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Symphony
SO CO PHIL BON VOYAGE CONCERT AN ODYSSEY OF CONTRASTING SOUND
by Terry McNeill
Friday, June 15, 2018
In a splashy bon voyage concert June 15 the Sonoma County Philharmonic Orchestra launched its June 17-25 Costa Rica tour, performing gratis in Santa Rosaís Jackson Theater the repertoire for tour concerts in San Josť, Costa Ricaís capital, and in surrounding towns. Conductor Norman Gamboa pr...
Chamber
COMMANDING CHOPIN AND DEBUSSY IN SLV RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, June 06, 2018
Concerts at the classy Spring Lake Village Retirement Home in Santa Rosa have admission limited to residents and a few guests, but the chance to hear a first cabin North Bay pianist June 6 brought a Classical Sonoma reviewer into the audience of 100. The crowd numbers were unusually low due to a ba...
Recital
MUSICAL ALCHEMY INSIDE A HIDDEN GEM
by Kayleen Asbo
Friday, May 25, 2018
The Petaluma Historical Library and Museum is a hidden gem of Sonoma County, a gracious†building†that is one of Sonoma Countyís loveliest venues for chamber music concerts, with a fine period piano particularly suited to Romantic music.† Of the surprisingly large array of festivities there, one of t...
Chamber
FINAL VOM MUSICIANS CONCERT IN SCHROEDER A SCHUBERT DELIGHT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, May 12, 2018
It's rare to have the opportunity to compare in a short period two performances of the same major Schubert work, in this case the great B Flat Piano Trio, D. 898. The chance came May 12 when the Valley of the Moon Festival musicians played it in Schroeder, just over a month since the Hallís residen...
Symphony
FERRANDIS BIDS ADIEU WITH MAHLERíS FINAL SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 06, 2018
Sonoma State students in graduation robes posed for pictures and hugged each other at the universityís stone gates on Sunday afternoon, mirroring the prolonged farewells within the universityís Green Music Center, where Bruno Ferrandis bid adieu to the Santa Rosa Symphony after a dozen years at the ...
Symphony
SONIC SPLENDOR AT MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Abby Wasserman
Tuesday, May 01, 2018
The Marin Symphony Orchestra ended the current season with a flourish, interpreting big and small works by Richard Strauss and Stravinsky. Strauss and Stravinsky were contemporaries for 40 years, but inhabited different worlds. Both composers were affected by cataclysmic changes and war, and musical...
Symphony
ORGAN SYMPHONY IN SSU ORCHESTRA CONCERT IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 29, 2018
Though Classical Sonoma seldom reviews student concerts, as ample North Coast concerts keep the staff of 11 reviewers busy. But the chance to hear the Sonoma State University Orchestra tackle St. SaŽnsí majestic Organ Symphony April 29 was a rare opportunity and not easily to be missed. Avec lí...
Recital
HEAVENLY SCHUBERT AND DEMONIC CHOPIN
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, April 21, 2018
One of the anomalies in the long ago ďGolden EraĒ of romantic pianism (about 1905 to 1940) is that the virtuoso giants of the time didnít play Schubert. It took the German pianist Artur Schnabel to bring the beauties of Schuberís work to the publicís attention, and now they seem to be on almost ever...
Symphony
SPLENDID JUPITER AND ZOOMING CONCERTO AT VALLEJO SYMPHONY SEASON FINALE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 15, 2018
Over the past two years the Vallejo Symphony has made big changes, moving from a stark middle school auditorium to the snazzy remodeled 1911-era downtown Empress Theater, and engaging Marc Taddei as its seventh conductor. April 15 was the seasonís final concert of the 86th season. In a programmin...
Chamber
VIRTUOSO CELLO AND GUITAR TRANSCRIPTIONS AT RAC SEBASTOPOL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, April 14, 2018
Listeners and yes even music critics usually prepare for a concert with research, checking recorded performances, looking at artist biographies and even reviewing sheet music. This was a difficult task for the April 14 Redwood Arts Council concert in Sebastopolís Community Church, as the performers...
RECITAL REVIEW

Pianist Daria Rabotkina

PIANIST RABOTKINA DEFTLY PLAYS RUSSIANS IN OAKMONT RECITAL

by Terry McNeill
Thursday, October 21, 2010

Oakmontís monthly Concert Series produces just a few solo piano recitals each year, and they usually feature out-of-the-ordinary repertoire and performers of international caliber. October 21ís recital presenting Daria Rabotkina was no exception to the established norm, the young Russian capably playing three big works to a Berger Auditorium of 175 with consummate ease.

The entire first half was devoted to Prokofievís Ten Pieces, Op. 75, taken from the ballet Romeo and Juliet. From 1937, the works are more effective separately than as a group, the melodies direct and uncomplicated. Ms. Rabotkina lavished a lot of time on each, never rushing even in the most popular of the set, Montagues and Capulets. Here the wonderful play of bass chords had a chilling effect, missing when the tempo is too fast. The pianistís rhythmic security was matched with the many march-like passages and sharp sforzandos. This was Prokofiev playing removed from the drama of the Sonatas, though in the quieter parts (Juliet as a Young Girl and Romeo and Juliet Before Parting) the playing was sensitive and colorful.

Schumannís popular Kinderscenen, Op. 15, followed intermission and was lovingly played without much individuality, substantially different than the Valentina Lisitsa performance February in Santa Rosa. This was chaste playing with considerable attention to detail, but mostly without inner voices or changes in texture as the 13 parts unfolded. Ms. Rabotkina has a firm control of pace and excellent chordal balancing, the Tršumerei and Kind im Einschlummern parts almost soporific in their languorous tempos.

The big work on the program was Rachmaninoffís B Flat Sonata, in the 1931 version, and it was given a curiously underplayed reading. Curious in the sense that this work, exceptionally popular in competitions for the past 20 years, is almost always a volcano of fortissimo chords, large dynamic contrasts and bring-down-the-house virtuosity. Mr. Rabotkinaís approach, perhaps in conjunction with the instrumentís sound and the hallís muddied acoustics, was never strident and looked for inner continuity rather than the last once of sonic power. For example, the big chord bass chord just prior to the cascade of notes in the third-movement coda didnít come with an aural crash, a unique touch for this reporter. This was not note perfect playing but a performance that had emotional intensity without being relentless.

The lovely Rachmaninoff Vocalise from the songs of Op. 34, and composed in 1912, concluded the program in a nostalgic mood, the rich harmonies and subtle pianistic rubato savored by the attentive crowd. The arranger for this solo piano version was unidentified.

One encore was given, a rollicking performance of Chopinís Opus Posthumous Waltz in E Minor.