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SONGS AND ECHOES OF HOME IN AIZURI QUARTET CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, March 08, 2020
From the first richly layered harmonies of Dvořák’s Cypresses, the Aizuri Quartet held the March 8th audience at Mt. Tamalpais Methodist Church in thrall. The church was more than half full, a good crowd considering present anxiety about the spread of the coronavirus. Taking precautions, the M...
Choral and Vocal
COLORFUL BORN BACH AT AGAVE BAROQUE'S SCHROEDER HALL CONCERT
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, February 28, 2020
Bach’s obituary records that “Johann Sebastian Bach belongs to a family that seems to have received a love and aptitude for music as a gift of Nature to all its members in common.” Agave Baroque presented their Feb. 28 concert, Born Bach, as a partial musical story of several generations in this rem...
ECLECTIC VIOLIN AND PIANO WORKS IN VIRTUOSIC MILL VALLEY RECITAL
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, February 23, 2020
Blending virtuosity with sublime artistry, violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky and pianist Wu Qian gave the Mill Valley Chamber Music Society audience many thrills February 23, performing four muscular and soulful works by four composers from four countries: de Falla, Schumann, Stravinsky, and Grieg. T...
PREMIER OF KAIZEN AND DRAMATIC MOZART HIGHLIGHT ECHO CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, February 16, 2020
As concertgoers took their seats in San Anselmo’s First Presbyterian Church for ECHO Chamber Orchestra’s February 16 program, they were surprised to see at center stage two bass drums, a tom-tom, bongos, high hat and cymbals. It was the occasion of the world premiere of "Kaizen," composed and perf...
BEETHOVEN'S VALENTINE'S DAY GIFT IN RAC SEBASTOPOL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, February 14, 2020
Continuing a season of Redwood Arts Council successes, the Kouzov Duo performed an eclectic Valentine’s Day concert in Sebastopol’s Community Church before an audience of 125. Beethoven’s charming Op. 66 Variations on Mozart’s “Ein Mädchen oder Weibchen” from the opera the Magic Flute was a bouncy ...
LUSH BACH PERFORMANCE IN DENK'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, February 13, 2020
Memorable artistic interpretations of musical masterpieces are often at extremes, and with the Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier (WTC - Book I) that Jeremy Denk played in Weill Hall Feb. 13, the pianist was only sporadically at unique or ebullient musical ends. But his playing wasn’t exactly at opposite...
BROWNE, PAREMSKI HEAD STELLAR CAST AT SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY CONCERT
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, February 09, 2020
The Feb. 9 performance by the Santa Rosa Symphony offered a healthy dose of 21st century music firmly bound to the 19th. Matt Browne’s first symphony, “The Course of Empire”—based on a series of five paintings by Thomas Cole, who founded the Hudson River School of American painting in the 1820s—emp...
FRENCH ORCHESTRAL MUSIC A FIRST FOR THE SO CO PHILHARMONIC
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 02, 2020
Over many years the Sonoma County Philharmonic has played little French music, but perhaps this oversight was corrected Feb. 2 in a splendid all-Gallic program Feb. 1 and 2 in the Jackson Theater. Classical Sonoma reviewed the Sunday afternoon concert. In his eighth conducting season with the So C...
POLISH MUSICAL WORLDS GLOW BRIGHT IN NFM WROCLAW WEILL PERFORMANCE
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, February 01, 2020
The NFM Wroclaw Philharmonic, with conductor Giancarlo Guerrero, gave a concert of enormous energy and emotional impact on Feb.1 to a small audience in Weill Hall. This orchestra has been a major cultural force in Poland since 1949, playing under many renowned conductors and has been committed to pr...
EXTRAVAGANT ARIAS IN NEXT GENERATION TENORS GALA VALLEJO CONCERT
by Mark Kratz
Saturday, February 01, 2020
“Beautiful, strange, and unnatural…” said orchestra conductor Thomas Conlin when speaking of the tenor voice. One of the coveted voice types of the opera world, the tenor voice is known for it’s piercing tones and soaring, unnatural high notes. The iconic image of the Pagliacci clown (in the famed...
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Santa Rosa Symphony / Monday, November 04, 2019
Francesco Lecce-Chong, conductor. Béla Fleck, banjo

Béla Fleck and Francesco Lecce-Chong Nov. 4 in Weill Hall (J. McNeill photo)

MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANCE IN UNIQUE SRS CONCERT IN WEILL HALL

by Terry McNeill
Monday, November 04, 2019

It was a concert full of surprises Nov. 4 as the Santa Rosa Symphony responded to the area’s wild fires and evacuations with challenging, songful and somewhat unique music in Weill Hall. The last of a three-concert series titled "Master of the Modern Banjo" is reviewed here.

The evening began with two spiritual announcements from the stage, starting with Symphony President Alan Silow pointing to the powerful message great music gives to the North Bay undergoing physical affliction, and conductor Francesco Lecce-Chong describing the support from community and colleagues that overcame dislocations to produce luminous music in the second set of seven triple concerts in the 92nd season. The conductor added that with Weill closed at least one rehearsal was held in the nearby Graton Casino, and that Copland’s opening Four Dance Episodes from the 1942 Ballet “Rodeo” would be shortened to just the final episode, due to inadequate rehearsal time.

But as a surprise, Mr. Lecce-Chong conducted a seven-minute pastiche arrangement by Carmen Dragon of the 1910 iconic “America The Beautiful”. When the conductor turned to face the audience of 1,100 they responded with muted and happy singing. The applause was loud.

Quickly changing the mood was the special excitement that Copeland wove into music of his 1930-1945 period, excitement that was borne on the virtuosity of the brass (Bruce Chrisp’s trombone solo), percussion effects, wood block and even a bit of piano sound that usually is inaudible in orchestral works. It was a lively and persuasive performance, and seemingly prepared the audience for the rare chance to experience banjo virtuoso Béla Fleck playing a concerto that he composed. The Juno Concerto from 2016 is in three movements and has frequent references to Copland’s themes but only faint shadows of the familiar Copland orchestration.

Over 29 minutes the work’s mood varies from minimalism to dramatic instrumental outbursts in a conservative harmonic idiom. Fine playing in the first movement was heard from Stacy Pelinka (piccolo), horn duos with clarinetist Roy Zajac, and timpanist Andrew Lewis, giving a movement-ending single note an individual character.

The middle movement involved banjo phrasing that had the air of questioning, with the Orchestra answering, and had references to such compositional opposites as Gerald Finzi, Glass and Reich. The Cadenza in the middle combined the banjo part with Laura Reynolds' solo oboe. Lovely flute playing was heard in a march-like section of big sonorities, but the ending was lightweight with the banjo line ending at the top of the fingerboard with three mysterious pianissimo notes. Beautiful.

In the finale Mr. Fleck’s music contrasted his wonderful finger picking with the woodwinds, but also evolved with scant relationship of the solo banjo and the orchestral texture. In this movement there were faint sounds of country banjo phrases. Using amplification, Mr. Fleck gave new weight throughout to banjo virtuosity. Strangely enough, at least from a balcony seat, the banjo sounded unlike the familiar banjo of pop and country music, and perhaps the electronic rendering contributed to lessening the “edge” of the banjo’s twang and dry harmonic flavor.

Returning to the stage with huge applause, the soloist launched into what surely was the longest encore in the Hall’s history, an eight-minute improvisation that was captivating and richly satisfying. The waiting Orchestra members appeared to love the exhibitionism and false cadences in the encore, the best encore in my memory since Lang Lang’s deliciously tasteless “Minute Waltz” in Weill’s inaugural 2013 concert.

Following intermission what could fit with the musical memory of the unique Juno Concerto and its formidable composer-performer? An extravagant orchestral showpiece was in order, and Mr. Lecce-Chong (not using a score) delivered a stunning Mussorgsky Pictures at and Exhibition in the Ravel arrangement. Scott Macomber’s opening trumpet solo was exact, with clarion playing in the 15 short sections from hornist Meredith Brown, bass clarinetist Mark Shannon, the bassoons and the three-musician percussion section. First violin clarity in fast ascending passages was exemplary, and the second violin and contrabass (seated stage left) sound was unusually transparent and fulsome.

This Mussorgsky performance found Mr. Lecce-Chong in a particularly animated posture, with gymnastic body movements and cues, but also producing with his marvelous Orchestra over 35 minutes a champagne orgy of sound and potent musical histrionics. At the thunderous conclusion of the Great Gate of Kiev section the audience rose almost as one in an extended tsunami of applause and appreciative yells.