Home  Reviews  Articles  Calendar  Presenters  Add Event     
Chamber
TURINA PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS SSU FACULTY CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 29, 2023
Chamber
ROMANTIC FERVOR IN FRISSON ENSEMBLE'S RAC CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 22, 2023
Symphony
RACH-ING OUT: SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY EXPLORES HOLLYWOOD’S LOVE AFFAIR WITH RACHMANINOFF
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 22, 2023
Choral and Vocal
ORGAN-CHOIR COMBO IN BACH CELEBRATION
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, January 21, 2023
Recital
FRENCH FLAVOR IN RARE FOUR-HAND RECITAL
by Judy Walker
Sunday, January 15, 2023
Choral and Vocal
POTENT HANDEL ORATORIO IN ABS' WEILL HALL HOLIDAY CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 18, 2022
Choral and Vocal
HALLELUJAH! MARIN ORATORIO IN HOLIDAY SPLENDOR CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, December 17, 2022
Choral and Vocal
SILVER ANNIVERSARY BACH RECITAL AT INCARNATION'S EVENSONG SERVICE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 4, 2022
Symphony
JOY, LOVELY DIVINE SPARK!
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, December 4, 2022
Other
DINOVA PIANISM CHARMS SATED AUDIENCE AT J-B MARIN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 20, 2022
CHAMBER REVIEW

Trio Navarro

ACOUSTIC CLARITY AT LAST

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, August 24, 2014

After years of chamber music frustration in Sonoma State University's Ives and Weill halls, the Trio Navarro basked in acoustical clarity Aug. 24 at their debut concert in the university's new Schroeder Hall.

The acoustics in Weill before small audiences, and with lush romantic chamber music, made blurred legato piano lines the norm. In Sunday's performance of Taneyev's D Major Trio, Op. 22, all was heard clearly. Pianist Marilyn Thompson joined cellist Jill Brindel and violinist Victor Romasevich in a rewarding performance of this rarely played Russian work from 1908.

The Taneyev is not easily grasped, as it lacks the thematic unity of more popular piano trios. However, the Navarro gave it a passionate reading with emphasis on the long vocal lines and warm colors. Mr. Romasevich gave his usual intense sound to the elegant theme and variations, and the constantly surging phrases led to an exciting short and fast opening movement cadenza.

Rich music for the cello characterized the Andante. Ms. Brindel played with refinement in rubato and supplied tasteful small decrescendos. Another violin cadenza led directly to the finale where there were hints of Arensky's second piano trio from 1905.

Even in a lyrical section, Taneyev can't keep his romanticism under wraps for long, and the Navarro built potent climaxes in the concluding Allegro. Mr. Romasevich's penetrating top-end tone easily cut through the dense counterpoint and led the Trio through manifold deceptive cadences.

I find the D Major Trio difficult to get my arms around, but the fervor of Navarro's playing made a case for more familiarity.