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Recital
MTA BENEFIT CONCERT FEATURES FAURE, DVORAK, JANACEK AND BARBER WORKS
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 11, 2018
In a splendid concert Nov. 11 the Music Teachers Association of California, Sonoma County Chapter, presented their sixth annual benefit concert before 40 avid listeners in the Santa Rosa home of Helen Howard and Robert Yeats. Highlights of the performances, involving eight musicians in various perf...
Recital
SERKIN'S SINGULAR MOZART AND BACH PLAYING IN WEILL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 09, 2018
Returning to Weill Hall following a fire-related recital cancellation in 2017, pianist Peter Serkin programmed just three works in his Nov. 7 concert, three masterworks that challenged both artist and audience alike. It needs to be said at the outset that Mr. Serkin takes a decidedly non-standard a...
Chamber
LUMINOUS FAURE TOPS LINCOLN TRIO'S SPRING LAKE VILLAGE CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, November 07, 2018
Familiarity in chamber music often evokes warm appreciation, and it was thus Nov. 7 when the Chicago-based Lincoln Piano Trio made one of their many Sonoma County appearances, this time on the Spring Lake Village Classical Music Series. Regularly presented by local impresario Robert Hayden, the Lin...
Symphony
PEACE AND LOVE FROM THE SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, November 04, 2018
Before the Santa Rosa Symphony’s Nov. 4 performance of Leonard Bernstein’s “Symphonic Dances from West Side Story,” Symphony CEO Alan Silow took a moment to acknowledge the victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack and to observe that music offers a more peaceful and loving view of the world. Mr. ...
Chamber
ATOS TRIO IN MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 04, 2018
When the ATOS Piano Trio planned their all-Russian touring program at their Berlin home base, it had a strong elegiac, even tragic theme that surely resonated with their Mill Valley Chamber Music Society audience Nov. 4 in Mill Valley. Comprised of Annette von Hehn, violin; Thomas Hoppe, piano; and...
Chamber
ATOS TRIO IN OCCIDENTAL CHAMBER CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 03, 2018
When the Berlin-based ATOS Piano Trio entered the cramped Occidental Performing Arts stage Nov. 3, the audience of 100 anticipated familiar works in the announced all-Russian program. What they got was a selection of rarely-plays trios, with a gamut of emotions. Then one-movement Rachmaninoff G Mi...
Symphony
MIGHTY SHOSTAKOVICH 10TH OPENS MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 28, 2018
Just two works were on the opening program of the Marin Symphony’s 67th season Oct. 28, Tchaikovsky’s iconic D Major Violin Concerto, and Shostakovich’s Tenth Symphony. Before a full house in the Marin Center Auditorium conductor Alasdair Neale set a judicious opening tempo in the brief orchestra i...
Symphony
VIVALDI FOR ALL SEASONS IN WEILL BAROQUE CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, October 27, 2018
The Venice Baroque Orchestra, a dozen superb musicians that include strings, harpsichord and recorder, played an uplifting concert Oct. 27 of mostly Vivaldi sinfonias and concertos. The Weill Hall audience of 600 had rapt attention throughout, and the playing was of the highest musical level. This r...
Recital
LIN'S PIANISM AND PERSONA CHARM SCHROEDER HALL AUDIENCE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 21, 2018
In somewhat of a surprise a sold out Schroeder Hall audience greeted pianist Steven Lin Oct. 21 in his local debut recital. Why a surprise? Because Mr. Lin was pretty much unknown in Northern California, and Schroeder is rarely, very rarely sold out for a single instrumentalist. But no matter, and...
Chamber
HEROIC TRUMPET AND ORGAN MUSIC AT INCARNATION
by Jerry Dibble
Friday, October 12, 2018
The strong connections between Santa Rosa’s musical community and California State University Chico were on display Oct. 12 as David Rothe, Professor Emeritus in the Chico Music Department, and Ayako Nakamura, trumpet with the North State Symphony, presented a concert titled “Heroic Music for Trumpe...
RECITAL REVIEW

Pianist Daria Rabotkina

PIANIST RABOTKINA DEFTLY PLAYS RUSSIANS IN OAKMONT RECITAL

by Terry McNeill
Thursday, October 21, 2010

Oakmont’s monthly Concert Series produces just a few solo piano recitals each year, and they usually feature out-of-the-ordinary repertoire and performers of international caliber. October 21’s recital presenting Daria Rabotkina was no exception to the established norm, the young Russian capably playing three big works to a Berger Auditorium of 175 with consummate ease.

The entire first half was devoted to Prokofiev’s Ten Pieces, Op. 75, taken from the ballet Romeo and Juliet. From 1937, the works are more effective separately than as a group, the melodies direct and uncomplicated. Ms. Rabotkina lavished a lot of time on each, never rushing even in the most popular of the set, Montagues and Capulets. Here the wonderful play of bass chords had a chilling effect, missing when the tempo is too fast. The pianist’s rhythmic security was matched with the many march-like passages and sharp sforzandos. This was Prokofiev playing removed from the drama of the Sonatas, though in the quieter parts (Juliet as a Young Girl and Romeo and Juliet Before Parting) the playing was sensitive and colorful.

Schumann’s popular Kinderscenen, Op. 15, followed intermission and was lovingly played without much individuality, substantially different than the Valentina Lisitsa performance February in Santa Rosa. This was chaste playing with considerable attention to detail, but mostly without inner voices or changes in texture as the 13 parts unfolded. Ms. Rabotkina has a firm control of pace and excellent chordal balancing, the Träumerei and Kind im Einschlummern parts almost soporific in their languorous tempos.

The big work on the program was Rachmaninoff’s B Flat Sonata, in the 1931 version, and it was given a curiously underplayed reading. Curious in the sense that this work, exceptionally popular in competitions for the past 20 years, is almost always a volcano of fortissimo chords, large dynamic contrasts and bring-down-the-house virtuosity. Mr. Rabotkina’s approach, perhaps in conjunction with the instrument’s sound and the hall’s muddied acoustics, was never strident and looked for inner continuity rather than the last once of sonic power. For example, the big chord bass chord just prior to the cascade of notes in the third-movement coda didn’t come with an aural crash, a unique touch for this reporter. This was not note perfect playing but a performance that had emotional intensity without being relentless.

The lovely Rachmaninoff Vocalise from the songs of Op. 34, and composed in 1912, concluded the program in a nostalgic mood, the rich harmonies and subtle pianistic rubato savored by the attentive crowd. The arranger for this solo piano version was unidentified.

One encore was given, a rollicking performance of Chopin’s Opus Posthumous Waltz in E Minor.