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Chamber
TURINA PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS SSU FACULTY CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 29, 2023
Chamber
ROMANTIC FERVOR IN FRISSON ENSEMBLE'S RAC CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 22, 2023
Symphony
RACH-ING OUT: SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY EXPLORES HOLLYWOOD’S LOVE AFFAIR WITH RACHMANINOFF
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 22, 2023
Choral and Vocal
ORGAN-CHOIR COMBO IN BACH CELEBRATION
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, January 21, 2023
Recital
FRENCH FLAVOR IN RARE FOUR-HAND RECITAL
by Judy Walker
Sunday, January 15, 2023
Choral and Vocal
POTENT HANDEL ORATORIO IN ABS' WEILL HALL HOLIDAY CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 18, 2022
Choral and Vocal
HALLELUJAH! MARIN ORATORIO IN HOLIDAY SPLENDOR CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, December 17, 2022
Choral and Vocal
SILVER ANNIVERSARY BACH RECITAL AT INCARNATION'S EVENSONG SERVICE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 4, 2022
Symphony
JOY, LOVELY DIVINE SPARK!
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, December 4, 2022
Other
DINOVA PIANISM CHARMS SATED AUDIENCE AT J-B MARIN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 20, 2022
REVIEW

MTA RECITAL IS FAR FROM PARIS

by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 18, 2009

Sonoma County has a long and cordial history of music in private homes, the most prominent examples being the many events in Corrick and Norma Brown’s living room, and the monthly jazz concerts in Ernie Shelton’s Sebastopol home. Now the local chapter of the Music Teacher’s Association of California has inaugurated a fund-raising house concert series, which launched on Jan. 18 in a recital by pianist Peggy Nance in a Santa Rosa home.

Nance, a specialist in French music, programmed three composers far from Paris – Bartok, Dohnanyi and Janacek. The arrondissement salon gave way to Slavic spice, and the result for an audience of 25 was provocative music making. Coming first were five pieces from the ten-segment “The Overgrown Path” of Janacek, which Nance played “sui generis,” with a misty ambiance and just the right overlay of 19th-century character pieces. Bartok’s often raucous “Fifteen Hungarian Peasant Songs” followed. The work is a connected cycle of short folk tunes, simply harmonized, with several as short as 20 bars. Nance caught all the piquant rhythm and energy of the works, making the quick tempo changes and quirky articulations convincing.

The concert closed with more melodic fare, albeit still Slavic, Dohnanyi’s “Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song,” Op. 29. The simple theme, surrounded by resounding sforzandos and complicated counterpoint, confirmed that Dohnanyi was a significant virtuoso in an era of great pianists. Nance gave each variation far more pedal than the two previous works, demonstrating how well Dohnanyi took parts of Brahms and crafted his individual and romantic voice.