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Chamber
ECLECTIC REPERTOIRE IN FETCHING VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, July 22, 2017
One of the purposes of summer music festivals is to present unfamiliar music in an attractive and often small audience setting. The Valley of the Moon Music Festival delightfully met these requirements July 22 and 23 with two concerts in the small hall at Sonoma’s Hanna Boys Center. Classical Sono...
Recital
ORGAN REGISTRATION MASTERY HEARD IN WALHAIN'S RECITAL
by Robert Young
Tuesday, July 18, 2017
A group of 65 lucky attendees July 18 had the pleasure of hearing Etienne Walhain’s recital at the Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa. Mr. Walhain is organist at the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Tournai, Belgium, and played to a varied program Bach, Franck, and Reger. He used the tonal resource...
Opera
DONIZETTI'S DON PASQUALE HAS LYRICAL CHARM IN MENDOCINO FESTIVAL PRODUCTION
by Elly Lichenstein
Friday, July 14, 2017
Mendocino Music Festival's production of Donizetti's beloved opera buffa Don Pasquale - a one-night affair July 15 that was presented in an enormous tent on a greensward overlooking the Pacific Ocean - delighted an audience of more than 600 while doing some real justice to this frothy gem of commedi...
Recital
NOVACEK'S 2ND HALF TRIFECTA SCORES AT MENDO MUSIC FESTIVAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, July 13, 2017
Modern classical piano recitals are in two parts, with longer and perhaps more profound music proceeding perhaps shorter and usually stimulating lighter fare. In John Novacek’s July 13 Mendocino Music Festival recital the best playing came unexpectedly in the eight abbreviated works comprising the ...
Recital
STYLUS AND PLAYING FANTASTICUS IN YOUNG'S ORGAN RECITAL
by Paul Blanchard
Sunday, June 25, 2017
Organist Robert Young gave a wonderful tour through the stylus fantasticus (fantastic style) organ literature June 25 playing a recital on the Casavant organ at Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa. Mr. Young recently became the organist at the Church and previously served for 20 years as Music D...
Chamber
KODALY DUO TRUMPS POPULAR MENDELSSOHN TRIO AT SLV CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, June 21, 2017
It’s not really a secret, but Sonoma County’s best chamber music series is one without much notoriety or publicity. The concerts at Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village programs are only for residents and a few invited guests. Impresario Robert Hayden years ago honed his producer skills as founder of ...
Recital
DEMANDING VIOLIN SONATAS CONQUERED BY BEILMAN-WEISS DUO IN SCHROEDER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 14, 2017
Violinist Benjamin Beilman’s ravishing Mozart performance at last summer’s Weill Hall ChamberFest finale lured an enthusiastic crowd to Schroeder Hall May 14 to hear if his secure virtuosity was up to a program of demanding sonatas. He did not disappoint. With the powerful pianist Orion Weiss in t...
Symphony
SOVIETS INVADE WEILL HALL, TAKE NO PRISONERS
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 07, 2017
Bruno Ferrandis may be French, but he excels in Soviet repertoire. His Slavonic expertise was more than amply demonstrated at the Santa Rosa Symphony’s May 7 concert, where the program began joyfully with Khachaturian’s ballet suite from “Masquerade,” surged forward with Prokofiev’s second violin co...
Recital
MASTERFUL PIANISM IN GOODE'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, May 05, 2017
Pianist Richard Goode programmed an evening of treasures May 5 from four great composers, and is an artist of intimacy and intelligence, power and passion, able to go deep and to soar. Hearing Mr. Goode play this literature was a reminder of how music does indeed bridge worlds and time. Bach’s E m...
Recital
ELEGANT ORGAN SALUTE TO THE REFORMATION
by Paul Blanchard
Sunday, April 30, 2017
Organist Jonathan Dimmock presented an April 30 recital in homage to the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, playing Schroeder Hall’s wonderful Brombaugh instrument. Mr. Dimmock is the organist for the San Francisco Symphony, principal organist for the Palace of the Legion of Honor and teaches at...
RECITAL REVIEW
MasterCard Performance Series / Sunday, April 07, 2013
Vadim Repin, violin. Andrei Korobeinikov, piano

Violinist Vadim Repin

VADIM REPIN: STARLIGHT, SHINING BRIGHT

by Steve Osborn
Sunday, April 07, 2013


Born in Siberia in 1971, violinist Vadim Repin is as Russian as they come, but he played nary a note of Russian music in his April 7 recital at the Green Music Center's Weill Hall. The closest he got was the last movement of the Janacek violin sonata, which celebrates the triumphal entry of Russian troops into Moravia during World War I. The other sonatas on his wide-ranging program--by Brahms, Grieg and Ravel--were far removed from any Russian influence.

Musicians, however, know no borders, as evidenced by Repin and his delightful accompanist Andrei Korobeinikov's superb renditions of all the nationalities that flowed through their fingers. The nearly full house was entranced by Janacek's pungent evocations of his native Moravia; by Brahms' full-bore German romanticism; by Grieg's ebullient vision of Norway; and finally by Ravel's scintillating portrait of 1920s Paris.

Of all the sonatas Repin played, the opening Janacek was the most dramatic. A born storyteller with a flair for opera, Janacek invests his music with psychological suspense, with phrases that sound like trains of thought or surging emotions. His characteristic device is the sudden interjection--a device that Repin has thoroughly mastered. Throughout the sonata, he brought these interjections into play like flashes of lightning. The result was pure suspense. To be sure, his rhythms were exact, his intonation razor sharp, his bowings a marvel--but what carried the day was the drama, the headlong rush into compelling narrative.

Now in his 40s, Repin has long since proved his technical command of the violin. Every aspect of his playing is admirable, from the suppleness of his vibrato to his impeccable bowing and phrasing. He is old-school in his disdain for histrionics. He plays with feet firmly planted, eyes often closed, and knees flexible. In the stormiest passages, he will sometimes swoop downward, but his posture is otherwise erect and serene.

The Janacek was a concert in itself, displaying the full range of Repin's abilities, particularly his ability to enact different roles. At times he was the intruder, threatening the musical serenity with thunderbolts. At other times he was the very image of pastoral quiescence, flowing as languidly as a slow-moving river. The final movement was an absolute marvel, its phrases imbued with mystery, suspense and ultimate triumph.

After the Janacek, the Brahms Violin Sonata No. 3 seemed almost staid. Repin and Korobeinikov opted for a smooth approach to this frequently played work. The opening phrases were light, with little vibrato. As the players dug in, they maintained an excellent balance, but the results were not as impassioned as in the Janacek. It was not until the final movement that Repin really got going. He roared right in, harnessing Brahms' wild horses and driving through the score like a man possessed. The wonderful cascade of sextuplets at the movement's climax was a high point of the afternoon.

During intermission, some of the crowd wandered outside to investigate the amphitheater behind Weill Hall's rear wall, which can be opened during warm weather. The skies were gray, however, and the air cold. Fortunately, sunny skies and warm breezes were only moments away, in Grieg's Violin Sonata No. 2. This irrepressible work is about as life-affirming as music gets, with one happy phrase following another in spellbinding succession.

Repin, who had bared his soul in the previous two works, seemed utterly captivated by Grieg's optimism. The musical narrative was somewhat predictable, but Repin squeezed every ounce out of the score. He played intelligently, with full knowledge of where the music was heading, and he made it look easy. He was so relaxed that his left hand barely seemed to move during the most dazzling runs.

The applause after the Grieg was sustained, but Repin quieted everyone down by launching into Ravel's only violin sonata. The change in mood was palpable. Over the lightest of piano accompaniments, Repin's fiddle sang an eerie pentatonic song with a rollicking 6/8 beat. Playing all the while, Repin began a long decrescendo that ended with the most pianissimo sounds this side of a mute. The sustained high note at the end of the movement was magical.

Bringing America to Paris, the second movement is marked "Blues: Moderato," and bluesy it is. Blue notes, emphatic syncopations and repeated glissandi herald the entry of the Jazz Age into classical music. Repin played all of this to great effect, but Korobeinikov seemed to get a little carried away, investing his massive chords with a bit too much oomph.

In contrast, the perpetual motion of the last movement was a model of balance. Repin, who had barely looked at his music all afternoon, stared intently at the score, matching his rapid-fire runs to Korobeinikov's prestidigitations. The excitement was infectious, culminating in a spectacular ending.

After an immediate standing ovation and a couple of curtain calls, Repin played one encore, finally acknowledging one of his fellow Russians: Jascha Heifetz's version of the heavenly "Estrellita," by Manuel Ponce. It wasn't real Russian music, but it was a fitting encore for a genuine international star.

[Reprinted by permission of San Francisco Classical Voice.]