take a mild autumn evening, a garden gazebo with patterned rugs and lit with soft bulbs, shake in a fine chamber ensemble, add a rising new moon, and you have a recipe for the musical delight that violist Elizabeth Prior presented Oct. 9 in her Devon House Garden Concert series. The Marin Terra Li
SYMPHONY REVIEW

Violinist Alexander Barantschick

IN THE PRIME OF YOUTH

by Steve Osborn
Thursday, January 23, 2014

Youth was the order of the day at the San Francisco Symphony's Jan. 23 concert in Weill Hall. Three of the four pieces on the program were written by teenaged composers--Mozart, Mendelssohn, Britten--and the fourth, by Piazzolla, included a youthful tango.

On the other hand, most of the musicians were middle-aged. There were only two dozen or so, a remarkably diminished version of an ensemble that had numbered well over 100 in its last appearance at Weill Hall, to play Richard Strauss's mammoth "Alpine Symphony." This time the orchestra was restricted to 14 violins, three violas, four cellos and two basses. Later they added a bandoneón player, a pianist and a drummer.

It was somewhat incongruous to see the drum set looming behind the orchestra in the opening work, Mozart's Divertimento in F major, K. 138, written when he was 16. Instead of the drums, the rhythm was supplied by the violas and cellos, who subsisted on a steady diet of eighth notes beneath the violins' soaring melodies. The putative conductor was Concertmaster Alexander Barantschik, but he did little more than lift his bow and occasionally nod at the cellos and basses from his first-chair position.

No conductor was needed in any event. The musicians played as one, with a remarkable unanimity of timbre, tempo and dynamics. The result was youth incarnate: Mozart shining forth in all the glory of his genius. Of the three movements, the second was the most memorable. Its beatific melody evoked Alpine clouds floating over Mozart's native Salzburg, their motion assisted by superb dynamics and evocative playing.

The milieu for the next piece shifted to the Mendelssohn family's sumptuous parlor in Berlin, where young Felix regularly trotted out new compositions for the assembled guests. This one was a violin concerto composed when he was 13, definitely not to be confused with his later masterful effort in the genre.

Standing up from his chair, Barantschik faced the audience, with the orchestra at his back. Playing from score, he never once turned around to conduct, relying once again on the musicians' collective unconscious. In comparison to the youthful Mozart, the youthful Mendelssohn is mostly superficial, given to glittering runs and crowd-pleasing cadenzas. The concerto, which had been forgotten for more than a century before being revived by Yehudi Menuhin, is pleasant but insubstantial.

Like the concerto, Barantschik's playing dwelled on the surface, without too much emotional investment. He has an almost flawless technique and uses minimal body motion, much like his fellow Russian predecessor Jascha Heifetz, one of whose violins he plays. The only oddity is that he grips his bow well up the stick, almost in Baroque position, avoiding his frog like the plague.

The lush sound of orchestra and soloist was remarkably consistent throughout the concerto, even during the slow second movement, which was disrupted by a medical emergency at the back of the hall. Undeterred, Barantschik played without pause, plunging into the gypsy-inspired final movement with alacrity. The long cadenza at the end was a perpetuum mobile that elicited loud applause.

Although Benjamin Britten completed his "Simple Symphony" when he was 20, the four movements are all based on pieces he wrote from the ages of 10 to 13. He is much closer to Mozart than Mendelssohn, opting for heartfelt simplicity rather than superficial complexity. The second movement, "Playful Pizzicato," is especially charming, from the resonant bass plucking to the sudden intrusion of folksong-like strumming. Again, the conductorless orchestra played with remarkable coherence, with everyone on the same dynamic and beat.

Youth succumbed to old age in the final piece(s), the "Melodia" and "Libertango" of Astor Piazzolla, adapted for string orchestra, solo violin and bandoneón by Jeremy Cohen, who also wrote a violin cadenza linking the two. Barantschik again took the solo role, joined by bandoneón player Seth Arsanow.

For those unfamiliar with the bandoneón, it resembles an accordion, with a bellows in the middle and keys on either end--but the bandoneón bellows are much longer than an accordion's and are draped across the player's knee like a massive snake. Their undulating movement becomes as much a part of the performance as the sound they produce.

Arsarnow played his instrument superbly, creating heart-breaking sounds that echoed throughout the hall. The opening "Melodia" was pure romance, a welter of emotions in a melancholy frame. After the transitional violin cadenza, Arsarnow started the concluding youthful tango by tapping the bandoneón with his right hand. The drums entered, and soon the entire orchestra was figuratively prancing across the stage to the tango's distinctive rhythm. The crowd loved it, leaping to their feet at the end.