Home  Reviews  Articles  Calendar  Presenters  Add Event     
Chamber
SPARKLING WIND, STRING, HARP MUSIC AT DEVON HOUSE GARDEN CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, October 9, 2021
Take a mild autumn evening, a garden gazebo with patterned rugs and lit with soft bulbs, shake in a fine chamber ensemble, add a rising new moon, and you have a recipe for the musical delight that violist Elizabeth Prior presented Oct. 9 in her Devon House Garden Concert series. The Marin Terra Li
Recital
AUTHORITATIVE BEETHOVEN SONATA IN KLEIN'S OCCIDENTAL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, October 8, 2021
People attending the first Redwood Arts Council Occidental concert in 20 months found a surprise – a luxurious new lobby attached to the Performing Arts Center. It was a welcome bonus to a recital given by pianist Andreas Klein where the music seemed almost as familiar as was the long shuttered hal
Symphony
MOVIE MUSIC ON THE WINDSOR GREEN IN SO CO PHIL SEASON OPENER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 3, 2021
People approaching the Windsor Green bandstand Oct. 3 for the Sonoma County Philharmonic’s season opening concert had some cause for concern. After 18 months of silence would the all-volunteer orchestra have enough musicians for a big movie music program? After all, performers can move, retire, or
Symphony
SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY RETURNS IN TRIUMPH
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, October 3, 2021
It is often the case that a single piece or performer steals the show at a symphony concert, but at the Oct. 3 performance of the Santa Rosa Symphony, the show itself stole the show. The concert opened with a serene 1982 tone poem by Libby Larsen, followed by a masterful performance by soloist Julia
Symphony
TWO WIND SOLOISTS CHARM AT SSU ORCHESTRA CONCERT IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, September 26, 2021
The house of music has many rooms. That dusty adage was never truer than when Weill Hall Sept. 25 hosted a roaring New Orleans-style musical party, and less than a day later a mostly sedate Sonoma State University student orchestra performance. Before a crowd of 200 conductor Alexander Kahn led a
Other
CLEARY'S NEW ORLEANS BAND IGNITES PARTY FOR THE GREEN AT SSU
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, September 25, 2021
A dramatic and unique start to the new Green Music’s Center’ 2021-2022 season exploded in a “Party for the Green” Sept. 25, a New Orleans (NO) style commotion featuring Jon Cleary and his Absolute Monster Gentlemen band, inside and outside of Weill Hall. Beginning with a private gourmet dinner in t
GAULIST FLAVOR IN FINAL SF PIANO FESTIVAL CONCERT AT OLD FIRST
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, August 29, 2021
Final summer music festival programs are often a mix of what has come before, with the theme and even a featured composer taking a last stage appearance, with a dramatic wrap up composition. San Francisco’s International Piano Festival defied the norm August 29 with an eclectic French-flavored prog
SPARE DUO PRECEDES MYSTEROUS DUO AT DEN BOER RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, August 27, 2021
In a departure from usual summer festival fare Julia Den Boer played an August 27 virtual recital in the San Francisco Piano Festival’s 4.5 season with four works, all mostly quiet but all in separate ways insistently demanding of artist and listener. Throughout the 40 minutes there was nary a powe
HARMONIC COMPLEXITY IN PHILLIPS' ALL-GRIFFES RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, August 20, 2021
Charles Griffes’ piano music is similar to that of Busoni, Reger and even Poulenc, in that there is a sporadic flourish of interest with concerts and scholarly work, then a quick fade into another long period of obscurity. So, it was a delight to have an all-Griffes recital August 20 on the San F
Chamber
ONE PIANO, TWO PIANO, THREE PIANO, FORE
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, July 29, 2021
Schroeder Hall was nearly full July 29 for the final pianoSonoma concert of their season, and presumably the draw and highlight for many of the 150 attending was Bach’s Concerto for Four Pianos. And that performance was probably going to be a North Bay premiere. However, it wasn’t the highl
RECITAL REVIEW
Redwood Arts Council / Friday, October 8, 2021
Andreas Klein, piano

Andreas Klein in Occidental

AUTHORITATIVE BEETHOVEN SONATA IN KLEIN'S OCCIDENTAL RECITAL

by Terry McNeill
Friday, October 8, 2021

People attending the first Redwood Arts Council Occidental concert in 20 months found a surprise – a luxurious new lobby attached to the Performing Arts Center. It was a welcome bonus to a recital given by pianist Andreas Klein where the music seemed almost as familiar as was the long shuttered hall and adjacent art gallery. A happy return for all.

Sixty people heard the Germany-based artist give Bach’s Partita No. 2 a balanced reading, the articulation in the two-voiced Allemande clear and the Sarabande echoing some of the harmonies of the long opening Sinfonia. The concluding Capriccio was played quite fast “a la Argerich” and was on the edge of getting out of control, but never did. He took the big repeat and here the contrapuntal playing was the best in the work.

In his remarks to the audience the pianist spoke of his affection for Beethoven’s A Flat Sonata, Op. 110, and the composer’s tribulations during the early 1820s period. The first left-hand tremolos heralded a lyrical cantabile approach to this seminal piece, with a no pause coming before the Scherzo’s three fast runs and good control of the pesky right-hand figurations. Speed continued even into the short (Adagio) introduction to the glorious fugue, where Mr. Klein underscored the contrasts of the building drama with sporadic quiet phrases. Many fugues are not especially happy, but this one has joyous grandeur that the artist conveyed with authority right to the final descending and ascending forte runs. It was the recital’s highlight.

Following intermission, a raffle and announcements by RAC Music Director Sonia Tubridy, Mr. Klein turned to one of Chopin’s most performed works, the G Minor Ballade. The playing had a modern cast with little attention to drawn-out ritards, repeated sections and even single notes played differently, and little emphasis on the romantic themes seemingly written for a great Italian tenor. Octave playing was accurate but again lacked shaping. It was an effective but standard interpretation.

Prokofiev’s B Flat Sonata from 1942 ended the program, and the work is arguably the most popular piano sonata from the last Century. The percussive opening Allegro had some of the evening’s best playing, the stark harmonies lessened by flutter pedaling to effect sonic smudges and contrast. There was just the right amount of repose in the playing, something that continued with the lush Andante caloroso movement where Mr. Klein, using the shift pedal, produced sorrowful colorations in the haunting theme. Prokofiev can often be a romantic composer.

He certainly wasn’t in the famous Precipitato finale, and wanted the performer of this Sonata to play like a machine, with no alteration of speed and intensity. Mr. Klein complied, roaring through the Toccata with controlled abandon up to the three final Fortissimo chords. As always with this outburst of demonic pianistic energy, a loud standing ovation erupted.

No encore was offered. The season continues Nov. 14 at 4 p.m. with the Telegraph Quartet in
Sebastopol’s Community Church, playing music of Festinger, Bacewicz and Britten.