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Opera
'ELIXIR' A WELCOME TONIC IN SPRIGHTLY ANNUAL MMF OPERA
by Terry McNeill
Friday, July 19, 2019
In most of the Mendocino Music Festival’s 33 seasons a single evening is given over to a staged opera, with bare bones sets, lighting, costumes, minimal cast and short length. No Wagner or Verdi here, no multiple acts and complicated production demands. Light and frothy are the usual, and so it wa...
Recital
PUNGENT WALTZES AND VIRTUOSITY IN LADEUR'S SLV RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, July 17, 2019
San Francisco based pianist Jeffrey LaDeur has become one of the most sought-after North Bay virtuosi, and cemented that reputation July 17 in a short but eclectic recital in Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village Chamber Music Series. Before 140 in the Village’s auditorium Mr. LaDeur began with Schubert...
Choral and Vocal
NOBLE BRAHMS REQUIEM PERFORMANCE CLOSES SONOMA BACH'S SEASON
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Saturday, June 01, 2019
Sonoma Bach, conducted by Robert Worth, presented a truly grand finale to their 2018-19 "Light Out of Darkness" season in two sold out Schroeder Hall performances June 1 and 2. The program "A Human Requiem" was received rapturously with a well-deserved standing ovation for the main work, Brahms' ...
Chamber
THREE SONG CYCLES HIGHLIGHT VIBRANT SLV RECITAL
by Pamela Hicks-Gailey
Wednesday, May 08, 2019
An ambitious recital of vocal and piano music was presented May 8 at Santa Rosa’s Spring Lake Village by mezzo-soprano Kindra Scharich and pianist Jeffrey LaDeur. The duo engaged the enthusiastic audience with scholarly friendliness and artistry in performances of Beethoven's short cycle of six song...
Symphony
ALEXANDER TORADZE DELIVERS A LESSON IN SERENITY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 05, 2019
An entire concerto movement consisting of serene piano melodies over a soothing backdrop is probably not the first thing that springs to mind when seeing Shostakovich’s name on an orchestra program, but that’s exactly what pianist Alexander Toradze delivered--twice--at Sunday’s Santa Rosa Symphony c...
Symphony
MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON CLOSES WITH AUTUMNAL ELGAR AND THEATRICAL BEETHOVEN
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, April 28, 2019
Mozart’s enchanting Overture to his opera The Magic Flute, a miniature tapestry of gems from the 1791 work, opened the Marin Symphony’s final concert of the 2018-2019 season. Under conductor Alasdair Neale, the playing of the sprightly seven-minute piece by a reduced-size classical ensemble sparkled...
Recital
SHAHAM-EGUCHI DUO'S EXCITING MUSICAL GENEROSITY IN WEILL
by Abby Wasserman
Friday, April 26, 2019
Violinist Gil Shaham may be the most modest virtuoso on the concert stage today, and it is the great music he most wishes to put forward, never himself. Generosity, a quality he is known for, was abundantly clear in Weill Hall April 26 when he performed, with pianist Akira Eguchi, a generous program...
Recital
GLITTERING PIANISM IN LI'S OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Piano prodigies have always been a fascination for the music public, and the greatest of them (some were Mozart, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Saint Saëns, Hofmann) went on to legendary fame. George Li, who made is local debut at a Music at Oakmont recital April 11, was a remarkable recent keyboard prodigy t...
Symphony
SO CO PHIL'S SEASON CLOSER WITH EXPANSIVE PROKOFIEV 5TH IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 07, 2019
Closing their 20th season with their usual programming aplomb, the Sonoma County Philharmonic played a provocative set of concerts April 6 and 7 in the Jackson Theater, the Orchestra’s new home at the Sonoma Country Day School by the Sonoma County Airport. Local composer Nolan Gasser’s Sonoma Overt...
Choral and Vocal
SISTINE CHAPEL INSPIRATION FOR THE TALLIS SCHOLARS IN WEILL HALL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, April 05, 2019
Returning to Weill Hall April 5 after a seven year absence, the ten singers of the Tallis Scholars brought the sacred choral tradition of Palestrina and his contemporaries to an audience of delighted music lovers. Under the direction of Peter Phillips, the 1973 founder of the group, the program was...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Sonoma State University Symphony Orchestra / Friday, December 11, 2015
Alexander Kahn, conductor. Marilyn Thompson, piano

Alexander Kahn and Marilyn Thompson Dec. 11

THE LITTLE ORCHESTRA THAT COULD

by Terry McNeill
Friday, December 11, 2015

Hearing a symphony’s inaugural concert is a special event, and the Sonoma State Symphony Orchestra Dec. 11 launched what should be a prosperous musical life with a Weill Hall concert. The University Music Department has had permanent chamber, band and jazz ensembles, but never a flesh-in-the-blood orchestra. Now they do.
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On paper Composer John Corigliano’s "Voyage" seemed a unique opening, but the eight-minute version for strings passed without much notice or interest. It’s reminiscent of Hovhaness and conductor Alexander Kahn led effectively with the music never rising about a mezzo piano. Eschewing the excitement of a lively season overture, it was an odd choice for a gala event.

Mozart’s D Minor Concerto, K. 466, was another matter, and pianist Marilyn Thompson joined the mix in a scrappy but ultimately satisfying reading of the work from 1785. Listeners wanting pitch-perfect playing with sharp attacks, cutoffs and integrated instrumental entrances would not have found it here, but the sonic balances were good and after the initially unsteady Allegro chords the masterful Mozart drama unfolded well.

Playing from score Ms. Thompson adopted an understated approach to the solo part, preferring elegance to high drama, and here and in the concluding movement played the cadenzas by Adolph Baller. Many (Alkan, Brahms, Beethoven, Busoni) have written cadenzas for the 20th Concerto, and I found Baller’s to be idiomatic and in places provocative, with sharp and unexpected modulations. The Romanze was performed with only limited use of rubato, and Ms. Thompson’s refined playing in the finale was her best of the evening. Marie Vizcaino was a splendid oboist, contrasting with a sporadically overly loud timpanist.

Following the shortest Weill Hall intermission in memory the concert concluded with Beethoven’s First Symphony, the Haydnesque one in C Major (Op. 21) from 1800. The opening “question and answer” pair of chords for winds, horns and plucked strings immediately caught my attention, with cadences that then emerged fully formed in focused playing of the small ensemble of 25. Mr. Kahn drew a good performance throughout, especially in the Menuetto: Allegro where there was welcome section clarity. At times in rapid upward passages the high string notes were blurred, something that will surely diminish with more performances.

Applause at the end was loud and often boisterous, as colleagues of the student musicians yelled for their favorites, and the conductor was returned three times to the stage.

Prior to the Corigliano Mr. Kahn, recently appointed to the SSU faculty, addressed the audience of 300 at length regarding the gestation of the Orchestra and opportunity to join a music department of increasing importance with the Green Center’s halls as a resplendent venue. At a post-concert reception the conductor told of plans for a May, 2016 concert, and the expectation of subsequently four concerts per season. That is a pleasurable prospect for North Bay music lovers.